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Pledge of Allegiance defined!

ENJOY!!

[I]
You; Natural Person; American Citizen; Human Being

[PLEDGE]
An item of property given as security for a debt or performance; bailment; surety

[ALLEGIANCE]
The obligation of a feudal vassal to his liege lord; the fidelity owed by a subject or citizen to a sovereign or government

[TO]
In a direction toward so as to reach; movement towards

[THE]
Used to refer to a person, place or thing that is unique

[FLAG]
A piece of cloth, usually rectangular, of distinctive color and design, used as a symbol, standard, signal, or emblem

[OF]
Used as a function word to indicate origin or derivation, point of reckoning, cause, motive or reason

[THE]
Used to refer to a person, place or thing that is unique

[UNITED STATES]
Federal Corporation located in the District of Columbia; debtor with place of business in the District of Columbia by which governmental affairs are conducted

[OF]
Used as a function word to indicate origin or derivation, point of reckoning, cause, motive or reason

[AMERICA]
The United States; either continent of the western hemisphere (North America or South America)

[AND]
Used to connect words of the same part of speech, clauses, or sentences that are to be taken jointly

[TO]
In a direction toward so as to reach; movement towards

[THE]
Used to refer to a person, place or thing that is unique

[REPUBLIC]
A form of government where the law-makers and administrators are chosen by the people and not the king or queen, or chosen thereby; system of government in which the people hold sovereign power and elect representatives who exercise that power; a state without a monarch

[FOR]
Used to indicate the purpose, destination, recipient or amount of something

[WHICH]
Used as a function word to introduce a nonrestrictive relative clause and to modify a noun in that clause and to refer together with that noun to a word or word group in a preceding clause or to an entire preceding clause or sentence or longer unit of discourse

[IT]
Used as subject or direct object or indirect object of a verb or object of a preposition usually in reference to a lifeless thing

[STANDS]
Represents; to be a symbol for; as a sign or symbol of

[ONE]
Being a single entity, unit, object, or living being; characterized by unity; undivided; of the same kind or quality; forming a single entity of two or more components

[NATION]
A distinct group or race of people that share history, traditions and culture; independent bodies politic; societies of men united together for the purpose of promoting their mutual safety and advantage by the joint efforts of their combined strength.

[UNDER]
In a lower position or place than; less than; smaller than; subject to the authority, rule or control of; subject to the supervision, instruction, or influence of; subordinate

[GOD]
The words in the Pledge of Allegiance 'under God' were inserted by President Dwight Eisenhower in 1954. Most of the early presidents (at least the first three) are Deists. The writers of the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution believed individuals had certain God given rights and it was the duty of Government to protect those rights. One of those rights was freedom from religious political domination. The following quotation was drafted in 1796 by George Washington and signed by John Adams in the Treaty of Tripoli (Article 11):
“As the Government of the United States of America is not, in any sense, founded on the Christian religion; as it has in itself no character of enmity against the laws, religion, or tranquillity, of Mussulmen; and, as the said States never entered into any war, or act of hostility against any Mahometan nation, it is declared by the parties, that no pretext arising from religious opinions, shall ever produce an interruption of the harmony existing between the two countries.”
The Founding Fathers wanted a nation where people could freely worship in faith. They had faced persecution in England and other nations for religion. They wanted to remedy that here. The main concern was fairness and equality under the law.
On July 11, 1954, just one month after the phrase "under God" was incorporated into the Pledge of Allegiance the U.S. Congress enacted Public Law 84-140, which required the motto on all coins and currency. The law was approved by President Eisenhower on July 30, 1956, and the motto was progressively added to paper money over a period from 1957 to 1966. In 1956 the phrase was legally adopted as the United States' national motto by a law passed by the 84th United States Congress (Public Law 84-851), and the United States Code at 36 U.S.C.§ 302 now states: "'In God we trust' is the national motto."
The Pledge of Allegiance was written in 1892 by Francis Bellamy. Bellamy's original Pledge read as follows: I pledge allegiance to my Flag and the Republic for which it stands, one nation indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.

[INDIVISIBLE]
That which cannot be separated; close; impartible; incapable of being divided; incapable of being separated; indiscerptible; inseverable; one; united

[WITH]
Used as a function word to indicate a participant in an action, transaction, or arrangement; used as a function word to indicate combination, accompaniment, presence, or addition

[LIBERTY]
The quality or state of being free; the power to do as one pleases; freedom from physical restraint;
freedom from arbitrary or despotic control; the positive enjoyment of various social, political, or economic rights and privileges; the power of choice

[AND]
Used to connect words of the same part of speech, clauses, or sentences that are to be taken jointly

[JUSTICE]
the maintenance or administration of what is just especially by the impartial adjustment of conflicting claims or the assignment of merited rewards or punishments; judge; the administration of law; especially : the establishment or determination of rights according to the rules of law or equity

[FOR]
Used to indicate the purpose, destination, recipient or amount of something

[ALL]
The whole amount, quantity, or extent of; as much as possible; every member or individual component of; the whole number or sum of; all manner of hardship; any whatever; nothing but

Peace and Love first.



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"What if the American people learn the truth" - Ron Paul

That's really spelling it out

Well, time to buy more paper/ink.. I guess I'll never get a break.

"What if the American people learn the truth" - Ron Paul