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This Internet Provider Pledges To Put Your Privacy First. ALWAYS!

This Internet Provider Pledges To Put Your Privacy First. ALWAYS!

Step aside, AT&T and Verizon. A new privacy-protecting Internet service and telephone provider still in the planning stages could become the ACLU's dream and the FBI's worst nightmare.

Nick Merrill, who challenged a demand from the FBI for user data, wants to create the world's first Internet provider designed to be surveillance-resistant.
(Credit: Sarah Tew/CNET)

Nicholas Merrill is planning to revolutionize online privacy with a concept as simple as it is ingenious: a telecommunications provider designed from its inception to shield its customers from surveillance.
Merrill, 39, who previously ran a New York-based Internet provider, told CNET that he's raising funds to launch a national "non-profit telecommunications provider dedicated to privacy, using ubiquitous encryption" that will sell mobile phone service and, for as little as $20 a month, Internet connectivity.

The ISP would not merely employ every technological means at its disposal, including encryption and limited logging, to protect its customers. It would also -- and in practice this is likely more important -- challenge government surveillance demands of dubious legality or constitutionality.

A decade of revelations has underlined the intimate relationship between many telecommunications companies and Washington officialdom. Leading providers including AT&T and Verizon handed billions of customer telephone records to the National Security Agency; only Qwest refused to participate. Verizon turned over customer data to the FBI without court orders. An AT&T whistleblower accused the company of illegally opening its network to the NSA, a practice that the U.S. Congress retroactively made legal in 2008.

By contrast, Merrill says his ISP, to be run by a non-profit called the Calyx Institute with for-profit subsidiaries, will put customers first. "Calyx will use all legal and technical means available to protect the privacy and integrity of user data," he says.

Merrill is in the unique position of being the first ISP exec to fight back against the Patriot Act's expanded police powers -- and win.

Nick Merrill says that "we will use all legal and technical means to resist having to hand over information, and aspire to be the partner in the telecommunications industry that ACLU and EFF have always needed but never had."

Continue reading more:
http://news.cnet.com/8301-31921_3-57412225-281/this-internet...

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:)

"It does not take a majority to prevail but rather an irate, tireless minority keen on setting brushfires of freedom in the minds of men."

--Samuel Adams

This looks interesting...

This looks interesting...

...

Ok, sounds good... I'm interested

however, word of caution: at one time there was a company on the internet that provided for the absolute BEST "anonymizing" of people on the internet. It was good enough to get through Chinese firewalls which is one purpose of it's creation if I remember correctly. Problem: It was ran by the CIA! NO JOKE! An article came out at the time "spilling the beans" after they took the site down.

I like the idea, but when I

I like the idea, but when I looked at riseup.net which is to be creating the software; I got a little concerned.

From their website

Riseup’s Purpose

The Riseup Collective is an autonomous body based in Seattle with collective members world wide. Our purpose is to aid in the creation of a free society, a world with freedom from want and freedom of expression, a world without oppression or hierarchy, where power is shared equally. We do this by providing communication and computer resources to allies engaged in struggles against capitalism and other forms of oppression.

Seals the deal for me.

They won't be getting a single one of my "capitalist" dimes then. Dumba$$es.