7 votes

Tor Project Government Funds Audit Report 2011

Yet another interesting finding on Cryptome, October 6, 2012 :

"Privacy, anonymity and security services are deceptive, protect yourself."

Tor Project Government Funds Audit Report 2011

http://cryptome.org/2012/10/tor-audit-2011.pdf

(See page 3 of the report / form)

Who knew the "Tor Project : Anonymity Online" was (partially) government funded ?!

I mean ... W o a ! rather.. er... unexpected !

https://www.torproject.org/

Who knew, indeed ? Well... Not I !

So, let me get this straight :

DEAR government cares SO MUCH about the 1st Amendment that it funds a project a purpose of which is to precisely defeat ... its OWN observably increasing surveillance of individuals otherwise ?

Er... Please tell me :

WHY do I feel something DOES NOT quite ... ADD UP, there ?!

See also, for useful correlation :

Tor Project Financial Report 2011

http://cryptome.org/2012/10/tor-financial-2011.pdf

By Moody, Famiglietti, & Andronico

Certified Public Accountants & Consultants



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Cyril's picture

UPDATE. A Tor user defends Tor's legitimacy and usefulness

Just thought I should share for completeness :

http://cryptome.org/2012/10/tor-letter.htm

Well, okay, frihetnull @ tormail dot org.

Acknowlegded. Thanks.

"Cyril" pronounced "see real". I code stuff.

http://Laissez-Faire.Me/Liberty

"To study and not think is a waste. To think and not study is dangerous." -- Confucius

Gets even more interesting...

Firstly, but not my main point, if you compare the financial report to the audit it reveals that Tor's operating expenses pretty much match the amount the Govt grants to Tor.

But to my main point, there is one known and proven way to break the anonymity of Tor and to monitor activity ---> Bitcoin mining :>

http://anonymity-in-bitcoin.blogspot.com/2011/07/bitcoin-is-...

And things get even more interesting. Bitcoin'ers and Tor users are precisely a group the Govt would want to surveil and keep tabs on...

.
~wobbles but doesn't fall down~

Read The History Of Tor

If you read the history of Tor¹ you will see that it initially created and funded by the US Naval Research Laboratory. Tor now gets funding from U.S. State Department, the Broadcasting Board of Governors, and the National Science Foundation.

Turned out this anonymity network can be useful for not only military personell but also citizens.

¹ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tor_%28anonymity_network%29#History


Cyril's picture

I knew that there were public funds.

I knew that there were public funds.

What I didn't know was about the U.S. State Department.

And when I know the latter contains someone like Mrs. Hillary Clinton, so zealous to send people to go kill "terrorists" abroad, this makes me look at their care for protecting our anonymity...

... entirely differently.

Granted.

Everything is relative. The human factor, to begin with.

Knowing technology a bit, I know it's foolish to put all our safety in it alone. Man is always the weakest link.

Hence, why we choose who is to babysit our kids, for a much simpler example.

Makes sense ?

Peace.

"Cyril" pronounced "see real". I code stuff.

http://Laissez-Faire.Me/Liberty

"To study and not think is a waste. To think and not study is dangerous." -- Confucius

I had no idea.

Thanks for the wake-up call. I'm not sure about my conclusions yet, but I think I'll be looking deeper into this.

How did it come to your attention? What's your analysis?

Cyril's picture

My attention ?

My attention ?

I'm not a fan of wikileaks, at all.

But I trust Cryptome. For I know that they know for a long time they are under FBI surveillance, they disclosed it with no fear, and since they don't break any laws, and aren't sensationalists either, and the 1st Amendment seems to hold still ... their info is always good to be aware of. Whether it is always useful or how much relevant at a point in time, is another issue, of course.

But on that one :

My analysis ? I have no idea why the gov't would fund something which is "advertised" as being able to defeat the surveillance of individuals' privacy, including by the gov't...

You can't have it both ways : why would there be laws limiting the use of strong cryptography otherwise ?

It true information privacy was never a threat to so-called "national security" why would there be projects like Tor in the first place, and upper bounds put on RSA-based PK exchanges ?

As judge Judy often says : "if it makes no sense whatsoever... something isn't as it seems, and there has to be a liar somewhere."

Use your best judgement.

"Cyril" pronounced "see real". I code stuff.

http://Laissez-Faire.Me/Liberty

"To study and not think is a waste. To think and not study is dangerous." -- Confucius