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What's a good book articulating Liberty principles vs Gun Control

Over 7 months ago, some friends and I began a discussion group to educate ourselves and others on the principles of Liberty as it applies to law, economics, and life. For the first several months we doubled in size each time we met at a local bar to discuss a book topic. No offense DP, but we wanted to talk to other liberty minded folks in person and provide a real community where people could come and ask questions. As providence would have it, some celebrities of the Liberty movement have stopped by, stayed and discussed with us. Several times we've had over 20 people.

We choose our agenda through two rounds of voting. Anyone in attendance can make a nomination and brief introduction. Then we do the first round of voting, each person gets two votes. Then the two finalist proceed to the final round of voting wherein everyone has one vote. Thus far we've discussed:
The Law
Economics in One Lesson
Free to Choose
The myth of the robber barons
"war and foreign policy" chapter by Rothbard
The politics of obedience
Aftershock by Weidemer
and next month "Resistance to Tyrants"

So that's all to say, we're working on spreading the message of Liberty. We're having fun while doing it. But I need your help in educating us on gun control. Please provide an article or book that really helps frame the argument, break it down to principles, or give us helpful historical background.



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Mr. Virtual President

The best 7 minutes on gun control

When a true genius appears in the world, you may know him by this sign: that the dunces are all in confederacy against him. ~J. Swift

Books? We don't need no...

stinking books!!
There is NO REASON to read any books on the subject of gun control.
Please re-read the Constitution of the United States of America, Ammendment #2:

A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.
Now, exactly which part of "shall not be infringed" does your group not understand? Perhaps the same parts as Lindsey Graham, John McCain, Boxer, Feinstein, et al.

------------------
BC
Silence isn't always golden....sometimes it's yellow.

"The liberties of a people never were, nor ever will be, secure, when the transactions of their rulers may be concealed from them." - Patrick Henry

Thanks for the suggestions...I'll take them all

The movie "innocents betrayed" and a discussion topic of gun control, with a strong suggestion we read Louis L'amour, were nominated. The gun control discussion won.
I'll be reading North to the Rails. My late grandfather was a big Louis Lámour fan. I never connected his politics with Louis though. There may be some connection because he had nuanced conservative views that I would now call libertarian.
I really appreciate your suggestions. I checked out the new Christian book and will be looking for it when it finally goes to print.
I recommend you youtube Agenda 21 and communism.

“To Keep or Not To Keep: Why Christians Should Not Give Up Guns

This book is in the final stages and is written by Pastor Chuck Baldwin, and his son, Tim, who's a Constitutional attorney. For those of you who don't know who Chuck is, he's the most vocal voice, in the Christian church today, fighting for TRUTH, LIBERTY, and FREEDOM. He was the Constitutional party's candidate in 2008 (and may I add, was ENDORSED BY RON PAUL that year for POTUS).

Chuck is has been a long-term contributor at a great news and commentary website, www.newswithviews.com. He relocated to the Kalispell, MT area a few years ago, where he has the Liberty Fellowship church. I highly recommend watching is weekly message that is streamed live at 2:30 MST every Sunday. www.libertyfellowshipmt.com/Resources/LiveStream.aspx
You can also watch video sermon archives. I highly recommend this one - specifically addressing the gun control issue - www.libertyfellowshipmt.com/News/tabid/56/ID/54/Christs-Law-...

Pre-order the book now at www.keepyourarms.com

Book Outline

View the book outline below for the new book "To Keep Or Not To Keep".

Introduction
The Context
The Response
The Direction

Chapter 1: The Burden and Standard of Proof
Burden of Proof
Standard of Proof
Admissibility of Evidence
Magnitude of Evidence
Significance of Evidence

Chapter 2: Interpreting Scriptures
Maxim 1: The Interpretation Must Be Reasonable, Not Absurd
God Expects Man to Act More Justly Than Animals
God Requires Protection and Improvement
Maxim 2: The Greater Principle Contains the Lesser Principle
Law of Sabbath v. Law of Necessity
Jesus Extends Greater Good to Saving Life
You Cannot Please God When Your Interpretation Harms Man
Maxim 3: When an interpretation is susceptible of two meanings—one in favor of natural right and the other against it—the former is to be adopted.
God Created Human Nature: Preservation and Protection
Abraham Used Natural Right to Convince God Not to Kill Innocent People
Natural Rights Serve as Basis for Human Compassion
Old Testament Confirms Natural Rights
Israel Resisted King Saul for Violating Natural Right
Anti-Christ Denies Natural Right

Chapter 3: Scriptural Comparatives of the Right to Keep Arms
Argument 1. “Do Not Resist Evil”
Jesus Shows When Killing is Justified
Jesus Responds to Specific Conditions
Jesus Uses Old Testament Term to Illustrate Christian Doctrine
Turn the Other Cheek
Eye for Eye, Etc.
Love Thy Enemy
Argument 2: “Do Not Render Evil for Evil
1 Thessalonians chapter 5
1 Peter chapter 3
Romans chapter 12
Argument 3. “If You Live by the Sword, You Will Perish by the Sword”
Instructions, “Put Up Thy Sword”, Did Not Prohibit Sword Possession
Jesus’ “It-is-Enough” Response to Inquiry about Number of Swords
“Live by the Sword-Die by the Sword” Statement Confirms Self-Defense
Jesus Uses Old Testament Term To Reveal Meaning
Jesus’ Instructions Opposed Roman Law
The Unrecorded Response of the Soldiers
Roman Warrior Shows Christian Faith
Roman and Hebrew Self-Defense Philosophy Reconfirmed
Argument 4: “Rejoice in Suffering”
"Rejoice in Suffering” is an Old Testament Doctrine
“Rejoice in Suffering Equals No Self-Defense” Is Illogical
Using People or Scriptures?
A Secular Philosopher’s View

Chapter 4: The Christian’s Response
Necessity
Proportionality
Magnitude of Risk
Context of Probability

Conclusion

Endnotes

Restore the Foundations - "If the foundations be destroyed, what can the righteous do?"

Regulations Against Jews' Possession of Weapons

From Wikipedia:

On November 11, 1938, the Minister of the Interior, Wilhelm Frick, passed Regulations Against Jews' Possession of Weapons. This regulation effectively deprived all Jews of the right to possess firearms or other weapons.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gun_politics_in_Germany#The_193...

try these

1) Innocents Betrayed:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d7vNj2sb_00

2) No Guns for Negroes:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RaX3EM-fsc8

“The welfare of the people in particular has always been the alibi of tyrants.” — Albert Camus

Louis L'Amour?

Well, after slogging through all of those..
why don't you give yourselves a break and consider
North to the Rails - 1971 work of Louis L'Amour?

http://www.amazon.com/North-Rails-Novel-Louis-LAmour/product...

The protagonist (Tom Chantry) is a man born in the West who
loses his father to (gun) violence at a young age. He is
subsequently raised in a comfortable environment in the East, but as
a young businessman goes West again to purchase cattle.

Philosophically against carrying a gun and branded a coward
for backing down from a fight over a trivial matter he finds
this greatly undermines his prospects for the business venture
(which has become critical to the survival of his employer's - and
fiance's father's firm) as no one that can drive his cattle
is willing to work for him.

Anyway, although L'Amour's books are in one sense formulaic,
they all deal with issues of ethics, law, liberty, ecology and
human nature (with lots of history and action thrown in)

This is one of five "Chantry" novels, the earliest chronologically
was "Fair Blows the Wind" set in 17th century Ireland, England and
the Carolinas.

If you're worried you might be blowing your cultural/intellectual
cool well, pick up a copy surreptitiously somewhere. It may not
be for your group, but you're unlikely to want to put it down...

Wish I had discovered LL years ago.