2 votes

Question about Silver..."Preppers?"

I just noticed that a few sellers on ebay have been selling bars of silver which they clearly describe as "Silver-plated" and notate that they are not pure silver.

HOWEVER, when I look at the pictures, the bars themselves will say "Pan am" or " Sunshine Minting" or whatever else and say "One Troy ounce, Pure Silver, .999" or whatever else.

Like I said, the sellers are pretty clear that they are plated but they could be used as "preppers" or as a decoy to the real silver.

TWO QUESTIONS....First, are these bars even legal?

Second, if they are sold, what is to stop the buyer from turning around and selling them as legit? If these are out there (and before ten minutes ago, I had hoped they wouldn't be) how can the average joe like myself figure out if the coin or bar I own is truly 100% (or 99.99%) silver?

Please advise. Thanks!



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We Should Buy Silver Coins Instead

We should be buying smaller denominations of silver. Unless you plan on melting down somehow, you want something that you will be able to spend efficiently in a crisis.

In the case of a crisis, suppose you want to complete a transaction; you won't "get any change back" if you trade with a silver bar. Small denomination silver coins will be the best for trading.

Silver is silver. What if you

Silver is silver. What if you want to buy large acres of land or real estate? I would rather have the bars. Alot easier to keep up with, stores better, and easliy portable. Not saying you shouldn't buy coins just on the side, but if you are worried about surviving a crisis, stock up on food. I would say diversify with some stored food, Silver bars with some silver coins, and some gold as well.

I think it would be more

I think it would be more sensible to buy land with gold.

Please come join my forum if you're not a trendy and agree with my points of view.

you could just walk around

you could just walk around with a bar of silver, a chisel, and a weighing scale...

You can buy a test kit

and a scale. Both also available on ebay. I test every piece I buy and since I buy for melt value then I am not afraid to cut into an edge to pierce any plating for my acid test.

I have had two duds from Ebay and both times when I confronted the seller I was reimbursed in total and without question or a need to return the fake items.

I do question the legality of the plated items marked as if they are solid such as these Stagecoach bars. http://www.ebay.com/itm/4-1-TROY-OUNCE-999-FINE-SILVER-PLATE...

They look identical to the real thing. All the more reason to test everything you buy regardless of where you buy it from.

Those are some I saw.

It can be very confusing...and I can see by feedback that many are confused, thinking they are getting a great deal on silver.

All right...I think I see the difference.

.999 pure silver vs .999 fine silver.

My bad.

Fineness and purity are the

Fineness and purity are the same thing.

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Oh, LEY!

Viva Mexico in at least this regard: during their silver coinage era the purity and weight of their legal tender specie instruments were clearly marked.

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You could weigh the bar

You could weigh the bar (remember to adjust scale for Troy oz), assuming it weighed in at correct weight you could then compare the physical dimensions to other known legit fine silver bars of same weight and the dimensions should match. Also a bit more complicated would be a water displacement measurement.

So you are saying the silver plated would weigh...

The silver plated and pure silver are different masses?

But wht if they both weigh a troy ounce?

an ounce of silver clad

an ounce of silver clad copper or lead or tungsten etc will displace a different amount of water than an ounce of solid 999 silver

Really?

I will have to youtube that and watch it.

Thank you!!

Yes, the specific physical

Yes, the specific physical size of an ounce of silver/gold/etc is not equal to the specific physical size of an ounce of another metal,,,therefor it will displace a different amount of water.....if someone was trying to get really tricky, they could attempt to create an alloy (mixture of metals) to mimic the physical size and weight and then clad item in fine silver/gold/etc...

In my opinion not worth the effort to create specific alloy to mimic silver...but gold probably yes

http://www.ehow.com/how_8109592_tell-pure-using-water-displa...

I think I am going to call Sunshine Minting and ask....

I am going to ask if they really put .999 Fine Silver and yet is NOT .999 Fine Silver...or if someone else is doing it.

I always thought that if it is marked .999 it would have to be .999 silver, not plated with .999 silver.

1 oz Sunshine Mint Silver Bar

Technical Specifications
Metal: Silver
Fineness: .999
Weight: 1 troy ounce 31.1 grams
Diameter: 50.4/29.7 mm
Thickness: 2.7 mm

http://www.moderncoinmart.com/store/sunshine-minting-inc.-1-...

That one looks like all (.999) silver.

My point in this post all along is that they are selling bars that look EXACTLY like this one ("Sunshine Minting INc....999 Fine Silver") but the seller writes that it is plated.

How can that be? See?

http://www.ebay.com/itm/1-TROY-OZ-999-FINE-SILVER-PLATED-SUN...

Haha, and the bids are

Haha, and the bids are already past $20. WTF?

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yeah that is weird, but

yeah that is weird, but apparently Sunshine Minting makes "base metal" alloy blanks - http://www.sunshinemint.com/Blanks.htm

Im sure more than one person has bought these without reading carefully. You would think a respected minter would not sell plated blanks without properly identifying the fact that they are not solid on the bar..?

I just think it isn't right to put .999 fine silver...

...and not put "clad" on there as well.

These sellers might be very clear about what the buyer is buying...but what about if that buyer goes to sell? How would the average guy know better?

Why not? Maybe people want

Why not? Maybe people want decoys if they believe there will be a confiscation. I wouldn't put it past them to do it to cover their ETF shorts, and I wouldn't put it past the perpetual law-abiders to give in. It's not wrong to make a replica, but it is wrong for a person to sell a replica as the real thing. Buyer beware!

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You're right.

I just need to be careful.

Those are called German Silver

You just have to watch what you buy and make sure it says .999 pure fine silver

They do say that but are sold as silver plated.

Something just doesn't seem right about it.

Brian nailed it

If the coin says ".999 pure fine Silver" and it isn't, that seller is in some doo-doo.

I saw another post that said something about weighing the metal. That's a good strategy for bars. Some sellers have been caught red handed filling gold bars with Tungsten because of how close the 2 metals weighed.

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2012-09-23/gold-counterfeiting...

If you don't know your rights, you don't have any.

I will try to copy and paste...

But these say ".999 pure silver" but are sold as silver plated.

Silver "plated" and Pure Silver

are different and I understood that when I first read your thread. Again, as long as the seller isn't hiding anything.

Not sure why my post is faded out.

Mods? Could you shed a little light?

If you don't know your rights, you don't have any.

Why would they be illegal?

Nothing is preventing you from selling them as solid silver. That itself would be illegal to pull on someone, but these plated things aren't contraband. As far as eBay goes, you wouldn't get your money once the buyer knows it's fake, and if you sold it in person anyone who knows silver would just listen to the sound of it and know it's fake. It's really not worth it for anyone to try to sell something that's silver plated as legit solid silver. It's too much of a risk for such a small gain. Gold is mainly where you have to keep an eye out. If someone can gold plate some piece of copper, it's a much larger gain compared to the same risk.

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The stamp act makes it very

The stamp act makes it very illegal

A nation of sheep breeds a government of wolves.

What? Nope.

What? Nope.

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