1 vote

Country Living Reference

I read a lot here at DP and see several people talking about a more simpler way of life if the SHTF. I thought you might find these excellent reference books of as much value as I do.

According to Wiki, there are 10 volumes of in this series, but I've only been able to locate the first 5.

Foxfire - Volume 1
hog dressing; log cabin building; mountain crafts and foods; planting by the signs; snake lore, hunting tales, faith healing; moonshining; and other affairs of plain living

Foxfire - Volume 2
ghost stories, spring wild plant foods, spinning and weaving, midwifing, burial customs, corn shuckin's, wagon making and more affairs of plain living.

Foxfire - Volume 3
animal care, banjos and dulcimers, hide tanning, summer and fall wild plant foods, butter churns, ginseng, and still more affairs of plain living.

Foxfire - Volume 4
fiddle making, springhouses, horse trading, sassafras tea, berry buckets, gardening, and further affairs of plain living

Foxfire - Volume 5
ironmaking, blacksmithing, flintrock rifles, bear hunting, and other affairs of plain living



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Foxfire books!

I had all of these books for years! They came out of the North Ga mountains. Great reference series!

"I think we are living in a world of lies: lies that don't even know they are lies, because they are the children and grandchildren of lies." ~ Chris Floyd

Back to basics!

As a amateur archaeologist/anthropologist I find the art of making the very first tools known to man very fascinating.I can work rock enough to get by and create a practical tool but nothing like these guys!Please take a minute to check out these works of art from the oldest known method of tool making.Absolutely amazing what can done with a hunk of rock!

http://flintknappers.com/

If I disappear from a discussion please forgive me. My 24-7 business requires me to split mid-sentence to serve them. I am not ducking out, I will be back later to catch up.

You are amoung many collectors as shown at your link.

An interesting study of history and quality of life; keep it up.

And never forget, “Humans, despite our artistic pretensions, our sophistication and many accomplishments, owe the fact of our existence to a six-inch layer of topsoil and the fact that it rains.”

Thanks,Yes a survival skill worth practicing

A person may some day find themselves with no modern survival tools.Knowing the basics of this skill might save your life.

If I disappear from a discussion please forgive me. My 24-7 business requires me to split mid-sentence to serve them. I am not ducking out, I will be back later to catch up.

nice

what a great site. thanks

Thanks for the compliment.

I wrote that site, so I really appreciate the kind words. :-)

awesome info!

have I told you guys these three words, today? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BQ7wftWRc7M

thanks for sharing the link.)

Excellent

We need more educational posts like this.

I use to buy the Back-Woodsman magazine - good source of info too.

cheers,

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fi69utdvDcA&feature=related

donvino

awesomeness

Foxfire is the best compilation in my opinion

I grew up on a big family farm with cousins aunts and uncles. Over the years the older ones people left us but we remember most of what we were taught. The rest we reteach ourselves with those books.

One thing I remember is the wood fire smokehouse we operated. We used bowls to catch the drippings from the meat,separated the fat then the older folks used the wood ash to make lye water. It made the best soap ever although I never cared for the smell.

Thanks, what

a great treasury of info.

"We can see with our eyes, hear with our ears and feel with our touch, but we understand with our hearts."

Thanks!

That means a lot to me coming from you! :-D