36 votes

Private Prisons Rake in Billions as US Inmates Spark Low Cost Labor Boom

Who can compete with the Chinese? US prisoners can! Some of the largest private companies, as well as states, are now enjoying the fruits of a cheap and readily available work force. Private prisons spend tens of millions of dollars lobbying the government to keep jail terms long and harsh, thus adding to prisons' bottom lines.

http://youtu.be/CySzoJFkTA8

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

Just another thought.

Besides the cheap labor, think of all the money these corporations are saving on shipping alone. Nice little scam they've got going on there...

its not slavery when these people are inferior to we the people

remember that age old fallacy?

Whether you think you can or you can't, you're right. -Henry Ford

It is not just convicted prisoners.

Those who sit and wait for trial - "presumed innocent" still - are cut off from all outside contact, including their attorney, unless they can pay $11 per phone call (locally.) They must buy their own shampoo, combs, tampons! - from the privately owned commissary. To have money to spend at the commissary cost me $15 to set up the account and to put $40 on her phone card cost me $6. They have set up a monopoly where they can extract free labor from prisoners and cash from people who love them. I cannot even drop off a book - I can only ship new books direct from the publisher. Again, this was trying to interact with a prisoner BEFORE TRIAL.

Love or fear? Chose again with every breath.

It's not the fact that the inmates are working that bugs me

It's the fact that many of those inmates are there because of drug laws and discrimination, and the fact that judges have gotten caught taking bribes to fill the prisons, and the whole justice system is full of slimeball crooks who know exactly what's going on and rather than expose the corruption, they advance it.

And the corporations fund that corruption and we fund the corporations because we're all unaware of who's doing what and most of us are so poor we can't afford the local, organic, artisan choice all the time. So we are slaves to the corporations in our own way.

Prisoners are supposed to be treated as slaves,

Prisoners are supposed to be treated as slaves, it's directly from the 13th amendment.

"Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction."

DULY CONVICTED

You seem to miss that these people have not all been "duly convicted." Furthermore, many who get convicted are innocent any way.

Love or fear? Chose again with every breath.

The scumbags...

have legalized slave labor!

When Fascism goes to sleep, it checks under the bed for Ron Paul!

Shocked

People out there are stressed to the max striving to make ends meet and pay the taxes and then some corps move in on something like this?

I did not have really a good day today and to see this and I am surprisingly stumped I do not have many words to describe this. lol

Even the pro-skills arguments are suspect? How are one of these persons ever going to pass a background check?

People seriously need to give their heads a shake.

Can we imagine what foreign markets are going to do to people to even further lower costs? Since these are quasi-government products being manufactured they should be labeled as such imo.

donvino

Cyril's picture

I feel you. Disgusting indeed.

I feel you. Disgusting indeed.

Tell me about Moral Hazard.

Now you understand better how dear gov't is not such in a hurry, AT ALL, to empty prisons and release the non-violent marijuana "criminals" ...

because with the help of cronies, they may be able to actually "boost" the economy, via...

"SLAVES, Inc." ... Hello, shareholders ! ("slaveholders" ?)

Farewell, 13th Amendment !

"Cyril" pronounced "see real". I code stuff.

http://Laissez-Faire.Me/Liberty

"To study and not think is a waste. To think and not study is dangerous." -- Confucius

Slaves Inc - with judges as stock holders.

Most attorneys and judges around here hold stock in the prison for profit corporation that runs our jails. How is that for some "moral hazard" with a topping of "conflict of interest?"

Love or fear? Chose again with every breath.

ahh

Looks like the question of slavery is upon us once again. It seems to be one of those eternal questions about freedom, and natural born rights. These prisons are nothing more but institutionalized slave farms. How ironic is it that so many celebrate a movie like Lincoln who abolished slavery yet slavery persists under the guise of safety right under our very nose. As Dr Paul once bravely said, the walls around our border if built can be used to keep all of us in. The average American is now encapsulated physically as well as mentally in an unaware state of what the modern day Republic represents at home and abroad. Are not these well built, well guarded corporate gulags a warning for what the future may bring us all? Lincoln knew the price of freedom, the question is will Americans remember. Perhaps the ultimate freedom of enslaving others is an all too evil freedom to be allowed to be perpetuated knowingly. Men have fought and died for a naturally born freedom of equality towards one another, no less, no more.

insidious

.

the stranger's picture

Step 2

2. Create a gulag

Sickening

It's amazing we still hear politicians refer to America as the "freest country in the world" when we have the highest incarceration rate and we essentially have slave labor of those being incarcerated (while those who aren't are paying through the nose in taxes).

Private prison lobbyists secure fascist profits

After these lobbyists cut deals with legislators to get laws written that will meet their penalty-preference profiles; they then capture and enslave their cheap labor resources and share their profits with the government entities that enabled them. Middle-class jobs are stolen by these fascistic enterprises; driving more of them towards the same outcome.

What pathetic scoundrels!

Find out just what any people will quietly submit to and you have the exact measure of the injustice and wrong which will be imposed on them. - Frederick Douglass

I don't see a problem with

I don't see a problem with prison labor if it's voluntary and truly competitive (open to any company who would like to utilize this labor force) - but that isn't the case.

I think the proceeds should go directly to the cost of operating the prison, and the contracts to accept should be chosen by the prisoners with some approval by the prison maybe?

Very tricky thing to get right I think but it's possible.

- Grow Mushrooms at Home
http://subfarms.com

We have to ask ourselves,

We have to ask ourselves, even in the case, and assuming if, all these inmates are convicted and guilty, what is the point of the prison system?

To punish, or to reform?

It is a combination of both. However, I don't think inmates should be doing this kind of labor. Certainly not for corporations. This provides an incentive to jail people.

Limited community service I am for, but only becuase that aids in the rehabilitation process.

Plan for eliminating the national debt in 10-20 years:

Overview: http://rolexian.wordpress.com/2010/09/12/my-plan-for-reducin...

Specific cuts; defense spending: http://rolexian.wordpress.com/2011/01/03/more-detailed-look-a

I wouldn't see a problem with it if they were all real criminals

but with victimless crimes one can't be sure.

Since they aren't I oppose this no but if the law were different?

I personally think real criminals who violate others should labour as part of their punishment and most money they make taxed to fund the prisons, police and court systems. Slavery? Why should we be tax slaves to house criminals, they should work for their bread and butter, if they want any of it. Maybe it should be more free market food costs x amount of money, you can work for it here... They should pay for the justice system they make necessary.

!!!

I would say that your industry has not been affected by this then...
It's not about them working, it's about them taking jobs from law abiding citizens!

When Fascism goes to sleep, it checks under the bed for Ron Paul!

what about Bastoy Prison Island?

that's a good point...

but humor me for a minute..

funding the prisons takes money from law abiding citizens too right? I mean the money comes from somewhere... maybe not as much but it does.

As it turns out, rehabilitation works better than retribution. Look at what they do with prisoners in Norway for example...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A1mhhtpmXfo

I'm not convinced it's the privatization that is the root of this very real problem. I think it's, as always, government - corporation alliances like contracts without proper competition, or lobbying to fill up the prisons. Our prison system is unbelievably corrupt, all the way to the judges (like this bastard: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H8JRMGP2hg8 )

I'm just saying there is remediation value to learning a trade while in prison, and there must be a way to make this work without encouraging incarceration or destroying an otherwise healthy non-incarcerated labor force.

- Grow Mushrooms at Home
http://subfarms.com

Have you

ever been in prison?

Rehabilitation is one thing, but to make my industry compete with inmate industry is criminal!

When Fascism goes to sleep, it checks under the bed for Ron Paul!

The problem

lies in the private prisons influencing drug laws that get non-violent drug offenders locked up for absurd amounts of times so that the same organizations can sell their cheap(er) labor. And even if you negate the lobbyist argument, prison labor still seems like a market distortion. If a prisoner is given the choice of A) Being locked in a cage with potentially violent individuals for no pay or B) Doing manual labor for 25 cents an hour, my guess is they'll choose B). So this labor price isn't a reflection of the market labor price that exists outside of the isolated conditions in prison. So I still wouldn't agree with prison labor competing with free market labor because it involves the state using its monopoly of force

The power to destroy a thing is the absolute control over it

Bump

and I hope the very few folks who down-vote my posts and comments bump it up as well.

LL on Twitter: http://twitter.com/LibertyPoet
sometimes LL can suck & sometimes LL rocks!
http://www.dailypaul.com/203008/south-carolina-battle-of-cow...
Love won! Deliverance from Tyranny is on the way! Col. 2:13-15