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Low Tech: 3 Ways to Beat the NSA

...the all-seeing eye in Washington has a blind spot. As technology has funneled nearly all communications through vulnerable, searchable, database-ready channels, government spies seem to feel confident that any and all communications contrary to the interests of the state will pass through their omniscient electronic dragnet. However, as thorough and brilliant the NSA spymasters might be in tracking every bit and byte, the multi-billion dollar systems can be easily defeated by even a mildly determined private citizen.

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http://shadesofthomaspaine.blogexec.com/index.php/entry/low-...




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Keywords

We should probably just add all the NSA's favorite keywords to every call and missive, and make the sytem useless until they pull the plug. Background noise is how you drown out eavesdropping.

I'm not planning to be the target of an investigation of any kind, but I am a screenwriter, and I can imagine it! When they're looking at you, you need a different strategy, and it's harder to hide.

Meanwhile, I can easily imagine that a couple of army buddies have become established in civilian life, one as a Deputy District Attorney and one a contractor with the NSA. They have a barbeque, and talk about their careers. How easy would it be for the NSA contractor to slip information to the prosecutor, like a friend being helpful?

And, of course, the IRS pays bounties for such info so there's an incentive.

Pretty soon, it's "I know a guy who might be able to help" and it's all over. The leaker can't stop, can he? Besides, it makes him feel so helpful, stopping crime and violating the Constitution.

What do you think? http://consequeries.com/

meekandmild's picture

Something else I notice

when ever you use a debit or credit card you get all kinds of junk mail in postal and email. on months I use cash only. I hardly get any junk mail.

Using cash is low tech and you never have to worry about going over your limit and all the extra bank fees that come along with it.

This may be useful...

http://www.dailypaul.com/269439/how-to-tell-who-is-selling-y...

Potential Annualized National Debt Allowance - a look back at 40 years of PANDA diplomacy next Pandaline

Ultimately,

Junk mail is free fuel.

Author of Shades of Thomas Paine, a common sense blog with a Libertarian slant.

http://shadesofthomaspaine.blogexec.com

Also author of Stick it to the Man!

http://www.amazon.com/Stick-Man-Richard-Moyer/dp/1484036417

Bump for low-tech.

:)

Potential Annualized National Debt Allowance - a look back at 40 years of PANDA diplomacy next Pandaline

Bump for low tech and high

Bump for low tech and high techs love child

Anyone else see this and

Anyone else see this and think it must be a secret code showing that the artist thinks Bacon is really responsible for Shakespeare's works?

It is a drawing showing how to decipher secret codes, while the 'secret' code is plain to see: Shakespeare is visible and what most people will see (i.e. gets all the credit) but Bacon is the roots (which stabilize and nourish Shakespeare).

What better way to have a playful joke on people looking at a diagram showing varieties of codes than to hide a secret message in plain sight?

Sometimes it is good to take a break from the news and real conspiracies and spend some time thinking about a fun one like this.

One video, of many, about the possible Shakespeare conspiracy:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NZsy66w5RZ4

Maybe not another code, but rather an applied meaning.

I'm speculating a bit, but perhaps it's just showing a hierarchy of the different modes of burring information secretively in front of an audience. Bacon's on the bottom because he used mathematically encryption, something very grounded and fundamental, like roots. The others seem to be scholars and poets and play writes of different sorts. They're probably being viewed as hiding their messages in verse as secondary meanings. So, their names are next to secondary structure of the plant, the leaves. Shakespeare as the flower? He still hid meaning in verse, but perhaps he's at the top because he hid meaning within already hidden messages, sort of double message encryption. It wasn't exactly the height of free speech, hiding esoteric message under the veil of exoteric messages might have had great utility if it let his writings propagate unbeknownst to people that would otherwise restrict his message. I always found it odd how much elegance was mixed in with vulgar humor in Shakespeare, but obviously he was speaking to different audience at the same time. Perhaps, the same applies to hidden meanings.

Sounds like a Hollywood film

Plot: Shakespeare's plays were actually a way of sending coded messages. He was actually a spy and not really a playwright.

Insert a series of events, find some bad actors (is Nicolas Cage available?) and you've got a great movie that will go straight to video.

________________________________________

Lovely.

Hiding something in plain sight was the central point of the article.

All the encryption in the world can ultimately be defeated, but steganography, or the art of hiding a message's very existence, is ultimately technology-proof.

Author of Shades of Thomas Paine, a common sense blog with a Libertarian slant.

http://shadesofthomaspaine.blogexec.com

Also author of Stick it to the Man!

http://www.amazon.com/Stick-Man-Richard-Moyer/dp/1484036417

Actually... I decided to

Actually... I decided to search for Riverbanks Laboratories, mentioned as the place where the artist that drew this diagram worked, and it turns out it was the forerunner of the NSA, if you believe this video about it:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uA_hLDT9giE

I can't watch the whole thing, the music creeps me out, but it seems they originally were proponents of the Bacon is Shakespeare theory, then later disproved it.

They also tried to build acoustic levitation machines according to the video.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Riverbank_Laboratories

Wikipedia says it was built by George Fabyon for 'his desire to decode and decipher enemy messages, and also the works of Shakespeare.' Clearly the Wikipedia entry is not entirely accurate, though, since the above drawing is dated 1916 and Wikipedia says it was founded in 1918.

http://www.geneva.il.us/riverbnk/riverpag.htm - "Riverbank can be considered to be a direct lineal predecessor of the National Security Agency and Central Intelligence Agency."

That is from the city website where it is located.

Hmmm

That's convenient then to publish such a picture. As in, please use encryption we all ready know how to crack for your secret messages.

No J?

I would have cut out Z and used an S instead of leaving out J or use 6 place holders and then you could fit numbers 0-9 as well. But, even 5 place holders seems excessive. Maybe use something with three possibilities so that you'd only need three of them to express 27 characters.

In Latin and German, and I

In Latin and German, and I suspect in English until some point, "I" and "J" were basically the same letter (both come from Phoenician "yod")- likewise "U" and "V" come from Phoenician "waw." Perhaps that could explain the lack of "J" and "U."

According to this Wikipedia article "The first English-language book to make a clear distinction between 'i' and 'j' was published in 1633" seven years after Sir Bacon died.

Andrew Napolitano for President 2016!
http://andrewnapolitano.com/index

"Patriotism should come from loving thy neighbor, not from worshiping Graven images." - ironman77

That's very perceptive.

Now that you mention it, I remember that from Indiana Jones and the last crusade, when he goes to step on the J. Which doesn't make much sense if the character wasn't made before the temple. Thanks for the bit of trivia. I thought I had read some old English before, but I may have to reexamine that claim. :)

The "J" character (logo)

The "J" character (logo) existed as far back as Latin, but the unique sound it makes today is recent. It actually started as a stylized way to write "I" when it was used as a consonantal "y" sound, and still makes that sound in many other languages. That's why English has retained the name "Jehovah" for God, that would have been pronounced "Yehowah" in the past.

Also, most people don't realize that "Old English" is dated before 1066. I can't tell you how many times I've heard the KJV or Shakespear referred to as "Old" English. 'Tis archaic, but not "Old."

Andrew Napolitano for President 2016!
http://andrewnapolitano.com/index

"Patriotism should come from loving thy neighbor, not from worshiping Graven images." - ironman77

Damn,

Shakespeare is exactly what I was referring to. So you can lump me in that category too. I just figured that was about as far back as I could go and still get something tangible out of the original texts. Prior to that I don't even recognize their cursive/type faces. I wouldn't be able to even decipher the characters used in Beowulf. Hence, I thought that it was safe to think that Shakespeare constitutes "Old English". Hahahaha.

Are you a literary scholar of some sort?

I'd like to be

I'd like to be (Linguistics is my dilettante obsession), but if I were more learned, I could probably cite something more specific than Wikipedia.

the "Old English" problem is just like the "Libertarian" verses "libertarian" problem. Shakespeare's writings are English, and they are old, but "Old English" is a jargon term linguists use to define a period of time in the English Language.

Old English is before 1066, Middle English is 1066-1511, and Modern English is after 1511, if i remember right.

Andrew Napolitano for President 2016!
http://andrewnapolitano.com/index

"Patriotism should come from loving thy neighbor, not from worshiping Graven images." - ironman77

Contrast this comment section

with most. Talk about a learned audience. Wow guys.

Author of Shades of Thomas Paine, a common sense blog with a Libertarian slant.

http://shadesofthomaspaine.blogexec.com

Also author of Stick it to the Man!

http://www.amazon.com/Stick-Man-Richard-Moyer/dp/1484036417

I'm afraid you'll have to

I'm afraid you'll have to take that up with Sir Francis Bacon. I agree it could use improvement.

Author of Shades of Thomas Paine, a common sense blog with a Libertarian slant.

http://shadesofthomaspaine.blogexec.com

Also author of Stick it to the Man!

http://www.amazon.com/Stick-Man-Richard-Moyer/dp/1484036417