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Women make better decisions than men

Julia Thomson | Hamilton, Ontario | Posted: March 25, 2013

Women’s abilities to make fair decisions when competing interests are at stake make them better corporate leaders, researchers have found.

A survey of more than 600 board directors showed that women are more likely to consider the rights of others and to take a cooperative approach to decision-making. This approach translates into better performance for their companies.

The study, which was published this week in the International Journal of Business Governance and Ethics, was conducted by Chris Bart, professor of strategic management at the DeGroote School of Business at McMaster University, and Gregory McQueen, a McMaster graduate and senior executive associate dean at A.T. Still University’s School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona.

read more http://www.degroote.mcmaster.ca/articles/women-make-better-d...

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egapele's picture

Huh? Define "better" - better for who?

"women are more likely to consider the rights of others and to take a cooperative approach to decision-making."

Sounds like that's better for someone wanting to live in Hillary's utopic village. No nanny state for me, thanks.

You seem to have missed the part...

"when competing interests are at stake." There are two parts here.

As an individual, I have rights. And so do you! Some people understand that. Others are only willing to acknowledge their own rights and interests. That's the first part. According to the study, (not necessarily all women, but on the whole) women are apparently more likely to consider the rights of others, i.e., not just their own.

Now assuming a situation where there are competing rights or interests - a conflict - there are really only two options. One, the parties can fight, where often "might makes right" - however "might" might be defined, physical advantage or otherwise. Bottom line, this way of operating is at the crux of... war! It also keeps lawyers in business and courts tied up, though it can occur on any scale. In any event, one party wins, the other loses - or sometimes both lose (if both are willing to "fight to the death"). Or there is another option: the parties could attempt to find a "win-win" solution TO their competing rights. Apparently women are more likely than men to take a cooperative approach to decision-making.

"Cooperation" isn't intrinsically some dirty word! When there is no way to voluntarily cooperate without compromising the values closest to one's heart, you do fight - willing to take the consequences. But not everything is a life or death issue. And sometimes, if taking a willingness to see things from both sides and maybe some creative thinking, a mutually-beneficial solution can be found. I can't see why that wouldn't at least be the goal. No less if you're a board director and it's shown to be in the best interest of your company. P.S. You might be interested to check out Steven Covey's "Seven Habits of Highly Effective People." http://marelisa.hubpages.com/hub/7-Habits-of-Highly-Effectiv...

When we try to pick out anything by itself, we find it hitched to everything else in the Universe.
~ John Muir

I was thinking

the same thing. "women are more likely to consider the rights of others and to take a cooperative approach to decision-making. This approach translates into better performance for their companies". To me this statement means the more politically acceptable approach which will definitely provide them with better results in a politicized society as we have right now. Economically, it cannot be better since what's good politics is never good economics.

"Endless money forms the sinews of war." - Cicero, www.freedomshift.blogspot.com