10 votes

The Mob Wants More Money

Recently my small community voted to pass legislation that will raise property taxes to help fund the local high school.

The mantra was that other school districts in the area cost more and if the measure wasn't passed and the school is forced to consolidate, citizens would end up being charged a higher tax rate than what they would with the property tax increases.

Most of the sheep bought right in and believed that it was their duty to participate in this fraud disguising itself as a real choice. Most area (stated republicans) paraded on their facebook account how it was the only logical choice to raise taxes to avoid higher taxes.

Little do they know that they have become the exact same as the senators and house members we loathe for their inability to find a real solution and just raise taxes in order to "avoid disaster".

I chose to be quiet, realizing that most people would not understand my view not to participate in the raising of taxes.....but then today an opportunity presented itself.

One of my friends on Facebook posted a poll the local paper had on it's site. The question was whether or not a home schooled child should be able to participate in public school sports. In order to preserve the debate, I will post the discussion that followed

Friend: What is the difference between Public Athletics and Public Schools? Dont get me wrong, i am not against home schooling. But why is the athletic program ok and the class room not?

Mystery man: Yes.... their parents likely pay property taxes

Superintendent of School: Most coaches pay and cost of those programs don't come from property tax funds. They come from the state and you don't get any money for students who don't come to your school. I believe students shouldn't be able to pick ad choose. I can see a lot of issues popping up from this. Again, nothing against home schooling. I think there are ways that they can still compete and participate in athletics. Just don't see why the school they chose not to go to should have to supply them with extra curricular opportunities.

Me: Whether or not the parents property taxes go directly to the sports program, I feel, is irrelevant. If someone is, by force, made to pay taxes, and all state money is derived from some form of forced participation from the tax payer, the least they could do is allow the constituents to pick and choose what state controlled programs they participate in. A parent may not feel that they want their kid in a classroom all day, but may feel good about the athletic program. I understand it probably isn't that cut and dry, but in a society where illegal immigrants get welfare benefits, I could overlook something as little as this.

Mystery Man 2: The school not good enough for students the athletic programs not good enough either just saying

Me:So lets say you pay me to throw a barbecue party, and I buy quality steaks and fry them up, as well as make some potato salad. Your wife makes some great fries and you want to bring them to the party as a side instead of the potato salad. Then I say if you don't eat your potato salad you can't have any of the steak. Doesn't make any sense to me.

Superintendent: I am just saying from my perspective that those students who do not come to school cost that school dollars. Property tax arguments went out the window 6 years ago. I just don't like this sense of entitlement we give everyone. I just don't look forward to a student who doesn't have to meet the same requirements academically that a normally schooled child has to plays over someone who actually helps keep that school open by providing the revenue to drive that corporation and keep it solvent. I just think it opens up Pandora's box. Why can't those students still play athletics at the YMCA or at donut hill or better yet put together a homeschool league or team.

Me: But the kid isn't keeping the school open. The kid attending brings more tax money allocated to that school but the kid is actually costing the state money. His/her attendance isn't generating more money for the state or nation, they are actually the ones that are being taught to be entitled (in my view) because they are getting something by burdening others to pay for them. It shouldn't be the punishment of the home schooler that the state and nation set schools up to be rewarded for the amount of students it has in it. The homeschoolers should be afforded the same opportunity. I understand it may be tough and academic standards would probably need to be changed to make things doable. ****, you have way more insight in these matters though, would love to sit down for lunch sometime to learn how it all really works (I'm probably looking through a hazy lens). Anyway I'll stop hijacking the conversation and let others discuss.

There you have it. I have now jumped into the thick of it. Oh, by the way, I'm a paid coach at this school :) Would love some feedback on some more ideas or thoughts.




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As a homeschooler

this statement really bothers me...

"I just don't like this sense of entitlement we give everyone."

Who exactly is entitled? Home school families? I would argue that I'm just trying to get a little something out of my money. I own a home, I pay school taxes, my children should at least be able to play sports.

"I just don't look forward to a student who doesn't have to meet the same requirements academically that a normally schooled child has to plays over someone who actually helps keep that school open by providing the revenue to drive that corporation and keep it solvent."

1. I'm pretty sure most home school children could could maintain a C average, those are the academic requirements a "normally schooled child" has to meet in our school district.

2. Furthermore, the home schooled child would be providing revenue for the activity through booster clubs, fundraisers, camps, clinics, and our local schools charge extra to participate in sports.
Earlier he stated: "Most coaches pay and cost of those programs don't come from property tax funds. They come from the state and you don't get any money for students who don't come to your school."

So, where does this money from the state come from? Taxes, and I pay those taxes too.

3. Since when are public schools corporations?

4. This "educator" needs to learn how to form a coherent sentence.

"Why can't those students still play athletics at the YMCA or at donut hill or better yet put together a homeschool league or team."

Why do homeowners who don't use public schools have to pay school taxes? He doesn't want to answer that question, according to him that argument "went out the window 6 years ago".

My thoughts exactly. Thanks

My thoughts exactly. Thanks for the support.

Homeschooled kids should be allowed to play on sports teams...

if they're any good. If they suck they should be cut from the team or at least subjected to public humiliation of some form...

It is what it is and it ain't what it ain't. Also there's pandas.

"Anyone who thinks you can't create something out of nothing never dated a drama queen."

-me

Good news.

After runaway school board spending in Indiana, a few years ago they passed the property tax cap: 1% residential, 2% comm and farmland, 3% industrial. Now these school systems are forced to live off a per student allotment.

Thanks. Does this apply to

Thanks. Does this apply to all levels of government total, or can local governments add tax on top of that cap?

This applies to your entire property tax bill.

There is still a county income tax option which varies greatly. The state gets theirs from sales, excise and income taxes.

The property tax cap curtailed spending by forcing cities, counties, libraries, hospitals and school boards to compete for the capped tax.

Interesting story in my area (SW Indiana), the smallest public school system in the state, built a school addition about 10 to 15 years ago. At the same time a slightly larger private school addition was built about 7 miles away for less than half the cost per square foot. This is due to the inefficient public school requirements forced by the state.