39 votes

It is now time to start looking at unbinding delegates at the state and national convention.

It appears as though Congressman Ron Paul is winning the delegate battle.

The delegates are actually who determines who is the nominee to run on the republican party ticket for President which will take place in Tampa FL later this year. The primary votes are for the most part really just a beauty contest and in most cases decides nothing.

In some states the delegates are bound to vote for a candidate based on state party rules for a certian number of ballots at the RNC convention in Tampa.

More : http://www.hermancainforums.com/index.php/topic,4237.0.html

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Organization is How We Win

If we keep the campaign funded, they can continue to hire people who know all this stuff backward and forward, and it will be a matter of communicating with supporters. (RP supporters have the technology.)

Time to work on making sure we don't do stupid stuff, like nominating too many and splitting our own vote, being obnoxious and alienating potential supporters when something bad happens, and not showing up.

What do you think? http://consequeries.com/

I am really tired of this

I am really tired of this bull$hit the last few weeks every post I make that makes the top recent comments get removed, you don't want my delegate help fine, have a nice life. Do oit yourselves daily paul, I'm out of here.

LOL

I'm sorry to laugh, because you have a legitimate reason to your gripe if indeed they're being removed. But, I just had to laugh after reading this, and then reading your "username".

I

second that :-)

Our constitution was made only for a moral and religious people. It is wholly inadequate to the government of any other.

John Adams

Someone explain please

I have downloaded the RNC rules for the 2012 Convention and I do not see how delegates unbind by abstaining.
I am not a troll. This is just too important to fuck it up.
Two rules:1
RULE NO. 15
Election, Selection, Allocation, or Binding of
Delegates and Alternate Delegates
(a) Order of Precedence.
Delegates at large and their
alternate delegates and delegates from Congressional
districts and their alternate delegates to the national
convention shall be elected, selected, allocated, or
bound in the following manner:
(1) In accordance with any
applicable Republican Party rules of a state, insofar as
the same are not inconsistent with these rules (partial copy and paste)
2:
Rule 37 (c)
(c) In balloting, if any delegation shall pass
when its name is called, then at the conclusion of the
roll call all delegations which passed shall be called in
the order herein before established. No delegation shall
be allowed to change its vote until all delegations which
passed shall have been given a second opportunity to
vote.
Thanks

Our constitution was made only for a moral and religious people. It is wholly inadequate to the government of any other.

John Adams

JJan

Delegates do not unbind by abstaining.

Abstaining is just that. Not Voting

Here look at the results in 2008

Republican National Convention Presidential nominee vote, 2008[28][29][30]
Candidate Votes Percentage
John McCain 2,343 98.44%
Ron Paul 21 0.88%
Mitt Romney 2 0.08%
Delegates that did not vote 14 0.59%
Totals 2,380 100.00%

You see that section that says Delegates that did not vote???
Those are the Delegates that practiced abstinence last cycle.

AND I just want to point out. YES we BEAT Romney in 2008!!!

AND we are going to do it again in 2012

Tampa here we come!

To arms! To arms! The Redcoats are coming!

Thnx then we will all be saying

President Paul!!!

Our constitution was made only for a moral and religious people. It is wholly inadequate to the government of any other.

John Adams

Rule 15 (a) (1) seems to me

Rule 15 (a) (1) seems to me that the delegates are bound according to state rules. So, if you change the state rules at the state convention to unbind the delegates, then I see no reason why supposedly bound Paul delegates can't vote for Paul at the national convention.

Rule 37 (c) (c) merely states that no delegate should change their vote according to the state rules unless they are given a second chance to vote (after the first ballot).

I've seen some suggestions that people vote at the national convention to unbind the delegates, but I'm not sure if that's allowed according to the national party rules.

The key here is state vs national, and the way I see it is that any given state can send a delegation to the national convention to support the candidate of its choosing.

Yes, the unbinding must take place at the State Conventions,

or whatever layer of organization placed the binding rule in effect.

If district conventions select RNC delegates directly, and the binding is from rules at that level, then that is where the unbinding needs to happen via a rule change.

If the binding is in the By-Laws for that State, or it is done via rules for the State Convention that chooses delegates, then the unbinding via a by-laws or rules change needs to happen there.

If on the other hand, the binding is by State law - forget it. That most likely can't be changed for this cycle, but it can be for the next.

If we get a plurality of delegates for Paul

then the idea is that the delegates in that state can vote to unbind themselves.

What are you fightin' for?
Caught in the middle?
Freedom is only for those with the guts to defend it!

Yes! Unbind yourselves!

Thanks for the post, I was about ready to make one myself.

What are you fightin' for?
Caught in the middle?
Freedom is only for those with the guts to defend it!

Important

BUMP!

Front page anyone?!

PLEASE!!

What are you fightin' for?
Caught in the middle?
Freedom is only for those with the guts to defend it!

you can unbind at state level or at National Convention

Conventions are the last word when it comes to rules.

Unbind or at least abstain

YES!

Something people don't realize....

At these conventions, if you have the majority, you make the rules. Literally the first thing you do other than picking a chair is accepting the rules.

The GOP of each state is a private organization. You can do whatever the heck you want!

Pottawattamie County Iowa

"Capitalism should not be condemned, since we haven't had capitalism." -Dr. Ron Paul

Not necessarily

For many state conventions, there are "Standing Rules". For instance, in my CD in Missouri there are standing rules that are passed which are in play for all future District Conventions. Changes to those rules require a 2/3 vote. Many state conventions are the same way. Suspending a rule - which can be a motion from the floor - also requires a 2/3 vote.

It is all about numbers....

"In the beginning of a change the patriot is a scarce man, and brave, and hated and scorned. When his cause succeeds, the timid join him, for then it costs nothing to be a patriot."--Mark Twain

Not True

Motions to amend the rules BEFORE THEY ARE ADOPTED only take a majority. It is AFTER they are adopted that it takes a 2/3rds vote. Often a delegation will just "approve the rules as is" because nobody has ever seen a need to change them before now. All over the USA, these rules have been getting amended BEFORE adoption and that is how many of the RP delegates are getting elected (due to changing the rules about how the ballots will be issued).

So at the state convention, the "standing rules" are nothing more than "proposed rules" that the delegatation can choose to accept as a whole, OR can amend section by section as they choose WITH ONLY A MAJORITY VOTE. Once that is done, THEN the delegation can choose to adopt the rules as those that guide their convention.

So if the proposed rules state that the delegates are bound, someone just needs to make a motion to amend them to unbind, get it second'ed, possibly open for discussion, and then vote. Majority gets it passed.

Lets dig further

You cannot make a motion to "amend" rules without needing a 2/3 vote. That is basic Roberts Rules because it is changing the votes of prior assemblies.

However, if you can get a RP Chairman elected, they can pick their own Rules Committee, the committe could then recommend to the body that the standing rules not be approved. After the existing rules are voted down (they are in play during the credentialing process, etc... before the convention chair is elected), a new set of rules is proposed and then you can vote in the change.

It is a long way around...but I don't see another way. And, this all depends what the standing rules say about changes, etc.... by state.

"In the beginning of a change the patriot is a scarce man, and brave, and hated and scorned. When his cause succeeds, the timid join him, for then it costs nothing to be a patriot."--Mark Twain

Prior assemblies cannot bind future assemblies.

A motion to adopt rules is a simple main motion and only requires a majority vote.

Only special motions like "suspend the rules" requires a 2/3.

And then, that only means to suspend the rules already adopted by a majority vote. (and/or those contained in Robert's if that is included in the By-Laws for procedure)

So, initially, a 2/3 vote is needed to suspend Robert's. Then, only a majority is needed to pass special or specific rules that function for that convention or assembly. Once those are passed though, it then takes a 2/3 vote to change or suspend them.

Standing rules merely are "automatic" rules proposals. They can be changed with only a majority vote prior to formal adoption at the start of the assembly. This is because amendments only require a majority to pass.

That point is in that article

That point is in that article as well. first we try state then we can try again at national.

bump for importance.

bump for importance.

bump this we need to do this

bump this we need to do this at every convention