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The Chart That Tells You All You Need To Know About Gold

"When a picture is worth..."

The Chart That Tells You All You Need To Know About Gold

The chart and comments from 56-year market veteran and analyst Ron Rosen:

On King World News Blog:

http://kingworldnews.com/kingworldnews/KWN_DailyWeb/Entries/...

Also, on Jim Sinclair's MineSet:

http://www.jsmineset.com/2013/02/20/the-chart-that-tells-you...



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Cyril's picture

Hey, thanks for this bumpin' rampage, fonzdrew! ;)

Hey, thanks for this bumpin' rampage, fonzdrew! ;)

Appreciated!

"Cyril" pronounced "see real". I code stuff.

http://Laissez-Faire.Me/Liberty

"To study and not think is a waste. To think and not study is dangerous." -- Confucius

Just returning the favor. :)

You do the same for me buddy. :)

Interesting

It occurs to me that computers are perhaps more predictable than humans. Perhaps he has found the pattern in their paper games that wag the physical market?

Love or fear? Choose again with every breath.

Your comment was interesting

Your comment was interesting to me (as usual fishy). Yeah, classical computers (like the ones we all use) are completely deterministic, unless randomness is built in. But, true randomness is hard to come by in our universe. You could say that the number of neutrinos passing through a volume in an hour would be random, but I might suggest that such a phenomenon only looks random.

Now, quantum computers do appear random. Even if you boost the probability of getting the right answer to 99.999999999%, there is still a chance that it won't get the right answer. Moreover, the fundamental particles that quantum computers use seem random. But, this randomness of how things decohere is useful because so far it has allowed us to make quantum algorithms that run faster than the algorithms we currently have for certain problems on classical computers. The most striking example of such an algorithm is the quantum factoring algorithm, which can be used to break all the RSA encryption on the Internet (which is all based on factoring r=p*q).

Now, are humans quantum computers? Do our brains leverage the quantum world to use these fast algorithms? These are the questions of Roger Penrose in his "The Emperor's New Mind." I am leaning towards yes, but we dont know for sure how any of it works.

Now, to get back to the point you were making. I think that if there is a short term algorithm for the paper fleecing we experience (we already know the long term algorithm is: PRINT MORE AND REPEAT), then they would try like mad to have the patterns undetectable by classical or quantum computers. These people at the link provided above think they have found some pattern but I am not sure how I works. Perhaps the pattern isn't even based on any conspiracy. Things do seem to repeat in this universe after all (planets go around and around the sun, people make the same mistakes, etc).

Ok, now I gotta go to work. Thanks for the thought provoking comment you left!

Cyril's picture

Mystic Math friendly? :-)

Lookup "Collatz conjecture" or "Hailstone sequence" ... ;-)

Okay, courtesy of WP:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hailstone_sequence#Examples

Enjoy ! :-)

"Cyril" pronounced "see real". I code stuff.

http://Laissez-Faire.Me/Liberty

"To study and not think is a waste. To think and not study is dangerous." -- Confucius

Ever heard of "Black Shoals?"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o_UxB6EEqWo

Thanks for the kind words and interesting response!

Love or fear? Choose again with every breath.