1 vote

State Officials KNEW the bridge had been hit January 2013

http://xfinity.comcast.net/articles/news-general/20130524/US...

Officials performed a special inspection six months ago of the bridge that collapsed because there were indications it had been struck by a different vehicle.
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A report released Friday says the checkup was done due to "impact damage," and inspectors identified tears, deformations and gouges on the northbound side of the bridge. The report also summarizes a variety of parts on the bridge that have been subjected to "high-load" hits.
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In that Nov. 29, 2012, impact, an overheight truck struck a metal overhead truss on the bridge, DOT spokeswoman Broch Bender said. An inspection crew "thoroughly investigated and determined the bridge to be safe," with only minor repairs required. She said those minor repairs were added to an existing list of bridge maintenance items to be completed at a future date.

Ed Scherbinski, vice president of Mullen Trucking, said in an interview with The Associated Press that state officials had approved of the company's plan to drive the oversize load along I-5 to Vancouver, Wash., and the company hired a local escort to help navigate the route.

Mike Allende, a state Department of Transportation spokesman, confirmed the truck had a permit.

"We're still trying to figure out why it hit the bridge," Allende said. "It's ultimately up to the trucking company to figure out whether it can get through."

State officials approved the trucking company to carry a load as high as 15 feet, 9 inches, according to the permit released by the state. However, the southbound vertical clearance on the Skagit River bridge is as little as 14 feet, 5 inches, state records show. That lowest clearance is outside of the bridge's vehicle traveling lanes, Transportation Department communications director Lars Erickson said Friday. The bridge's curved overhead girders are higher in the center of the bridge but sweep lower toward a driver's right side.

The bridge has a maximum clearance of about 17 feet, but there is no signage to indicate how to safely navigate the bridge with a tall load.

The permit specifically describes the route the truck would take, though it includes a qualification that the state "Does Not Guarantee Height Clearance."

It's not rare for trucks to strike bridges in Washington state — it's just that such accidents don't usually cause the structures to collapse.

The state DOT said there were 21 bridge-strikes involving trucks last year, 24 in 2011 and 14 in 2010.

Officials performed a special inspection six months ago of the bridge that collapsed because there were indications it had been struck by a different vehicle.

A report released Friday says the checkup was done due to "impact damage," and inspectors identified tears, deformations and gouges on the northbound side of the bridge. The report also summarizes a variety of parts on the bridge that have been subjected to "high-load" hits.

In that Nov. 29, 2012, impact, an overheight truck struck a metal overhead truss on the bridge, DOT spokeswoman Broch Bender said. An inspection crew "thoroughly investigated and determined the bridge to be safe," with only minor repairs required. She said those minor repairs were added to an existing list of bridge maintenance items to be completed at a future date.

There are no signs leading up to the Skagit River bridge to warn about its clearance height. State Transportation Secretary Lynn Peterson said that under federal and state standards, the clearance is tall enough to not require signage.

Inslee said it will cost $15 million to repair the bridge. The federal government has already promised the state $1 million in emergency funding.

A Federal Highway Administration database lists the bridge that collapsed as "functionally obsolete" — a category meaning that the design is outdated, such as having narrow shoulders and low clearance underneath. But it was not classified as structurally deficient.

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MORE ON SANTIAGO Chile is

MORE ON SANTIAGO

Chile is almost an anarchist paradise. Here is just one example.

I was walking along with Ken Carpenter, a Freedom Consultant at Galt's Gulch Chile and the concierge of Santiago's TDV Group. I saw some firefighters (bomberos) soliciting for money on the street. I looked at Ken, confused.

"Why are they asking for money?" I asked him.

"Oh, you didn't know? All the firefighters in Chile are volunteers," he said.

And, that is the case!

He went on, "Haven't you ever noticed some taxi drivers have their volunteer firefighter ID on their dash?" he asked.

I hadn't notice but will certainly take notice in the future!

He went on to tell me that often a taxi driver will be driving around when a fire call comes in and he will go there immediately if it is in his vicinity and help put out the fire.

Now that is true anarchy in action!

Earlier this week, Gary Gibson had a stellar article ("How Private Policing Trumps Government Law Enforcement") on how some of the policing in Detroit has become privatized and how much better it is now. Of course, in Detroit it has become necessity due to TEOTMSAWKI whereas in Chile it is likely much more of a feeling of community and caring for it.

But, in either case, we are working towards a world where people are realizing that private solutions are always preferable to collective, theft/violence based solutions. I mean, c'mon, it's not 1384 anymore... get with the program people.

The biggest arguments people who still believe in the old violent/theft-based way of doing things always have are...

1. Police - look at Detroit and see Gary's article

2. Firefighters - look to Chile

3. The roads

Oh, the roads. Just hearing that word now grates my ears like the phrase, "donut shop closed" hurts the ears of Snooki.

If we've now got the police and firefighters part figured out, is "the roads" the only reason left that statists believe in 50% taxation and living in a police state?

Then, as I was writing this, a bridge collapsed in Washington State. It was like a illustrative gift from the gods! Now, of course, for whoever plunged into the icy waters, it must have been terrible... but I hear everyone is okay.

But, for those of us who constantly try to point out the fallacy of the state it was just another one of those shoulder-the-guy-next-to-you-in-the-ribs-and-give-a-little-wink moments.

It turns out that an oversized truck had caused the collapse... but nevertheless, a Federal Highway Administration study shows 11% of all bridges in the US are structurally deficient! And, how do you think they got that way? Well, when things are collectivized there is neither profit motive to upkeep things and a definite bureaucratic motive to siphon off as much money as possible to the bureaucrats with little to no chance of anyone, ever getting fired.

In Chile, most highways are all privatized toll roads and they are glorious. This is the road between Santiago and Vina del Mar in which Galt's Gulch is almost right in the center just off this road.

It's one of the most perfectly upkept roads I've ever been on. They even have on-call medical/ambulance staff along the route in case of emergencies... all part of their private-enterprise service.

Isn't it time we stopped saying that we need government for "roads"?