6 votes

The Ordinary Nickel, Not Yet Debased Currency.

Was just checking coinflation.com and the US nickel (1946-2012) is actually worth more than face value. $1,000 worth of nickels is worth $1,072 melt value. Obviously, they're very liquid at face value. I suspect that at some point, the government is going to debase these by putting zinc in them at some point in the future. So, if you want a metal coin that's highly liquid, doesn't cost any premium to acquire, and would still be worth something after the economic collapse, nickels might be the way to go. If you got one of those 5 gallon jugs full of various coins, you should roll them and buy a bunch of nickels and put them in there instead. (Except 1981 and older pennies, those are worth almost 2.5x face value and pre-1965 coins)

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Nickels are a better hedge

Nickels are a better hedge against inflation than paper money but not by much.Copper is a much better poor man's hedge and will keep up with inflation.Pre 1983 pennies are worth three times(300% verse nickel 20%) their face value and they will increase much more than nickel.You are much better off with silver dimes and quarters or silver bullion coins but if you don't have much money I would recommend copper pennies.Just go to the bank and get a box of rolled pennies and pick out the pre 1983 pennies and bring the rest back.That is best for someone who has very little fiat to invest.

you could buy

War nickels at you coin store that have 35% silver. I think it rather interesting that in WW2 all nickels were called back for the war. Wounder if the same will happen for silver in the future?

His name is Edward Snowden

What is Capitalism?
http://youtu.be/yNF09pUPypw

it has hovered around 6 cents in the last year

read this article:

Save your nickels. Mass inflation ahead.

http://www.lewrockwell.com/orig10/rawles1.1.1.html

That $72 difference isn't profit

it would cost way more than $72 to melt them down. Not to mention the time and gas needed to get them from the bank...

However, pre-1982 pennies are great to horde for melt value (yes it's legal to melt them).

9-11 was a panda job.

Not true

or everyone would be doing it

http://www.usatoday.com/money/2006-12-14-melting-ban-usat_x.htm

A nation of sheep breeds a government of wolves.

Where in this story

is a link to this supposed law?

And why hasn't the DP banned advertisers who sell coins at 'near-melt'?

9-11 was a panda job.

BTW - anyone

know about the face - melt value of Canadian coins?

I know about the silver ones, but what about the pennies, nickels
and such?

Well you wouldn't need to melt them down to trade with them

Besides surely melting them is illegal? Is in my country...

Also its $72 now that'll only go up with inflation the important point is that they have real metal value...