0 votes

High-Fructose Corn Syrup Getting Rebranded as Corn Sugar

So the CRA is meeting with the FDA today to get them to change the name of high-fructose corn syrup to corn sugar. I guess they think people ARE that stupid. Well,maybe they are but people are eating less of the product so somebody's listening.

Here's the article:

The good news: Consumption of high-fructose corn syrup is at a 20-year low.

The bad news: The folks who make this insidious sweetener aim to rebrand it to boost sales.

Continue: http://www.livescience.com/health/etc/high-fructose-corn-syr...

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

This is interesting

Thank you for posting.
Marking it for further reading.

"I don't endorse anything they say"
~Ron Paul On the 911 Truth movement.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hGyhlNY0y1k

Corn Syrup is OK but HIGH FRUCTOSE corn syrup is not

BEESTING:
Although I try to avoid processed sugar and corn syrup...the big health deal is with HIGH FRUCTOSE corn syrup.

this comment below is worth looking at:
http://www.dailypaul.com/node/144493#comment-1535994

It might also be because the corn is GMO and they use petroleum based insecticides....you might be right.

Thanks For That Link.

If anyone is interested in raising Honey bees, I found this is the best feed for them,

http://www.damoc.com/beefeed/drifeed.html

although it is very expensive compared to other types of Honeybee feed.

beesting

Yeah, but to me corn syrups are sweetened yucky.

They just taste bad.

Free includes debt-free!

Yep

not Karo.

Posted For Information Purposes Only !

Corn syrup is an excellent preservative, which means many canned goods, including soda, store bought canned fruits and vegetables, most store bought candies, cereals, bread, etc.etc. contain corn syrup.
Check the labels before buying.

I'm a former commercial beekeeper and fed my Honeybees corn syrup when no blooming flowers were in season, along with most of the other beekeeper in my area.

Some of my Honeybees died out for years while doing this, and nobody could figure out why to this day.

Recently I rethought my thinking and came up with a theory.
Farmers that grow large amounts of corn to be used for corn syrup,"might" spray insecticides on their corn crops to kill insect infestations.
Could some of this insecticide spray in very small amounts get into the finished product { corn syrup } in quantities high enough to kill Honeybees that drink it???

Bee careful of what you eat and in my humble opinion, homegrown is the best, even though it might have insect bites on it.

Hint: Store bought fresh food that "Looks" good sells much better than blemished fresh food, even though the blemished just might be pesticide free.

P.S. The only sweetener used at my house is raw Honey, and my son got an achievement award for 5 years of perfect attendance at his school, the only kid to ever get this award, as far as the teachers knew.

beesting

‘High fructose corn syrup is not ideal for bees

nutritionally, and if it did contain neonicotionoids, it could be the straw that breaks the camel’s back,’ he said.

Benbrook has tested a number of samples of HFCS for the pesticide but, whilst some did contain the chemical, he admits that his results are not yet conclusive.

He added that monoculture farming was part of the problem, and said that it was ‘impossible’ to farm in such a way without being reliant on heavy doses of toxins.

But Benbrook said he believed such farming systems were becoming unsustainable.

‘I think agriculture has entered into a phase of dramatic change,’ he said. ‘We’ll see changes in the next 20 years comparable to changes we’ve seen since we invented agriculture.
http://www.theecologist.org/News/news_round_up/270423/pestic...

And never forget, “Humans, despite our artistic pretensions, our sophistication and many accomplishments, owe the fact of our existence to a six-inch layer of topsoil and the fact that it rains.”

Neonicotinoids? So corn syrup

Neonicotinoids? So corn syrup contains the same addictive drug as cigarettes? That certainly explains a lot!

I am out of touch with most Americans precisely because I am not out of touch with reality.

I don't see what's wrong with "re-branding"

After all, our troops in Iraq are now "non-combatants" and the war is over, right?

The same thing with HFCS- Obesity, diabetes, and all other ailments associated with that crap will now cease to exist.

The blue pill is wonderful.

(please not the above sarcasm..I am a card carrying red pill taeker, thank you very much)

Cheers,

TimB

Indeed

When our philosophies degrade to mere psycoholgies, liberty is stillborn.

Free includes debt-free!

Obesity isn't the only problem with HFCS

A little background: About 2.5 years ago, I was diagnosed with the digestive disorder Fructose Malabsorption. Since then, I've done heavy research on the disorder from many different medical journals and contacting doctors.

High intake of fructose not only affects weight, but it also affects mood, especially in women. I'm assuming that individuals--even those who do not have FM--eating large quantities of fructose will have problems with depression as the human body is not made to consume and digest large amounts of fructose.

Any fructose that is not broken down in the small intestine passes into the large intestine. In the large intestine, the fructose reacts with proteins and amino acids (e.g., L-tryptophan) which impact the production of serotonin. This is, of course, defined as depression resulting from a chemical imbalance.

On a personal note: I struggled with serious clinical depression since I was very young. I've been on all sorts of drugs (all of which I hated to take). My struggle culminated into a clusterf*ck situation where I was hospitalized for three days and placed in out-patient treatment for two weeks. Since I was diagnosed with FM, I've had to cut out fructose as much as possible and since this dietary change, I haven't had any problems with depression.

Sources: One Two Three.

Not only is the US government making people physically sick (obesity, type II diabetes) with their ridiculous corn subsidies, they are also making mentally unstable children and adults. No "clever" marketing strategy will change the very real affects of too much fructose consumption.

Interesting, so do you have

Interesting, so do you have to cut all fruits or just HFCS and other fructose sweeteners?

Most fruits and some

Most fruits and some vegetables except for those that have a glucose-fructose ratio of 1:1 or where glucose is greater than fructose. Anything that contains inulin, such as garlic or onions. Anything that contains sorbitol, such as stone fruits.

I also try to avoid gluten because of fructan chains. Rye bread is probably the best bread for FM since it contains the longest fructan chains, though I've been experimenting lately with gluten-free food. The jury's still out on that one though...

And of course, anything with HFCS or other corn syrup derivatives. Honey as well - that's pure fructose.

If I consume too much fructose, I end up with symptoms similar to food poisoning. To illustrate my point, you give me an apple (g:f roughly 20:80) and I'll projectile vomit about 30-40 minutes later, guaranteed.

reedr3v's picture

Wow, I'd never heard of that sensitivity.

I'm so glad that you found the problem at a young age so you can live healthily and free of depression. I have to avoid gluten, but that's nothing like the list you cannot eat -- of course it's worth it to feel good and function well.

I pretty much avoid all grains for maximum health.

Monocot grains like rice, corn, wheat, barley, rye and their byproducts.

I also avoid grain-fed animals as that diet decreases the ratio of healthy fatty acids. Since I am an animal, refer to the above.

As far as I am concerned the government's "Food Pyramid" is upside down perhaps as it is a result of political not scientific actions. Low fat diets and bad fat diets as well as high carbohydrate diets prevent good health and shorten life, IMO.

Oh, but I eat well! Bacon, eggs, sausage, good beef, and chicken, potato chips cooked in the right oils, sour cream, ice cream, lots of dark chocolate, wild seafoods, legumes, cucurbits, nuts galore about two pounds of almonds a week. Just no grains and no low Omega-3 fats and oils. Yes they are more expensive but I rarely feel like overeating and smaller amount provide the the needed energy.

Grains also increase blood triglycerides and increases the level of "bad" cholesterol. I am sad to see friends avoiding good fats and oils for bad grains. Leading of course to the supposed need for Big Pharma's products and all their bad side effects.

Starting 3 years ago, My wife and I lost nearly 50 pounds (my son lost a hundred) Our cholesterol, triglyceride, HDL/LDL levels are spot on. Blood pressure 116/80, ideal BMI and I sure could have used this level of controllable brain activity when I was in college 35 years ago.

"You, the User's Manual" by Roizen and Oz, is a great starting point and I liked their RealAgeTM program.

Looking into Mark's Primal Diet http://www.marksdailyapple.com that I found at http://www.lewrockwell.com/ .

"Feed your body Right" by Lendon Smith and Sugar Blues got us started on the right foot so many years ago. We never fed our children white sugar or corn syrups.

Free includes debt-free!

I've also lost 40 pounds

I've also lost 40 pounds since being diagnosed with FM, about 20 lbs just cutting out all products made with corn syrup and HFCS. Just thought I'd throw that one out there for you.

Very interesting

Sugar: The Bitter Truth

You can hardly talk about high-fructose corn syrup without referencing this video by Robert Lustig - 90 minutes, but well worth it.

Sugar: The Bitter Truth

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dBnniua6-oM

This is an incredible lecture!

He makes a strong case that fructose is a chronic poison.

Fructose calories are equivalent to fat calories.

Fructose is ethanol (alcohol) with out the buzz as far a its danger to our livers.

And so much more. The basic information was first published in 1972. The biochemistry explains our national health disaster.

Thank you very much!

Free includes debt-free!

Fructose a "poison"?

I don't think so. Fructose is the main sugar in fruits, as well as honey, which people have eaten forever with no ills... at least, until recent generations, when people are seemingly sensitive and allergic to everything. (Me included ... no dairy, no gluten.)

So-called "high fructose corn syrup" is a different story. HFCS is no higher in fructose than cane sugar. (50/50) I'm not an expert on this, but HFCS has been said to be able to "fool" the brain's satiety sensor, so the brain does not sense when you are full. So, you keep eating more ....

Plus, nowadays it's all coming from Frankencorn that's been sprayed with poison. THere seem to be toxins added during the processing as well.

From what reading I've done about sugars, the culprit there would not seem to be fructose. Fructose is very low glycemic -- i.e. breaks down slowly and does not spike the blood sugar. HIgh blood sugar is where lots of troubles begin. Hypoglycemia, diabetes, weight gain, systemic candidasis...

I used an energy supplement sweetened with fructose for years (several times a day) and never experienced any problems, only increased energy and stamina. ANd also, by the way, eliminated cravings for alcohol and nicotine! Can't say the fructose played any major role in those issues, however.

If you're going to finger a culprit, I would ID the other half of HFCS-- the glucose. Glocuse, after all, is blood sugar, which means when you ingest it, WHAM--it is instantly absorbed into the blood.

I should add, however

That the Standard American Diet contains way too many sugars of whatever kind, in dead foods divorced from the matrix of minerals & enzymes needed for absorption & metabolism, and fiber which serves to slow down sugar absorption.

Great Vid!

Great Vid!

Farts smell like fruit cocktail, want to buy an air freshener?

The people putting packages on grocery store shelves no longer have any idea what "food" is, so stop being surprised that all they are doing is marketing and profiting. No where on their list of priorities is "provide sustenance."

Love or fear? Chose again with every breath.

Liberty means producers can sell what they want

The crime here is that massive corn subsidies and ridiculously high import tariffs on cane sugar make HFCS the cheapest sweetener. Ever wonder why Mexican coke uses cane sugar? It's not because Mexicans are more health conscious consumers. Producers should be free to sell HFCS if they want so long as they don't lie about it (fraud), but without state-sanction theft in the form of subsidies and tariffs, we wouldn't have this poison in so many of the foodstuffs on the shelves.

Care to elaborate?

I thought cane was grown in some of the southern states.

I agree with you

However, HFCS is not a food, to sell it as such is fraud.

"All tyranny needs to gain a foothold is for people of good conscience to remain silent."
Thomas Jefferson

SteveMT's picture

Agree: Fructose is like a slow poison

Fructose Metabolism More Complicated Than Was Thought

ScienceDaily (Dec. 11, 2008) — A new University of Illinois study suggests that we may pay a price for ingesting too much fructose. According to lead author Manabu Nakamura, dietary fructose affects a wide range of genes in the liver that had not previously been identified.

Chances are you consume quite a bit of fructose. Most Americans do—in refined sugars such as sucrose or table sugar (which is half fructose) and in high-fructose corn syrup, used in products as diverse as soft drinks, protein bars, and fruit juice.

But many scientists believe that high dietary fructose contributes to the development of metabolic syndrome, a group of risk factors that predict heart disease and Type 2 diabetes.

"For this reason, it's important for scientists to understand exactly how consuming high amounts of fructose affects human health," said Nakamura, a U of I associate professor of food science and human nutrition.

Nakamura's lab is continuing to study the metabolism of fructose with an eye to making recommendations about its dietary use.

His study shows that the metabolism of fructose is more complex than the data had indicated. "Our gene-expression analysis showed that both insulin-responsive and insulin-repressive genes are induced during this process. Our bodies can do this, but it's complicated, and we may pay a price for it," he said.

According to the scientist, most carbohydrates are handled fairly simply by our bodies. They are converted quickly to glucose and used for energy or stored as fat. "When we are eating, blood sugar--and insulin production--goes up. When we sleep or fast, it goes down," he said.

The process is not so simple with fructose, he noted. "In order for fructose to be metabolized, the body has to create both fasted and fed conditions. The liver is really busy when you eat a lot of fructose."

Because, unlike glucose, fructose metabolism occurs mainly in the liver, Nakamura wanted to gain a complete picture of gene expression in the liver during fructose metabolism.

In Nakamura's study, 24 rats were fed either a 63 percent glucose or fructose diet four hours a day for two weeks; at the end of this period, half the animals fasted for 24 hours before the scientists performed a gene expression analysis; the other half were examined at the end of a four-hour feeding.

Fructose feeding not only induced a broader range of genes than had previously been identified, there were simultaneous increases in glycogen (stored glucose) and triglycerides in the liver.

"To our surprise, a key regulatory enzyme involved in the breakdown of glucose was about two times higher in the fructose-fed group than in the glucose-fed group," Nakamura said.

The study also suggests that a protein called carbohydrate response element binding protein is responsible for the fructose effect on certain genes that trigger the production of fat, he said.

"We're continuing to assess the risk of fructose insulin resistance and the consequent risk for development of diabetes," he said.

Co-authors of the study, published in a recent issue of Biochimica et Biophysica Acta, are Hyun-Young Koo, Matthew A. Wallig, Takayuki Y. Nara, and B. H. Simon Cho of the University of Illinois and Byung Hong Chung of the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081209221742.htm

That's like rebranding

That's like rebranding asbestos as lead paint.

I am out of touch with most Americans precisely because I am not out of touch with reality.

:0

opps