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Patrick Henry, Samuel Adams, and Nathan Hale : Patriots to the End, Faithful to Both the Cause of Liberty and to Their Savior

We have been studying the history of this country, and in particular the events leading up the Revolutionary War and The Declaration of Independence. Part of the assignment from our reading yesterday was a brief summary of Nathan Hale's testimony to Captain Hull. Captain Hull begged him not to go as a spy, arguing: "Your nature is too frank, and open for deceit and disguise! General Washington -nor any commander- has any right to ask you to assume the garment of friendship for the betrayal of others!"

Nathan Hale saw things in a different Light, however. His reply was clear and firm: "I think I owe it to my country to do the thing which seems so important to General Washington, and I know of no other way of getting the desired information than assuming a disguise and passing into the enemy's camp."

His friend, despairing, urged: "But think of the disgrace of it! If you were caught, you would be hung as a criminal! Dear Nathan, I beg of you, Don't Go!"

Nathan Hale responded, gently but firmly: "He (Jesus) took upon Himself the disguise of the men He came to live among, for the good of many and the cause of right. He was arrested and hanged - on a cross! Who am I that I should set up my judgement against His example and General Washington's will?"

His friend made one more attempt, then, realizing he could not stop his friend, kept silent.

Nathan Hale's final confession: "I regret that I have but one life to give for my country."

Samuel Adams, one of the Signers of the Declaration of Independence was equally firm in his faith. He was the 'ringleader' according to some, along with Hancock. He lead a group of Patriots called by some 'Adam's Mohawks' because of their desire to live as simply as possible. He also was responsible for the formation of the Committees of Correspondence, which would later become the Committees of Safety. Sam Adams was also one of the first of the Patriots to argue for natural rights that government could not justly violate.

Shortly after the British Crown appointed its own governor, Governor Gage, a personal message was sent to Samuel Adams. His Directive? Stop your opposition to the Crown, and receive great benefits from personal bribes, (He didn't know Adams very well, evidently. Adams didn't care too much for money) He courageously replied:

"Then you may tell Governor Gage that I trust that I have long since made my peace with the King of Kings (Jesus). No personal consideration shall induce me to abandon the righteous cause of my country: and tell Governor Gage it is the advise of Samuel Adams to him, no longer to insult the feelings of an exasperated people!"

Later, Adams would express concerns with the forming of a strong central government, withholding his signature. "I confess," He wrote to Richard Henry Lee, "as I enter the building, I stumble at the threshold, I meet with a national Government, instead of a Federal Union of States." Though neither Adams nor Hancock signed, they agreed to support the Constitution, as long as some amendments could be added later. These would include the Bill of Rights, which Samuel Adams had worked to see pass.

Patrick Henry, homeschooled by his father, learned to read and was taught the history of the Greeks, Romans and the Reformation. Patrick Henry was greatly influenced by Pastor Samuel Davies, a Presbyterian from Hanover, Pa. Later, his critics would say he spoke like a 'preacher'. Henry had the foresight to see, and logically concluded, as the Stamp Act was passed-

"This is the rise of tyranny."

Patrick Henry was concerned about the rights of individual states, and what could happen if the Articles of Confederation were replaced with a strong central government. His primary concern was that:

"You will never be able to control the size of this government, if you give it that authority. It will become a gargantuan, uncontrollable thing that will feed upon itself."

Concerning slavery, he said: "In a country above all others fond of liberty, many defend a principle as repugnant to humanity as it is inconsistent with the Bible and destructive to liberty." Though he owned slaves, he chose to deal with them as gently as possible, which he saw as the furthest advance he could make toward justice at the time. (Some slaves were treated more like modern 'employees' than slaves in those days)

As to his faith:
"It cannot be emphasized too strongly or too often that this country was founded not by religionists, but by Christians, not on religions, but on the Gospel of Jesus Christ."

In a letter to his daughter, on August 20,1796, he wrote:

"Amongst other strange things said of me, I hear it said by the deists that I am one of their number; and indeed that some good people think that I am no Christian. This thought gives me much more pain than the appellation of Tory; because I think religion of infinitely higher importance than politics; and I find much cause to reproach myself that I have lived so long and given no decided and public proofs of my being a Christian. but indeed my dear child, this is a character I prize far above all this world has or can boast."

May those of us who claim the name of Christian stand for the rights of their citizens as they did!

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I'm in

what a post - thanks for the uplifting lesson
Looking forward to your next

O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave!

Sorry for the lack of response earlier, I am actually reading ..

Ira Stoll's Samuel Adams, A Life, and it has inspired me to bump this.

Did you know:

Samuel Adams wife once received a slave as a gift, and Samuel Adam's response was "A slave cannot live in my house. If she comes, she must be free."

and even Samuel's enemies admitted he could really sing!
"He had a good voice and was a Master of music!"

(I have just read this book, may write a book review on it yet)

"Hence, naturally enough, my symbol for Hell is something like the bureaucracy of a police state or the office of a thoroughly nasty business concern." ~~C.S. Lewis
Love won! Deliverance from Tyranny is on the way! Col. 2:13-15

+ 1

Thank you.

We need the same spirit right now.

LL on Twitter: http://twitter.com/LibertyPoet
sometimes LL can suck & sometimes LL rocks!
http://www.dailypaul.com/203008/south-carolina-battle-of-cow...
Love won! Deliverance from Tyranny is on the way! Col. 2:13-15

MaxK had some interesting words from Ben Franklin that I was

happy to read today: http://www.dailypaul.com/comment/3060231

From reading his diary...an edited version, I would not have ever thought he would have written a letter like that.

Thank you for your post! I am bookmarking to read later as it is getting late here.

Several of the founders were Deists...

There is no use for religious nepotism in a place that prides itself on respect for personal liberty.

A person is not less of a person for being Muslim, Hindu, Buddhist, Atheist, Agnostic, etc. There are good and bad among them all.

Several of the founders were Deists is a meme probably

injected into the government school curriculum at least 50 years ago (I remember hearing it repeated verbatim many times in school). Another good one is "More lives have been lost in religious conflicts than all the wars in history." or something to that effect. Not as easy to remember as "Several of the founders were Deists".

Leges sine moribus vanae

The founders were not deists

This has been proven time and time again to be false, in a study taken of 55 signers, 49 were Protestant. The concept that they were deists has emerged in the last 30 years, and has been proven false more times than i can count.

I have done this so many times it is becoming repetitive, however if you wish to start naming names, i will prove each person you say was a deist actually believed in Christ and the Christian Bible.(which says otherwise)

Indeed, a person is a person...

... regardless of which faith they ascribe to, and I suspect that Libera_me would agree with that. It is Christianity, with its "all of us are made in the image of God" outlook, that provides the strongest basis for affirming that we are all created equal.

A Constitutional, Christian conservative who voted for Ron and stands with Rand

See my answer to mwstroberg, below

My point was not to denigrate any other faith, just to point out that one could be loyal to the Christian faith and still be a patriot. If you would like an article on the Deists, I would be happy to do another piece, or you are free to yourself.

"Hence, naturally enough, my symbol for Hell is something like the bureaucracy of a police state or the office of a thoroughly nasty business concern." ~~C.S. Lewis
Love won! Deliverance from Tyranny is on the way! Col. 2:13-15

I guess I took it the wrong way.

To me it sounded as if you meant this nation was founded solely on the tenets of Christianity, and without a Christian foundation, the country would be "lost in the wilderness" so to speak.

In reality, fundamentalist Christianity has allowed the people at the top lead the people around like a flock of sheep using religious intolerance as a leash.

I understand how you could come to that conclusion

Especially with the closing quote from Patrick Henry. The Founding Fathers would (including Sam Adams and Patrick Henry) have complaints against today's version of "fundamentalist Christianity", where the sins of the 'faithful' are overlooked by them and the sins of the outsider are emphasized. Frankly, Jesus himself had little 'tolerance' (and certainly a contempt for their behavior, as well,) for the self-righteous, while He hung out with the 'publican and the sinners'.

"Hence, naturally enough, my symbol for Hell is something like the bureaucracy of a police state or the office of a thoroughly nasty business concern." ~~C.S. Lewis
Love won! Deliverance from Tyranny is on the way! Col. 2:13-15

While I don't agree that only

"Christians" are fit for political office (how do you determine if someone is truly "Christian" or not? Many use God's name to secure raw political power), I agree that it was the religious and intellectual tolerance and opposition to arbitrary human authority inherent in a true belief in God which formed the basis of America's respect for personal and civil liberties.

Is it possible that God's favor has been removed from this nation, resulting in the fascism spreading across our land? Or is the current political climate simply a test of our mettle in attempting to restore the Golden Rule to the our hearts, a test which we very well might yet pass?

I affirm what you are saying:

One can agree that "do unto others as you would have them do unto you", transcends all law but one, and should be upheld by governments as well as citizens and still be of another faith. (Judaism is the obvious example here, but there are other cultures and faiths that honor this as well) If a person believes this and in keeping their promises ( whether oath or affirmation), I would call them qualified, Christian or not.

As to your two questions, I'm inclined to believe that without some Divine intervention, we are on a fast train to fascism. These to me are not a necessary either/or, but a possible both/and. Often losing a great thing (liberty, or any other thing that is under appreciated) puts it in a whole new light, and reminds us of the value of what we have lost.

"Hence, naturally enough, my symbol for Hell is something like the bureaucracy of a police state or the office of a thoroughly nasty business concern." ~~C.S. Lewis
Love won! Deliverance from Tyranny is on the way! Col. 2:13-15

mwstroberg, I don't think that Libera_me is advocating...

... that "only Christians are fit for political office." Is there something in her post that makes you think that she is so advocating?

Regarding your second paragraph, I certainly would link the increasing secularism within our contry's societal elite over the last century with the erosion of respect for inalienable rights over that same period of time. It seems to me that once the concept of God-given rights is replaced with state-given rights, it is only a matter of time before the almighty state begins to revoke those rights if and when they become inconvenient.

A Constitutional, Christian conservative who voted for Ron and stands with Rand

Andrew,

I wasn't actually claiming that Libera_me thought only Christians were fit for political office. My statement "While I don't agree.." was meant as a preemptive warning to all of those who call themselves "Christians" and also believe they have some divine power to determine who is truly Christian or not that "I don't agree" with them. I get a little tired of the religious wars on the DP, with each side (all sides, we can't leave out those oh so objective and reasonable "agnostics") claiming the other side has nothing of merit to say.

I believe that Christians (and atheists), by THEIR OWN STATED STANDARDS, endorse humility and should act accordingly. This is coming from someone who learned about liberty from an atheist's perspective, who feared and distrusted Christians, but who later came to believe in God and saw that liberty was every bit as valuable to a believer as it was to an atheist.

Because I had been an atheist who was as arrogant and obnoxious as any of the "cram it down your throat" atheists and Christians on this site, I determined, once I had decided that Jesus was the Son of God, to NEVER approach my Christian beliefs in the way I had approached my atheist beliefs.

There are literally people on the DP who think that ONLY Christians are fit for political office, as well as some on the DP who think that ONLY atheists are fit for political office. And there are subgroups of these groups who think that their beliefs should be codified in law. If you don't believe me try searching, you'll find the posts.

Ok, mwstroberg...

... fair enough.

A Constitutional, Christian conservative who voted for Ron and stands with Rand

Thank you, Libera_me, for this informative bit of history!

Would you agree with me, lady patriot, that the Christian faith serves as the foundation for a proper understanding of inalienable rights?

P.S.: I have posted a response to your post in the Agape' Forum. God bless, sister patriot.

A Constitutional, Christian conservative who voted for Ron and stands with Rand

Yes, however Judaism (Biblical)

is the foundation for Christianity...

"Hence, naturally enough, my symbol for Hell is something like the bureaucracy of a police state or the office of a thoroughly nasty business concern." ~~C.S. Lewis
Love won! Deliverance from Tyranny is on the way! Col. 2:13-15

You are correct, Libera_me!

If you don't mind me asking, lady patiot, are you a Jewish Christian? Thank you and God bless.

A Constitutional, Christian conservative who voted for Ron and stands with Rand

No, not that I know of...

But my parents raised me to respect the Older Testament and the 'people of the book. Scriptural research lead me to believe that though the Lutheran and Reformed branches of Christianity have much to commend them, the leaders often missed the impact of Romans 11.

"Hence, naturally enough, my symbol for Hell is something like the bureaucracy of a police state or the office of a thoroughly nasty business concern." ~~C.S. Lewis
Love won! Deliverance from Tyranny is on the way! Col. 2:13-15

Well said, (((Libera_me)))

I disagree with those Christians who deny that God will, in the last days, pour out his Spirit upon the Jews and draw them to Christ. I also disagree with those Christians who focus exclusively upon God restoring Jews to the land of Israel, and ignore the need for God to restore them spiritually -- that is, to faith in Messiah.

Dear sister, I have, concerning my Sexuality: Divine and Human multi-post, written a response to your comment at the end of Part 2. I look forward to, and will attempt to respond to, any observations or questions that you may have after finishing the series. God bless, sister patriot.

A Constitutional, Christian conservative who voted for Ron and stands with Rand