6 votes

Car Hacking ("Boston Brakes")

I saw this mentioned in than EPJ article about Michael Hastings (http://www.economicpolicyjournal.com/2013/06/fbi-we-were-not...). At the end of the article, however, is a mention of "Boston Brakes" and the suggestion that it's one possible explanation of Hastings' crash.

http://news.cnet.com/8301-27080_3-20005047-245.html



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Don't even need the laptop in the controlled car

Its a small module, usually plugged into a diagnostic interface. The diagnostic tool has a short range, but it's wouldn't be hard to hide it and boost its signal.

The tool can change engine rpm's, isolate and turn off one or more cylinders, apply the breaks, or pretty much anything else the car can do electronically. The right software could disable the internals controls too.

Just open the box and see

I don't trust the drive by

I don't trust the drive by wire systems in cars. Maybe those Toyota out of control acceleration crashes were hacked system tests.

All I know definitively right now is, no one should buy another Mercedes Benz till they get their fiery explosive crash situation under control and explain the crash that killed Michael Hastings in such a violent way in that vehicle.

So you don't suspect foul play?

I was thinking it seemed pretty likely that there was foul play. But maybe I'm being too quick to think that way?

Let's say the Mafia was being

Let's say the Mafia was being investigated and the investigator met a sudden, violent death. Would you think it would be unreasonably hasty to assume there was foul play?

When anticipating how Corporate Government bodies might react to the threat of uncomfortable exposure, ask yourself: What would the Mafia do?