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One-third of honeybee colonies in US died last winter: The food collapse approaches

(NaturalNews) The Bee Informed Partnership (BIP) recently published preliminary data from its annual review of bee colony declines in the U.S., and the findings from this report are mind-boggling. According to the latest survey results, an astounding 31.3 percent, or roughly one-third, of all managed bee colonies in the U.S. were wiped out during the most recent 2012/2013 winter season, a rate that represents a 42 percent increase compared to the number of colonies lost during the previous 2011/2012 winter season.

According to BIP, which works in collaboration with both the Apiary Inspectors of America (AIA) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), U.S. beekeepers on average lost more than 45 percent of their colonies during the 2012/2013 winter season, a 78.2 percent jump in losses over the previous season. And overall, more than 70 percent of respondents, most of whom were backyard beekeepers, experienced losses beyond the 15 percent "acceptable" threshold, illustrating a monumental problem not only for bee survival but also for the American food supply.

Continue:
http://www.naturalnews.com/040347_honeybees_Colony_Collapse_...



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ChristianAnarchist's picture

I hear this almost every

I hear this almost every year. How can it be that this year we have lost 1/3 of bee colonies and the year before last we lost 1/3 and a couple of years before that we lost 1/3 and who knows how many other years it's been "reported" that we lost "x" amount of our bee colonies... Seems like we manage to get through somehow. I'm quite tired of hearing all these accounts "doomsday" hype that never come to pass. Somehow I think this big blue ball will keep on keeping on no matter what we do. I've heard the same stories since the 60's with just a tiny bit of difference in the details. Let's all stop trying to scare each other, ok??

Beware the cult of "government"...

And I am tired of stupid

And I am tired of stupid ignorant post like yours... Maybe if you looked at the evidence and the research on this you might not be so inclined to make idiotic remarks and false arguments, I won't hold my breath... Sigh!

Yeah lets all just stick our heads in the sand make stupid comments never having researched the problem and everything will be fine... The Mayans thought everything was just peachy till they ran out of resources... Fucking morons... Bigger sigh!

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Monsanto.

Monsanto.

I bookmarked this--

beehives are not allowed in some towns--

in many actually--

there are bees from the deep south (as in Africa/South America) that are, because of warming temperatures, moving north--

the solution to this is:

stop using 'agricultural' chemicals of any kind

make habitats for mason bees

I like honey and support a local raw honey producer most of whose honey comes from this area--

but it's important to make life happy for mason bees and other insects that pollinate--

while doing everything possible to keep honeybees going--

it's hard to be awake; it's easier to dream--

How Much Space Needed

I live in a house in a suburb. I have a fairly large backyard, about 1/2 an acre. Is this enough space to have a beehive without my neighbors being bothered? Do bees do well in the suburbs?

tasmlab's picture

Would they get to crops?

I'm no farmer/biologist/entomologist, but if your suburban home isn't near a farm, and particularly one of the farms that has a bee shortage, you may just be starting a bee keeping hobby, which is dandy, but it may not stave off the global food supply chain crisis.

Currently consuming: Gatto: "Underground history of education..", FDR; Wii U; NEP Football

That's plenty of space you

That's plenty of space you could have several hives. Neighbors will not even know you have bees. Bees don't bother people they are all about their work and contrary to popular belief honey bees are not aggressive.

I'd rather see 2000 people with one hive then one commercial grower with two thousand hives that loses half of them because of commercial practices.

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Thanks for the reply

Appreciate you taking time to answer.

I though it would be enough space. There is a local beekeepers association in my county and I may attend their next meeting. It appears they even assign mentors to help you learn how to keep bees.

I have two 4x8 raised bed gardens and will be adding two more next year for a total of 128 total square feet of garden. In addition to hopefully helping the bees, they'll help pollinate my veggies. Plus, we have about 6 mulberry trees, raspberry bush and I'll be adding 6 - 10 blackberry bushes so hopefully they'll be happy here and survive.

I am a natural bee keeper,

I am a natural bee keeper, Bee clubs tend to promote commercial practices even for hobby bee keepers. You might find some natural bee keepers in the bee club but its a crap shoot.

Here is a site I recommend. A mentor would be nice if they use natural practices. However if they teach conventional practices I do not recommend it. They will tell you you need to be checking and messing with you bees weekly for mites and disease etc. and to use unnatural plastic foundation that is the wrong size for bee cells (don't do it), and spraying your bees with "insecticide" to kill mites. Hello bees are insects too... When it is these practices and more that make the bees susceptible to those things.

I use Warre hives instead of conventional Langstroth or National type hives and will be trying what is called a Perone Super hive this year.

With youtube and the internet you can learn everything you need to know online. Natural beekeeping is much easier then conventional and low maintenance once you get your colony/s established which doesn't take long. Let the friggen bees do what they have done for millions of years. Gee how did they ever survive without man? In fact Man thinking he knows better then the bees is what is causing their decline.

here is a forum for natural beekeeping I recommend:

http://www.biobees.com/forum/index.php

We want to save the bees not perpetuate practices that are causing their decline.

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Thanks again

I will be pursuing natural beekeeping as I do with my all natural veggy garden.

"Let the friggen bees do what they have done for millions of years. Gee how did they ever survive without man?" - Amen to that brother

Thanks again for the advice and I'll check out the website and educate myself via YouTube like I did for my gardents.

Winter is always hard on bees

in the northern latitudes. We usually have to buy new bees every spring. And there are always new bees to buy. We have three colonies, one old and two new, in our garden as I type.

other studies are

showing that most of these managed bee population die offs are related to commercial bee keepers feeding high-fructose corn syrup to their bee populations. We know it's poison I have no idea why American's continue to consume it. Since high-fructose corn syrup has become the normal sweetener for most of these corporations type 2 diabetes has skyrocketed. That's enough evidence for me to steer clear of it.

The bold effort the present bank had made to control the government ... are but premonitions of the fate that await the American people should they be deluded into a perpetuation of this institution or the establishment of another like it-Andrew Jackson

I look at my garden and fruit trees

and I see all kinds of insects doing the job of pollinating. Although the die off of so many bee colonies is disturbing I wonder if the impact of fewer bees is as terrible as they make it sound. Or is it just detrimental to the big growers?

There are lots of pollinators

There are lots of pollinators besides the European Honeybee. (How do you think the American plants, including the Indians' crops, got pollinated before Columbus?) There are lots of pollinators besides bees of all sorts. There are even pollinators besides insects in general. And then there's wind. (Growing tomatoes and peppers indoors? Shake them occasionally when they're in bloom.)

We established a local population of blue orchard bees. But we immediately had part of our next boxes populated by leafcutter bees (another solitary bee) and have three other resident species of bees (not counting the wild honeybees), several other pollinating insects, and hummingbirds as frequent fliers in our tiny urban garden.

The honeybee was just convenient for commercial farming because it lives in hives with enormous populations, the hives can be made portable to "bee-bomb" a big field or orchard during its plant-sex season, and it produces additional products like honey and beeswax.

Big monoculture fields might not be pollinated quite as efficiently without them. But we're not facing a "no crops, people starve, cultivated plants go extinct" scenario by a long shot, even if the honeybees ALL die out.

= = = =
"Obama’s Economists: ‘Stimulus’ Has Cost $278,000 per Job."

That means: For each job "created or saved" about five were destroyed.

We are in Danger

"Big monoculture fields might not be pollinated quite as efficiently without them. But we're not facing a "no crops, people starve, cultivated plants go extinct" scenario by a long shot, even if the honeybees ALL die out."

Yes we are. The majority of food sold today is raised on these mono crop farms. If honeybees die out we will have famines and be reduced to to grains mostly that are wind pollinated.

The way we farm is unsustainable and most of the crops we farm were not here when this land relied on it's natural pollinators.

Still most of the fruits and vegetable we eat rely on honey bees for the most part. What a mundane existence if the majority of food were reduced to cornmeal and oatmeal that wind pollinatee and are largely GMO now.

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70 pounds lost and counting! Get in shape for the revolution!

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Thanks for the answer

But I have a question about what you said/asked. Perhaps I'm not clear on the subject.

"There are lots of pollinators besides the European Honeybee. (How do you think the American plants, including the Indians' crops, got pollinated before Columbus?)"

Are you saying that only European bees are affected and/or that the Americas don't have indigenous honey bees?

Thanks again.

I have a fear of bees, wasps, etc.

but this info kinda makes me want to take up bee keeping (or make one of my kids do it!) to help support our plans to start a Community Supported Ag farm.

Yikes! Scary stuff...

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Wasps are not out to get you either.

They only dive bomb when you get real close to their nest, otherwise they will move away when you come near.

honey bees are generally not

Honey bees are generally not aggressive and it takes a lot to stir them up more then most people think. If they have some africanized genes they can be more aggressive but they only survive in the south side of the US. If you are anywhere where you have four seasons no worries. But even the the Africanized bee stories are over blown.

Give it a go my bees are like pets I love them and hate to see even one of them die. I got a colony last June out of a tree that has 6 combs drawn I accidently knocked some of their comb down trying to get the branch and not one tried to sting me. They were agitated but still none tried to attack.

I have got several calls this year for swarms and picked up one for some folks I made a hive for.

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End The Fat
70 pounds lost and counting! Get in shape for the revolution!

Get Prepared!

Meep!

I wonder what can be done to reverse that trend, at least for local farms and such. I'd hate to think that the pesticide problem is so widespread that a community can't buy a large plot of land, grow a bunch of flowers and fruit and vegetables in it organically, and plop a beehive smack in the middle of it.

"Moderation in temper is always a virtue; but moderation in principle is always a vice." -- Thomas Paine