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A story I've never told before

Today I read this article on the Daily Paul.

http://www.dailypaul.com/274486/eric-holder-banning-homescho...

It reminded me of an incident that took place in my high school when I was in 10th grade. Weather or not this story is true is for you to decide.

When I was a student at West Mifflin High School, I had a great Algebra teacher in 9th grade. It upsets me that I cannot remember his name. It's been 17 years since these events.

When I was a sophomore, this algebra teacher died early on in the school year. It was October or November. I'm not really sure. But what I remember most about these events was the civil liberty violation that I witnessed because of his death. The irony is that it was committed by a civics teacher. I do remember his name.

The day after the death of this teacher, a small group of students gathered around the flag pole across the driveway that lead to the entrance of the school. They stood there silently, hand in hand, praying. It was the civics teacher that broke up this moment of prayer, even though no students had been allowed into the building yet. At that school, the students had to wait outside after the bus dropped us off, and then everyone would go in at the same time. So it was taking place in non-class time and outdoors.

Later in life, as I came to understand the 1st Amendment, specifically the clause, "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof.." This civics teacher prohibited the free exercise of these students right to pray.

I know that school prayer is a hot topic, but quite frankly, praying doesn't hurt anybody. It has always bothered me.



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Giving respect.

Giving respect cannot be taken away. Least not to my belief.

Disclaimer: Mark Twain (1835-1910-To be continued) is unlicensed. His river pilot's license went delinquent in 1862. Caution advised. Daily Paul