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Grammar Tests for 11 year olds in UK - Can you pass the test?

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/educationnews/9380154/B...

Sample Questions.

Have fun and good luck!!! :D




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This is not fair! They speak Englamish in England.

We speak American. Two completely different languages.

Certain issues seem to divide us at the DP

I hope this isn't another one: the SERIAL COMMA, otherwise known as the "Oxford" or "Harvard" comma (cough). In short, it's the use of a comma after each item in a series.

In my book, there should have been a comma after the word "jam" in the test example that reads, "The shopping list said he should buy bread, butter, jam and tea."

One of the reasons to use the serial comma is to prevent ambiguity. A typical example is a book dedication that reads: "To my parents, Ayn Rand and God."
(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serial_comma)

We all agree about the serial comma, right? :D

When we try to pick out anything by itself, we find it hitched to everything else in the Universe.
~ John Muir

Linda Cross's picture

Exceptional parents, lol.

I do recall being taught in elementary school, some 50 years ago, that the comma after the last word in a series was optional.

If you see something, say something, the government is listening.
Silence isn't golden, it's yellow.

What in the world...

that is pretty basic.

I read in the latest Nat'l Geographic that penmanship is going by the wayside - both cursive and manuscript being replaced by keyboard aptitude.

The word drone keeps coming to mind...reminds me of the video, Another Brick in the Wall by Pink Floyd. Such foresight they had. Education takes many forms...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EZEHm8eEb9E

The law cannot make a wicked person virtuous…God’s grace alone can accomplish such a thing.
Ron Paul - The Revolution

Setting a good example is a far better way to spread ideals than through force of arms. Ron Paul

Can you get these right?

It did not test for some of the most common elementary mistakes.

o Complete the following sentence with "I" or "me."

John did not send an invitation to Mary and __.

(one mark)

o Complete the following sentence with "who" or "whom."

Mrs. Rino called a policeman ____ she had hired for security.

(one mark)

Ĵīɣȩ Ɖåđşŏń

"Fully half the quotations found on the internet are either mis-attributed, or outright fabrications." - Abraham Lincoln

Mrs. Rino called a policeman

Mrs. Rino called a policeman she had hired for security.

No need to use who or whom. :)

School's fine. Just don't let it get in the way of thinking. -Me

Study nature, not books. -Walton F. Dutton

Sorry

Minus one mark.

Ĵīɣȩ Ɖåđşŏń

"Fully half the quotations found on the internet are either mis-attributed, or outright fabrications." - Abraham Lincoln

Ain't a need to be sorry,

Ain't a need to be sorry, Jive. No minus for you, buddy. Carry on. :) And, yes, I know ain't ain't a word. But I like it! lol

School's fine. Just don't let it get in the way of thinking. -Me

Study nature, not books. -Walton F. Dutton

Susie 4 Liberty's picture

Oh, I don't think most people could pass this...

My age group (growing 'olden') had English teachers who were adamant about our ability to diagram sentences, and to this day, I use that technique in my mind in order to determine whether my sentence structure is correct. (And my MOTHER was an exceptional teacher in this regard!)

I often see errors in newspaper articles, and I'm always surprised they were missed by the so-called "Editor".

Susie 4 Liberty

editor

The word editor is not a proper noun, a noun that's capitalized such as a name. No need to capitalize it unless it's the first word in a sentence. Same goes for the word president. If president is capitalized when it's not the first word in a sentence, it's capitalized when a name follows it, such as President Ron Paul will be addressing congress this morning to....

School's fine. Just don't let it get in the way of thinking. -Me

Study nature, not books. -Walton F. Dutton

Central planning education at it's best !

Seems more like a 9 year old test.

at "it's" best?

Click for proper use of "it's."

Ĵīɣȩ Ɖåđşŏń

"Fully half the quotations found on the internet are either mis-attributed, or outright fabrications." - Abraham Lincoln

Seems like a 9-year-old's

Seems like a 9-year-old's test. :P Anyway.

DPers should take that test. I hope they leave it knowing how to use commas and semi colons.

COMMAS:

A simple series is without a comma before and:

Ron Paul is cool, awesome and rad

In complex series, a comma is before and:

Ron Paul is cool, awesome and super duper suave, and *he's a master of logic and rationality. When a *subject is after a simple series following and, a comma is required. This example is one among several examples of complex series. Excluding the subject, the sentence would be

Ron Paul is cool, awesome and super duper suave and is a master of logic and rationality.

or

Ron Paul is cool, awesome, super duper suave and a master of logic and rationality.

SEMI COLONS:

1. In a series after a colon
2. Used to separate independent clauses, as in

Ron Paul was inducted into congress' baseball Hall of Fame; there's no doubt he accepted this accolade how he received all other commendations, gratefully and in support of being yourself.

*ABBA steps away from the chalk board and returns to his chair and desk*

School's fine. Just don't let it get in the way of thinking. -Me

Study nature, not books. -Walton F. Dutton

its

its best.

Colchester, New London County, Connecticut

Susie 4 Liberty's picture

And that depends on that to which you're referring...

It is best that you go now. It's best that you go now.

Or All we can expect from a young child is its best. (Would make no sense to say "it is best" which is what we'd have written had we used the apostrophe.)

Susie 4 Liberty

Pronouns

All we can expect from a young child is its best.

Well, when a pronoun is used for a human, it should be "he" or "she," not "it." The pronoun it is used for animals without names and inanimate objects because it is subordinate to pronouns he and she.

Often the pronouns that and which are used for humans too. Their misuse is fairly widespread. The rules for those two pronouns are the same as those for its -- for animals without names and inanimate objects such as machinery, a company or a group. The pronouns for humans and named animals are: he, she, we, us, they, them, who, whom and their reflexives.

Fun fact: Despite native English speakers losing their grasp on their language, the native Chinese speaker without education uses the pronouns above correctly in his language. I attribute this use to language character distinction.

When a Chinese speaker learns English, I've noticed routinely he uses the English equivalent pronouns correctly and that he gets agitated at their misuse because their misuse means the human is a subordinate. If a Chinese person knows he's talking with someone who knows language well enough and who uses that instead of who, the Chinese person will receive that misuse as an insult. Additionally, I've noticed people of other countries repel improper pronoun uses. I think they repel the misuse for the same reason.

School's fine. Just don't let it get in the way of thinking. -Me

Study nature, not books. -Walton F. Dutton

Aphrodite is referring to Jive Dadson's question

above, and she is correct.

Correct

Good eye!

School's fine. Just don't let it get in the way of thinking. -Me

Study nature, not books. -Walton F. Dutton