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How would you spend $1000.00 on emergency food and water storage?

If you had $1000.00 to spend on food/water storage what would you buy?

I'm just starting the research and I would love to hear anyone's opinions or ideas.

The smart move looks like buying a IBC Intermediate Bulk Container for water storage and canning/freezing homemade food. Peanut Butter and canned meats are also a good idea for storing food.

Or I could kill two birds with one stone and build an aquaponics system.

What else would you all do?



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Jefferson's picture

Here's

a pretty good thread that was started a while back.
http://www.dailypaul.com/144584/miscellaneous-useful-off-gri...

It has links for cheap water filters like this
http://shop.monolithic.com/products/just-water-ceramic-drip-...

and other good food source info. I got most of my food from the LDS food warehouse in San Antonio. They were very helpful and the prices weren't bad either. There are locations throughout the country.

We stored it in vacuum sealed mylar bags inside black 5 and 6 gallon buckets or canned it right on site with the LDS folks. Even if you never eat it, it's always a good feeling to have something stored back for an emergency..

Buy and Learn

Aquaponics.
You could build one with half of that budget and generate a food supply that would never run out (fish, fruits, and veggies). It can also double as a backup supply of water if needed. The most common mistake made with these systems is not letting it cycle first. This will create food and the excess can be traded away or you could use a HUGE excess to serve as a commodity to back a local currency.
I personally am planning on using one of these systems to feed my family, then in the meantime, get my family to pay me back by starting their own systems. I will use this to generate enough revenue for a HEMP farm! Then I believe I will be able to create generational wealth. Once you have an Aquaponics system, you can invest the rest into silver and gold.
You know the saying "You cannot eat gold" so food is more important.
I hope that helps :)

Ron brought the Liberty movement together, Rand is expanding the crap out of it! :)

Have you checked out Forums?

Over the years DP has had some great threads on this subject.. the Gardening, Science, and Economy all have some darn good information..

Here in CA, where I am, it is suggested we are prepared to suatain for three weeks with no power (and over the years we've had to do this more than once).. what ever you INVEST in, make sure you really really like it. I suggest you buy things you like to eat and eat them while you replace them.. and for me, dry milk, textured vegetable protein, pre packaged meals (you want to eat these before the experation date, which can be 2016 (and can extend)..

Don't forget to have something for a sweet tooth.. when times are bad, sugar tastes good.

Don't forget the 5 C's of survival

As Dave Cantenbury teaches it:

1. Cover
example: http://www.rei.com/product/829634/blizzard-survival-sleeping...

2. Cutting - any good knife will do

3. Combustion - lighters freeze!
example: http://www.amazon.com/Light-Fire-Original-Swedish-FireSteel/...

4. Cordage - such as bank line
example: http://www.amazon.com/Catahoula-Tarred-Twisted-Nylon-Twine/d...

5. Container - a metal bottle that you can boil water in

“The welfare of the people in particular has always been the alibi of tyrants.” — Albert Camus

mobile water solutions

Are you looking to hunker down or be mobile? For mobile solutions, get a filter.

For all situations besides being out on the ocean or chemical contamination, get a hanging bag filter like this one:
http://www.rei.com/product/737349/katadyn-base-camp-water-fi...
Pumps are a pain in the ass. As a back up, get some chlorine dioxide pills.

For the ocean or chemical contamination cases, get a portable solar still, like one of these:
http://www.jonliow.com/Solarball-Water-Purifier
http://www.mailspeedmarine.com/liferaft-accessories/ocean-sa...

“The welfare of the people in particular has always been the alibi of tyrants.” — Albert Camus

You could buy the following for $200

20 jars of peanut butter-$100, equal to 53,000 calories

16x24 packs of bottled water $100, equal to 48 gallons in easily portable containers.

So long as you eat peanut butter, you can have that in your rotation and the stuff has a shelf life of at LEAST a year (embarrassed to say I know that you can eat year old peanut butter after its been opened).

Small capital expenditure up front, you can buy 1 jar and 1 pallet of bottles at a time.

If you have 500 gallons of bad water, you're not any better off than anyone else. Always remember, in a minor emergency, that your water heater has 50 gallons of fresh water in it.

Author of Shades of Thomas Paine, a common sense blog with a Libertarian slant.

http://shadesofthomaspaine.blogexec.com

Also author of Stick it to the Man!

http://www.amazon.com/Stick-Man-Richard-Moyer/dp/1484036417

No.7's picture

Peanut Butter is a great idea

I'm not sold on bottled water for long term use though. The bottles expire and contaminate the water from what I've read.

However John pointed out that an intermediate bulk container has over half the water storage capability for a fifth of the price of the water tank I was looking at.

Don't feel bad about eating old peanut butter lol... I've been there.

The individual who refuses to defend his rights when called by his Government, deserves to be a slave, and must be punished as an enemy of his country and friend to her foe. - Andrew Jackson

what are those water

what are those water tanks...over $600?

Pick up a few IBC's. You can find them on eBay or Craigslist for $100-$150 each. They hold over 300 gallons. You want to make sure they have transported food products like maple syrup...it will say on the container. Then, get a $200 Big Berkey or Pro Pur water filtering system.

With another IBC, you can build an Aquaponic system like here...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WYFM7J_TpTU

Grow fish, fruits and veggies.

Backyard Liberty ( http://www.backyardliberty.com/ ) , sells an info package that shows step by step how to build an Aquaponic system with IBC's...and additional info about growing and maintaining.

I also highly recommend Murray Hallam's excellent DIY Aquaponics...

http://www.theaquaponicstore.com/Murray-Hallam-s-DIY-Aquapon...

He uses IBC's as well.

“Let it not be said that no one cared, that no one objected once it’s realized that our liberties and wealth are in jeopardy.”
― Ron Paul

No.7's picture

You're the man John! Thanks

Good stuff here. I appreciate it.

I had never heard of an intermediate bulk container before this comment. That's a way better idea than buying an expensive tank.

So far I'm liking the aquaponics idea more and more. Thanks for sharing John

The individual who refuses to defend his rights when called by his Government, deserves to be a slave, and must be punished as an enemy of his country and friend to her foe. - Andrew Jackson

Personally

if we're talking long-term, I'd be more concerned about having water filtration systems than actual water. Practically speaking, you can only store so many months worth of water, so I'd rather focus on being able to purify any water that I came across.

Of course, it's always good to have *some* water stored, but as for me, I can do without a 525 gallon tank. Then again, if you live in the southwest, then that changes things...

As far as food goes, again long term. MREs and the like are fine, but putting your money into growing at least some of your own food is even better, though not everyone is in a situation where that's a realistic option.

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No.7's picture

Water filters aren't a bad idea

I live in the southeast but I'm worried that water could get very hard to find in a crisis. I live near several creeks but they often go dry in the summer and there are wells within walking distance but who knows how long the wells will produce? We've had neighbors with well water pay us to fill gallon jugs because the wells quit producing in the summer.

A 525 gallon tank isn't really necessary but as they say "it wouldn't hurt a thing" lol.

As far as farming goes, well, I was born on a farm. My family keeps seeds and a small garden every year but we could definitely do more.

The individual who refuses to defend his rights when called by his Government, deserves to be a slave, and must be punished as an enemy of his country and friend to her foe. - Andrew Jackson

Reply

I'm in the northeast, so that's a big reason why water storage isn't really an issue for me, since I'm surrounded by both fresh and salt water. But yeah, I always make sure to have some filters handy, Brita gets the job done for me, and their products are easy enough to come by.

Sounds like you're ahead of me on the farming end. I've got a ways to go before I can provide a majority of my own food (for now I just buy from local farmers and occasionally hit the grocery store).

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Rice, aquaponic system, water

Rice, aquaponic system, water filters. That is all.

Use the water from the aquaponic system to drink, recycle water back into another stage of the system to filter back into your aquaponics. Eat fish, veggies, rice.

No.7's picture

Ding! I hadn't thought about an aquaponic system

Thank you for sharing. That's a good investment anyways and it could meet some emergency preparedness needs. I'll definitely be researching it and would like to hear anything else you have to say about building an aquaponic system.

The individual who refuses to defend his rights when called by his Government, deserves to be a slave, and must be punished as an enemy of his country and friend to her foe. - Andrew Jackson

As neat as that water tank is, it's not a great use of $500

And a 5000 lb tank would strain any floor and most ground.
For that money you could 20 lifestraws and still take up less room. I'd spend half on storable foods and the other half on a commodity, whether it's silver or tobacco or hershey bars.

No.7's picture

Actually, that's a good point

and the the tank is way overpriced.

The individual who refuses to defend his rights when called by his Government, deserves to be a slave, and must be punished as an enemy of his country and friend to her foe. - Andrew Jackson

If you're planning on freeze-dried food when TSHTF

then you'd better be ingesting it now, too. That stuff is full of MSG and other chemicals (even the ones that say they have no MSG or no MSG added -- the "natural" ones. Gums like carrageenan, guar, etc. are hidden MSG, preservatives, flavorings, it's a big, chemical, toxic plateful). If your body is unaccustomed to it, you will be one hurting puppy in TEOTWAWKI.

Canned meats, etc. are better bets for good digestive health (and overall health). Remember, you can shock your system with rice and beans 24/7, too. And kids will develop food aversions quickly. Stock your shelves with foods you can eat NOW and foods you can rotate. Canned meats are not as good as fresh but the next best thing. Canned, frozen or dehydrated whole, single vegs not as good as fresh, but you get the point. PB&J for kids is good; whole dehydrated foods (vegs, fruit, eggs, etc.) with no flavoring (MSG, chemical-laden) are pretty good.

$1000 will go a lot further thinking all this through then just purchasing buckets of entrees and pre-made meals.

Yeah I learned this the hard way:

Stock your shelves with foods you can eat NOW and foods you can rotate.

Finally our food supply lines up with what my family actually eats, for the most part. We just keep eating it and restocking, so it doesn't go bad, unlike a lot of the barely edible stuff that we had on hand for emergencies before.

Peanut butter, canned beans, canned tomatoes and tomato products, complete protein pasta (Barilla), lots of oils and fats, canned fruits and vegetables. Grains and flours bought in bulk are in the big freezer.

No.7's picture

I doubt I'll buy food online but I wanted to bring it up here

So I could get some comments like this one. I think I could do a lot of food storage at home by canning foods in mason jars putting vac-u-sealed meat in the freezer. I won't be buying rice or bean bags because I live "out in the country" as they say and I know some kind of critter or varmint will eat anything sitting around loose before I will.

I plan on putting most of the money into water storage but I would like to hear more on what you have to say about food storage. You seem to know what you're talking about, thanks for sharing.

The individual who refuses to defend his rights when called by his Government, deserves to be a slave, and must be punished as an enemy of his country and friend to her foe. - Andrew Jackson

Canned hams are cheap and

Canned hams are cheap and store for almost ever. Do the research, all of this stuff is out their. Why you're paying for at those food storage site is packaging and convience.

______
"When the people fear their government, there is tyranny; when the government fears the people, there is liberty."

Thanks...

I'm kind of paranoid, so I study a lot and hoard... ;-)

Anyway, you sort of need to look at it from different perspectives. If you're bugging out, you need one kind of food (lightweight). If you're staying put, then you'll need stuff to get you through until you can grow, catch, kill, etc. your own, or to use after the fresh/frozen stuff is gone.

We have canned meats and vegs on the shelf, as well as Nutriom eggs (awesome). We've canned our own meat/vegs and purchased cases of others. We have chickens (4 eggs/day for my family of 4), and we're growing a pretty big garden this year. We have stores of rice, beans in plastic containers, as well as wheat & corn to grind when needed to make bread. I've put up 8-10 rotating boxes of other stuff the kids like: organic mac&cheese, PB&J, crackers, etc. It's not much, but it's there to fill in when the kids get cranky. We have two full freezers of beef, pork and chicken.(You may need alternative energy to keep them going.)

So, when the freezer meat runs out, then it's on to canned meat and fresh eggs. When we can't get fresh produce, then we'll have canned, frozen and dehydrated (Harmony House has non-GMO, no chemicals at all).

Rabbits are something to consider for protein, but you can't live on them. You'd need to add some kind of fat, though, since they're so lean. Same with deer. That's why I'll always hope to have chickens. Can't beat fresh eggs IMO.

Your ideas to can and vacuum seal are great, as long as you have a way to preserve them off-grid.

So, for me, the answer is to layer in lots of contingency. Good luck!!

No.7's picture

Believe me I know about chickens and rabbits

We've had chickens as long as I can remember. My dad was just telling me last night that building a chicken coop "was a good project for you(me) this weekend". My grandfather used to keep rabbits but I'm not sold on the little devils. They're good at getting loose and ,unlike chickens, the rabbits will run away lol. The only problem with chickens is that they aren't the best animals at staying alive when you let them loose. I've found the eggs taste better when the chickens eat yard bugs instead of feed but a hawk, coyote, or fox will always get a chicken or two if we let them roam for too long.

You make a good point that frozen food will only be good as long as I have power. I don't think meats are the best thing to store though anyways. There will always be squirrells, chickens, rabbits, birds, and other critters to eat if I can't get it at the store. My biggest concern is water

The individual who refuses to defend his rights when called by his Government, deserves to be a slave, and must be punished as an enemy of his country and friend to her foe. - Andrew Jackson

Tell me about it...

We've lost many chickens (mostly to our dog, who likes grass-fed chicken herself...) They're cooped now. It was the only way to ensure we aren't replacing them every couple weeks. Now we have to buy non-GMO corn feed, too.

This seemed...

...like a pretty good seven-part blog on the topic of water:

http://www.efoodsdirect.com/blog/storing-water-part-1-the-fo...

At least, for getting started out, with limited funds.

No.7's picture

Great tips for water storage in there

Thanks for sharing

The individual who refuses to defend his rights when called by his Government, deserves to be a slave, and must be punished as an enemy of his country and friend to her foe. - Andrew Jackson

No offense

but Efoods is full of chemicals. They say all-natural and no 'added' MSG, but it's full of it. I just looked up a product that should have been fairly unadulterated -- the Apple Cinnamon Oatmeal. The cinnamon packet has propylene glycol in it. That's a toxic substance that absorbs liquid. TOXIC SUBSTANCE that you'll be feeding your family during a time of crisis (not that it's good ANY time...)

Anyway, I would stick as close to pure and natural as possible. It's out there and not that expensive. I'd be happy to share links.

No offense...

...taken. I'm sure their food could be improved upon; but I was just focusing on the water info. Anything suspect there?

Please share the links.

Please share the links. Thanks!

Here are a few products that we have

Nutriom OvaEasy eggs www.nutriom.com
Yoder's canned meats (there are other better/cheaper canned meats, though, so research around; Yoder's is not grass-fed, though I'm researching grass-fed replacements right now. Providence Pantry is less fatty and cheaper. There are others out there, too.)
Harmony House dehydrated fruits/vegs www.harmonyhousefoods.com
Red Feather canned butter
Red Feather canned cheese (or Bega - both made in Australia)
Yoder's canned bacon (well, just because)
Yoder's canned flours, sugars, rice

Hope this helps!

That bacon...

...looks pretty awesome for coming out of a can, and the 10+ year shelf life is great. Tempted to try some. Any worries about the sodium nitrite in it?