4 votes

What are your top-ten favorite liberty-oriented novels?

My personal list:
1. Atlas Shrugged, by Ayn Rand
2. The Iron Web, by Larken Rose
3. Kings of the High Frontier, by Victor Koman
4. The Moon is a Harsh Mistress, by Robert A. Heinlein
5. Unintended Consequences, by John Ross
6. The Black Arrow, by Vin Suprinowicz
7. Island, by Thomas Perry
8. Pallas, by L. Neil Smith
9. Alongside Night, by J. Neil Schulman
10.The Great Explosion, by Eric Frank Russell

I'm not claiming that these are the 10 best liberty-oriented novels ever written -- just the best I've read, according to my own idiosyncratic tastes. Now let's see YOUR lists.

Update: Thanks to rmcc4444, for suggesting that this be known as The Iron Web / thread. If any of you have read Larken Rose's book, you'll see a neat double meaning in that. If you haven't -- do.

And here's my SECOND list of ten runners-up:

11. Little Brother, by Cory Doctorow
12. The Diamond Age, by Neal Stephenson
13. The Survival of Freedom, (anthology of short stories) ed. by Jerry Pournelle and John Carr
14. Forge of the Elders, by L.Neil Smith
15. The Third Revolution, by Anthony F. Lewis
16. The LaNague Chronicles, by F. Paul Wilson (omnibus containing three novels: "An Enemy of the State," "Wheels Within Wheels," and "Healer")
17. The Education of Little Tree, by Forrest Carter
18. Infinity Hold, by Barry Longyear
19. The Rainbow Cadenza, by J. Neil Schulman
20. The Truth, by Terry Pratchett

I left off a few favorites that have already been named by other posters. (The Fountainhead, Molon Labe!, One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, and We the Living).



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Some more good stuff

That I've read (or recalled) in the last couple years since I started this thread -- in no particular order:

  • Santiago, by Mike Resnick
  • The Man Who Never Missed, by Steve Perry (the first book of a series -- recommended)
  • Little Fuzzy, by H. Beam Piper
  • The Syndic, by C.M. Kornbluth
  • This Perfect Day, by Ira Levin
  • Give Me Liberty (anthology) ed. by Mark Tier and Martin Greenberg)
  • The Dispossessed, by Ursula LeGuin
  • Let Us Prey, by Bill Branon
  • Tai Pan, by James Clavell
  • The Cybernetic Samaurai, by Victor Milan
  • "The Ungoverned," a short story in Vernor Vinge's collection, True Names ... and Other Dangers
  • Robert A. Heinlein "juveniles", particularly Red Planet, Have Spacesuit Will Travel, and Tunnel in the Sky.
  • Wildside, by Steven Gould
  • Oath of Fealty, by Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle

Recommended reading: The Most Dangerous Superstition, http://www.amazon.com/Most-Dangerous-Superstition-Larken-Ros...

Another list of libertarian fiction

I'll add this list here as well: 80+ libertarian novels, including a bunch that are free to read online.

I liked Jennifer Government

I liked Jennifer Government by Max Barry and Little Brother by Cory Doctorow.

Thanks for recommending Jennifer Government

It's a cool story. The only problem is: it's pro-government, not pro-freedom. Barry sees government as the good guys, corporations as the bad guys. Kinda dumb that he doesn't understand that the government's grant of limited liability to corporations is what allows them to behave irresponsibly and get away with it.

Another book based on a similar social vision is C.M. Kornbluth's The Syndic It tells the story what happens after the government & financial systems have collapsed under the weight of their own bureaucracy. The Syndicate supplies liquor, gambling, women, loans, employment and its own justice -- in other words, everything the public needs, at prices everyone can afford. It's the best of all possible worlds -- until the bad old US Government begins to re-emerge. The characters aren't as well drawn as Barry's, but it's much more libertarian. Written back in 1953, but still a fun read.

Cory Doctorow's Little Brother is absolutely excellent -- I read it too late to put in my top ten, but it belongs there.

Recommended reading: The Most Dangerous Superstition, http://www.amazon.com/Most-Dangerous-Superstition-Larken-Ros...

what about these ?

the talmud by rabinical rabbis
the protocols of the learned elders of zion by rothschilds ?

itsbeenalongtriphome

what about

you take your weird religious conspiracy agenda, and go back in your hole? You could spend your time learning to spell and to use those complicated capital letters. With diligent study, you might even be able to develop a second I.Q. point before the first one dies of loneliness.

Recommended reading: The Most Dangerous Superstition, http://www.amazon.com/Most-Dangerous-Superstition-Larken-Ros...

how about these?

the gospel of the christ according to luke or mark.
war is a racket by usmc gen. schmedley butler
pawns in the game by admiral william guy carr
an american ceasar by william manchester
the story of civilization 11 book set by will durrant
these should be read by anyone who desires true knowledge of where we came from and where we are headed

itsbeenalongtriphome

All novels?

You're going to annoy a lot of Christians on this site if you suggest that the Bible is fiction.

Recommended reading: The Most Dangerous Superstition, http://www.amazon.com/Most-Dangerous-Superstition-Larken-Ros...

I have found that re-reading Twain ...

as an adult and not in a class with a teacher telling you what the book means ...

made me realize that most if not all of his work was about freedom.

Wha? I got to figure you did

Wha? I got to figure you did not see "V"..lol

Saw it , read it and enjoyed it.

I liked the theme of the book and the plot, but hated the muddy artwork & couldn't tell the villains apart. The movie had a cleaner storyline, but the anarchistic theme was edited out. Mostly, though, it's not on my list because I was trying to focus this thread on novels -- NOT graphic novels, movies, plays or nonfiction.

Recommended reading: The Most Dangerous Superstition, http://www.amazon.com/Most-Dangerous-Superstition-Larken-Ros...

Also, Cra$hmaker. It's long

Also, Cra$hmaker. It's long and expensive but it's a great novel based on the FED, global finance, etc. Not for the faint of hard but well worth the read.

http://www.amazon.com/Cra-hmaker-Federal-Affaire-Novel/dp/09...

My second ten

This is my NEXT top ten. They didn't make the cut for my top ranks, but they are all excellent liberty-themed novels:

11. Little Brother, by Cory Doctorow
12. The Diamond Age, by Neal Stephenson
13. The Survival of Freedom, (anthology of short stories) ed. by Jerry Pournelle and John Carr
14. Forge of the Elders, by L.Neil Smith
15. The Third Revolution, by Anthony F. Lewis
16. The LaNague Chronicles, by F. Paul Wilson (omnibus containing three novels: "An Enemy of the State," "Wheels Within Wheels," and "Healer")
17. The Education of Little Tree, by Forrest Carter
18. Infinity Hold, by Barry Longyear
19. The Rainbow Cadenza, by J. Neil Schulman
20. The Truth, by Terry Pratchett

I left off a few favorites that have already been named by other posters. (The Fountainhead, Molon Labe!, One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, and We the Living).

Recommended reading: The Most Dangerous Superstition, http://www.amazon.com/Most-Dangerous-Superstition-Larken-Ros...

How about

The Gulag Archipelago...More appropriate as it describes in detail the bloody consequences due to a lack of freedom.

Just one last kick in the nuts, then a final deathblow

Catch 22

No contest. Catch 22. Accept no substitute.

Ĵīɣȩ Ɖåđşŏń

"Fully half the quotations found on the internet are either mis-attributed, or outright fabrications." - Abraham Lincoln

Yeah, that should have been

Yeah, that should have been on the list.

Great book. Simply brilliant.

Ta,

Every decent man is ashamed of the government he lives under. -- H.L. Mencken

Blog: The Present in Plain Text
Listen to The Myo-Tonics on YouTube

Yeah, that should have been

Yeah, that should have been on the list.

Great book. Simply brilliant.

Ta,

Every decent man is ashamed of the government he lives under. -- H.L. Mencken

Blog: The Present in Plain Text
Listen to The Myo-Tonics on YouTube

Iron Web /thread :)

Iron Web

/thread

:)

I'm slow

finally got it. :) I'll re-name the thread in your honor.

Recommended reading: The Most Dangerous Superstition, http://www.amazon.com/Most-Dangerous-Superstition-Larken-Ros...

Molon Labe!

I'm surprised no one has mentioned Molon Labe! - a great book by "Boston T. Party" (Kenneth Royce)

No King but Jesus, no President but Ron Paul

Best Reads

I second "1984" and "The Fountainhead" (my current Number One). I think Ken Kesey's "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest" was a great Liberty Novel - an Awakener for me. I am in the midst of reading Henry Hazlitt's "Time Will Run Back", and it may end up as one of my Top Ten.

TheoVanG

Mine aren't all novels...just good liberty reading...

Off the top of my head...

1. Declaration of Independence & U.S. Constitution
2. Atlas Shrugged (Ayn Rand)
3. The Creature From Jekyll Island (G. Edward Griffin)
4. The Revolution (Ron Paul)
5. The New Pearl Harbor (David Ray Griffin)
6. Brave New World (Aldous Huxley)
7. The Law (Bastiat)
8. Economics in One Lesson (Henry Hazlitt)
9. A Foreign Policy of Freedom (Ron Paul)
10. The Virtue of Selfishness (Ayn Rand)

"We have allowed our nation to be over-taxed, over-regulated, and overrun by bureaucrats. The founders would be ashamed of us for what we are putting up with."
-Ron Paul

I can't believe...

that nobody had mentioned "The Revolution" by Ron Paul before this! Where are our heads today!?

Thomas Jefferson: “Indeed, I tremble for my country when I reflect that God is just, that His justice cannot sleep forever."

Viva La Revolucion!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FmaTNf4YhEs

I plead guilty for not making my list all novels.

I mentioned "The Revolution" but it is not fiction as this post originally asked for.

But I don't generally read fiction.

It's largely a waste of time because there is more nonfiction out there than we could read in several lifetimes.

Fiction is fun ocassionally, but for me it's just a figment of someone's imagination and I want to learn factual things.

So I didn't really answer what she asked for, but instead mentioned mostly nonfiction books I've read.

Nevertheless I'll bet "The Revolution" would be in everyone's top ten nonfiction books here.

"We have allowed our nation to be over-taxed, over-regulated, and overrun by bureaucrats. The founders would be ashamed of us for what we are putting up with."
-Ron Paul

Hopefully

it wasn't mentioned because it's NOT fiction.

Recommended reading: The Most Dangerous Superstition, http://www.amazon.com/Most-Dangerous-Superstition-Larken-Ros...

I can't think of many, and I

I can't think of many, and I have read a lot of fiction.

Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand(which I did not like)
V for Vendetta by Alan Moore
The Dark Knight Strikes Again by Frank Miller
Robin Hood by Howard Pyle
1984 by George Orwell

Ventura 2012

If you like graphic novels,

Alan Moore's "Watchmen" is also excellent.

Recommended reading: The Most Dangerous Superstition, http://www.amazon.com/Most-Dangerous-Superstition-Larken-Ros...

But Watchmen is not about

But Watchmen is not about liberty, its conclusion is that we must accept the Hobbesian dialectic and the plans of our masters b/c humanity is not capable of forestalling its own destruction.

For all of its literary pretensions, Watchmen is still nothing more than cheap leftist propaganda... well written, but hollow. Moore's a left-anarchist and is economically illiterate. He does a better job of masking it in V for Vendetta.

So, no to Watchmen being on any liberty list.

My list? (in no particular order, except for Kakfa and Dick)

1) The Trial by Franz Kafka
2) A Scanner Darkly -- 1 of many by Philip K. Dick
3) Cryptonomicon by Neal Stephenson
4) The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant by Stephan R. Donaldson.
5) The Lord of the Rings (DUH!)
6) 1984 by George Orwell
7) The Dark Knight Returns by Frank Miller
8) Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand
9) V for Vendetta by Alan Moore
10) The Prisoner (original series)

Ta,

Every decent man is ashamed of the government he lives under. -- H.L. Mencken

Blog: The Present in Plain Text
Listen to The Myo-Tonics on YouTube

I didnt read that much into

I didnt read that much into the Watchmen but I certainly did not see anything resembling a liberty message in there. I'm interested that you think the Dark Knight Returns was libertarian. It is one of my favorite works of fiction but it wasn't very political like its inferior successor, IMO.

Ventura 2012

I really wanted to add all of

I really wanted to add all of Grant Morrison's early DC work:

The Invisibles
Doom Patrol (#19-63)
Animal Man, especially Issue #5, The Coyote Gospel.
Arkham Ayslum

But, these are less overtly political (except the Invisibles) than they are philosophical in their approach.

Ta,

Every decent man is ashamed of the government he lives under. -- H.L. Mencken

Blog: The Present in Plain Text
Listen to The Myo-Tonics on YouTube