7 votes

How about a good story for a change? My personal involvement...

To my fellow DP readers,

I wanted to share a personal story to let you know small business and american might is still alive in this country.

Today we ran a press release found at the link below announcing the first Awassi sheep born in the United States. Well, for most of you this may be meaningless but the Awassi sheep are highly sought after in the Middle East for meat, wool and milk production. We were told by big US agriculture universities and large dairy operations that we would not be successful importing these new sheep genetics to the United States.

So, take the small dairy farmer, hard earned sweat equity money, the will to not listen to nay sayers and the tenacity to follow through with an American dream to bring these beautiful sheep to the USA. This is exactly what Karras Farm has accomplished and I have to say I'm very proud to have been a part of the dairy sheep history of the United States. As Dr. Paul would say " let the free market decide winners and loosers " Hope and pray that the US free market wants Awassi dairy sheep as much as we do.

Thanks for looking and I wish you all a fantastic 2013.

http://www.prweb.com/releases/2013/1/prweb10278968.htm



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Totally AWESOME!

Made my day!!

Cool...

Good Luck to you.

ytc's picture

Are Awassi sheep or the hybrid generation suitable for

rainy Northwest states, like WA & OR? Do they have wool products etc for sale on-line?

What an exciting prospect! Thanks for the reminder that life goes on way beyond AJ tempest (in a teapot;)!

Awassi sheep and the

Assaf sheep cross are both excellent for your climate. These sheep were typically raised in the desert where extreme climate changes are a regular occurance. The Awassi have amazed me over the past year with their adapability compared to our East Friesian sheep. The East Friesian is an excellent milk sheep but they are fragile sheep in comparison to the Awassi. The hardiness of the Awassi coupled with the milk production make them a perfect fit for sheep operations across the broad climate range we have in the US. Our Awassi strain is considered the new and improved Awassi sheep which has been genetically selected for milk production and strong physiology. Many Awassi breeders produce the old strain Awassi which are a meat sheep only. We specialize in dairy sheep so the milk production is what we value most. Thanks for the question and all of the encouraging comments!

Finally pissed off enough to spread the word of Dr. Paul
Here's song I wrote for a close friend and wounded Iraq war veteran:
http://www.reverbnation.com/play_now/song_8738783

ytc's picture

Fascinating!

I've never heard of "dairy sheep" before. What does the milk taste like? Like goat milk? Do you make cheese with it?

BMWJIM's picture

Very

Cool!

1976-1982 USMC, Having my hands in the soil keeps me from soiling my hands on useless politicians.

You are PROUD to be a sheep

farmer? I AM PROUD OF YOU!!!
Awesome story!
lol!

Love or fear? Choose again with every breath.