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462 votes

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20 votes

Rand Paul TIME op-ed: Cuba Isolationists Just Don’t Get It

by Sen. Rand Paul
December 19, 2014

Paul is the junior U.S. Senator for Kentucky.

Let's hope cooler heads will ultimately prevail and we unleash a trade tsunami that washes the Castros once and for all into the sea.

I grew up in a family that despised, not only communism, but collectivism, socialism and any “ism” that deprived the individual of his or her natural rights.

45 votes

I will pray for you all, always.

This is my commitment for 2015.

Séamusín's brother-in-law just passed away suddenly. I already knew of another here who had someone important suddenly pass away. From the comments in Séamusín's thread, a number of Daily Paulers have had the same thing happen.

4 votes

The Problem With Police

I can't with full conscience blame the police totally for all the incidents that have recently taken place. From the killing of twelve year old Tamir Rice in Ohio, to the actions taken against protesters during Occupy Wall Street, the police are not the only ones to blame. I would even go further and say the police have very little blame placed upon them. The politicians are the ones to blame for one hundred percent of the events that have taken place these last few years. Sure, the police have some responsibility in a moral aspect to respect their fellow man and women by refusing to comply with the orders demanded by politicians even if that sacrifices their jobs. We the people also are to blame for demanding government do something about everything and not demanding them to do nothing about something.

Politicians are elected to govern within the restrictions set by the federal and state constitutions. For the last few decades or more, politicians have violated that restriction for political gain. They want the people to see that they are doing something. When something horrible happens, the politicians are right there to promise new laws and restrictions and the people allow this to happen.

The issue today with all these incidence involving police is a direct consequence of years of laws that are nonsense. From the war on drugs to the attempted soda ban, these are "laws" that create conflict. The politicians write the "laws" and they send the police to do their dirty work. Naturally, the ones who are seen as aggressors will hold the blame such as the police are now, and the politicians who caused the aggression will use the situation to their advantage when the people cry for them to do something, which is also happening now.

16 votes

Feel Good Story of the Day

My wife told me this yesterday.

One of her friends was diagnosed with breast cancer awhile back, had treatment, and was going about her life. However, the cancer has returned now as stage 4 brain cancer. She's undergone the gamma knife procedure, but the doctors still predict she has a relatively short time to live.

38 votes

Rand Paul: 'Seems to me, Senator Rubio is acting like an isolationist'


"Senator Marco Rubio believes the embargo against Cuba has been ineffective, yet he wants to continue perpetuating failed policies. After 50 years of conflict, why not try a new approach? The United States trades and engages with other communist nations, such as China and Vietnam. Why not Cuba? I am a proponent of peace through commerce, and I believe engaging Cuba can lead to positive change.

7 votes

Please Stop Helping Us

Why is it that so many efforts by liberals to lift the black underclass not only fail, but often harm the intended beneficiaries?

In Please Stop Helping Us, Jason L. Riley examines how well-intentioned welfare programs are in fact holding black Americans back. Minimum-wage laws may lift earnings for people who are already employed, but they price a disproportionate number of blacks out of the labor force. Affirmative action in higher education is intended to address past discrimination, but the result is fewer black college graduates than would otherwise exist. And so it goes with everything from soft-on-crime laws, which make black neighborhoods more dangerous, to policies that limit school choice out of a mistaken belief that charter schools and voucher programs harm the traditional public schools that most low-income students attend.
In theory these efforts are intended to help the poor—and poor minorities in particular. In practice they become massive barriers to moving forward.

16 votes

Bought 90oz of silver today

Not trying to brag, just thought I'd let you know, and maybe inspire someone on the fence to act. I'm not looking to flip or "invest". I'm in it long term, like, willing it to the grand kids long term. (I don't have kids yet)

38 votes

Nystrom, the Jap.

Pssst.

Hey.

Tell me something I don't know about you. This is kind of like DP truth or dare, only without the dare. We can do that one later.

Tell me something true about you.

I'll start: If I titled it, I'd call it "Nystrom, the Jap."

- - -

While I am American for the virtue and accident of birth, i.e., having been born on the soil of the Empire, my mother was a citizen of the country of Japan. She worked, as a copytypist (as in, to make copies), for the U.S. Army Occupation of Japan secretarial pool.

7 votes

Baltic Dry Index Has Biggest Post-Thanksgivings Day Drop In 28-Year History

The sound of deckchairs being rearranged.
------------------
The Baltic Dry Index Has Never Crashed This Fast Post-Thanksgiving

We are sure it's nothing - since stock markets in China and The US are soaring - but deep, deep down in the heart of the real economies, there is a problem. The Baltic Dry Index has fallen for 21 straight days, tumbling around 40% since Thanksgiving Day.

16 votes

VIDEO: Rand Paul Calls Marco Rubio An Isolationist

VIDEO: Rand Paul Calls Marco Rubio An Isolationist

ALEX PAPPAS
Political Reporter

It’s a term Rand Paul has rejected when applied to his own foreign policy.

But on Friday, the libertarian-leaning Republican senator referred to Florida Sen. Marco Rubio, a potential opponent in the 2016 GOP presidential primary, as an “isolationist.”

34 votes

Cops being turned against the public, targeting Constitutionalists, and Liberty lovers.

A friend of mine that is a police officer locally brought it to my attention that they watched a training film. He did not know where the video came from, but it was pointed directly as those that hold the Constitution as the supreme law of the land. Here is the video that was shown to represent "all" Constitutionalists.


http://youtu.be/d_y-gLm9Hrw

8 votes

The Color Of Loss, Separation, and Longing

“To see the Earth as it truly is, small and blue and beautiful in that eternal silence where it floats,” the poet Archibald MacLeish wrote after Apollo 8’s legendary “Earthrise” photograph made its debut in 1968, “is to see ourselves as riders on the Earth together, brothers on that bright loveliness in the eternal cold…” Its unprecedented perspective of distance seemed, paradoxically enough, to bring us earthlings closer together, to desire connection to one another more strongly than ever before. Nearly three decades earlier, Simone Weil touched on another aspect of this paradoxical relationship between spatial remoteness and emotional closeness when she wrote in a letter to a friend: “Let us love this distance, which is thoroughly woven with friendship, since those who do not love each other are not separated.” So much of “the aggregate of our joy and suffering” that takes place on our Pale Blue Dot seems to stem from this eternal tug-of-war between distance and desire.

The world is blue at its edges and in its depths. This blue is the light that got lost. Light at the blue end of the spectrum does not travel the whole distance from the sun to us. It disperses among the molecules of the air, it scatters in water. Water is colorless, shallow water appears to be the color of whatever lies underneath it, but deep water is full of this scattered light, the purer the water the deeper the blue. The sky is blue for the same reason, but the blue at the horizon, the blue of land that seems to be dissolving into the sky, is a deeper, dreamier, melancholy blue, the blue at the farthest reaches of the places where you see for miles, the blue of distance. This light that does not touch us, does not travel the whole distance, the light that gets lost, gives us the beauty of the world, so much of which is in the color blue.

In A Field Guide to Getting Lost that sublime meditation on how we find ourselves in the unknown — Rebecca Solnit examines the color blue and its relationship to desire in an exquisite essay that begins with the scientific and blossoms into the poetic.

8 votes

“The Interview" - Sony’s Shame, Paramount’s Blunder, and The Cost To Clever Theater Owners

As of now, everyone should know about the cyber hack attack on Sony, allegedly orchestrated by the government of North Korea, which revealed some very…interesting emails and personal data for executives and everyday employees of the company. If that weren’t enough, the “Fighting Kim Jongs” (as they like to be called) also hinted at 9/11 style terror attacks on theaters who would dare to show the film.

The proper response to this, in my opinion, would be for Sony to laugh in the face of this and release the film. Not only for practical reasons – that a terror attack by North Koreans here in the US would be virtually impossible and insanely unlikely even if we were in all out war with that poor and downtrodden nation – but also for the sake of not bowing to terrorist threats. Sony did not take that response, and instead pulled “The Interview” from all theaters, everywhere. Now, Sony is a private entity and can do what it likes. Their hand was forced by theater chains unwilling to take the chance (who also should be ashamed of themselves) and thus refusing to show the film. However, Sony making the decision to forgo showing the film anywhere, even if a theater desired it, seems cowardly and on top of it all, stupid.

I’m a publicist by trade. And I can’t help but look at this situation from a PR perspective, from the standpoint of our economy (more on that later) and from the standpoint of public favor being destroyed by bad PR moves.