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Food Storage - How much will you need?

I ran across this handy food calculator and thought I would share.

http://www.thefoodguys.com/foodcalc.html

You simply plug the number of people in the household and it gives you an estimate of the amount of food that will need to be stored for a year supply.

Of course, you can tweak the foods to suit your cooking style & family needs. I think it's great for those who garden/can their own foods as it gives an idea of how much you may use in a year (I keep a "canning bible" and take notes of anything that I ran out of so that I may plan for more the next year). My best advice is to store only the things you normally prepare and eat. For instance, I, myself, wouldn't buy wheat in bulk since I don't normally grind my own flour and figure that if life hands me a situation that warrants relying on my food storage, I simply won't have much extra time to dedicate to added preparation. Your situation may be different, just do what works for you.

I think it's important that people try to keep at least a 2 week food supply on hand, you never know what tomorrow will bring. Storms, quakes, floods, unexpected job loss, or many other scenarios could make purchasing food difficult or impossible. A little extra can go a long way!

Wishing you the best!
Glory



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The calculator is useful, however

it ignores meat. Dried, canned, and salt cured meat, to include wild game, historically made up a lot of protein and calories for families in rural America. Of course, long term storage isn't necessary for some game (i.e., squirrels and rabbits) as you eat the entire animal at a single setting. Just some food for thought.

Magna est veritas, et prevalebit. Truth is most powerful, and will ultimately prevail.

Air tightgreen houses and bees

Genetically inserted and self perpetuating insecticide is polluting the water,
http://www.naturalnews.com/030959_GM_corn_insecticides.html

It is polluting the air, Mexico where genetically modified corn is illegal but brought in by the wind compared it to tareing down an old cathedral and replacing it with a McDonald’s,
http://www.organicconsumers.org/Corn/spreadofGECorn.cfm

Hearty traits like plants that can kill insect pests, has great advantages over natural breads, and can spread from on species to another,
http://www.plosbiology.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjo...

Even so called wild bees consume corn syrup from discarded soda cans,

Coughing, choking and sneezing are not diseases but the bodies natural desire to remove objects from ones nose and throat. Beehive collapse syndrome where sick bees flee the hive is the way beehives avoid mass pandemics. Teaching bees to ignore insecticide but not disease would be tricky and failure could totally destroy biodiversity on our planet, Some bees and some air tight green houses could be handy,
http://readersupportednews.org/pm-section/27-27/11025-bee-co...

To change the subject

Saving up old plastic water bottles would be handy and planting them randomly as well. The ones for others just take some non scented bleach no Clorox and stick a butter knife into it shake the knife than poke it in the filled plastic water bottle.

This would be especially helpful if Yellowstone National Park blows its top. Old Faithful Geyser becoming an active volcano. The eruption might be the biggest in human history, the next big one. Unlike with the sinking of the Titanic, “the Year Without a Summer”is a talk-show tidbit. People around the world not fearing the starvation that occurred that year. Check out PBS “SuperVocano”, [sometimes when I have trouble clicking a link I can often Google it],
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-1350123/World...
By the way vacant lots highway shoulders might have turnip greens and kale planted on them though dandelion is also helpful and potatoes can be discreetly planted in-between.

In Philly PA RichardKanePA

If the S really HTF,

there will be alarming food shortages, even in farming areas. There will be many people who are desperate for food and will do desperate things to get it. During a prolonged shortage armed roving gangs will almost certainly form to pillage neighborhoods. Some of them may actually contain police officers who have abandoned their posts. Governments on various levels may themselves decide to conduct mandatory "food collections" under the guise of feeding the masses.

Sitting on a pile of food and trying to defend it may spell a death sentence, yet I advocate having as much stored food as you can. You will need this food to buy allegiance from enough people to guard it. A nuclear family will stand no chance against a determined armed gang. You need to sleep and when you do they will attack. Only by banding together with enough defense-capable people can you hope to repel the pillagers. Even then you may be overwhelmed by an army of raiders.

When you are overwhelmed you need to have a fallback position. This means you will need to have storage foods pre-positioned at various locations. One food cache is easier to keep watch on than several widely scattered caches. Thieves could raid your off-site caches with no resistance. Therefore you will need to hide your food caches. My method is to bury food and armaments, etc. in completely hermetically-sealed waterproof containers. I made mine from large-diameter PVC pipe sections and fittings, lined with heat-sealed Mylar bags. I'll do the same in the vicinity of my Ecuador property.

New Hampshire and Ecuador.

Well done

This is exactly the way it will be. If you have a very good defendable position on top of a mountain with cliffs all around it you may stand a chance at defending it. Anything less will fail. This has been known for centuries past.

If I disappear from a discussion please forgive me. My 24-7 business requires me to split mid-sentence to serve them. I am not ducking out, I will be back later to catch up.

Realistically speaking

for a survival scenario, you need at least enough to get you thru to the next planting season until you can get something out of the spring crops.
And have seeds for the spring crops, so you can plant.

That's minimum, IMO.

You're right

I think it's a good idea to have an heirloom seed cache on hand if people have the space to grow a garden. It's a great "food insurance" plan.

2 weeks is a good start

but not enough in my opinion. When Dr. Paul says bad times are headed our way, I put stock in that, food stock that is.

-Jacky
TX

I agree!

I have a feeling that we are in the calm before the storm.