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Google's ConstituteProject.org: Compiling World's Constitutions; 'Because You're Not Using nor Following Yours'-Edition

Constitute -- A new way to search the world's constitutions

http://youtu.be/b0BsJuN0OAs
Google Ideas
Published on Sep 23, 2013

Google Ideas supported the Comparative Constitutions Project to build Constitute, a new site that digitizes and makes searchable the world's constitutions. Constitute enables people to browse and search constitutions via curated and tagged topics, as well as by country and year. The Comparative Constitutions Project cataloged and tagged nearly 350 themes, so people can easily find and compare specific constitutional material. This ranges from the fairly general, such as "Citizenship" and "Foreign Policy," to the very specific, such as "Suffrage and turnouts" and "Judicial Autonomy and Power."

constituteproject.org

Google launches 'Constitute,' a new tool for designing governments

By Russell Brandom on September 23, 2013 11:40 am @russellbrandom

The process of drafting a constitution is usually long, intricate and politically fraught — but with 160 different active constitutions to draw from, it's also uniquely amenable to data analysis. With that in mind, Google has partnered with the Comparative Constitutions Project to launch a new site called Constitute, devoted to comparing the world's constitutions. It examines nearly 350 constitutional themes, organized into topics like the duties of a citizen and the role of the executive. The result is a comprehensive view of how countries structure their governments, and a powerful tool for any would-be founders. As one co-founder put it, "If want to see what African constitutions have to say about the rights of women after 1945, you can do that in just a few clicks."

"Our aim is to arm drafters with a better tool for constitution design and writing," Google said in a post accompanying the launch. That's a niche audience, to put it mildly, but it's also an important one. In 2013 so far, Zimbabwe has already voted on a new constitution, and 2012 saw both Somalia and Syria adopt new founding documents, along with nearly half a dozen revisions from other countries. The hope is that, if Constitute can influence the next generation of constitutions and give citizens a greater sense of ownership over the documents, it could have a huge impact in years to come.

H/T: InfoWars.com



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post-noon

buh rump bump.

Predictions in due Time...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zGDisyWkIBM

"Let it not be said that no one cared, that no one objected once it's realized that our liberties and wealth are in jeopardy." - Dr. Ronald Ernest Paul

A good tool but

they didn't think much about user friendliness and ease of aggregation.

I'd like to have this info available via an interface that allows each data item to be summarized and then tabulated or charted. I'd also like to see some sort of voting system or input system where the most favorite option rises to the top and gets refined into something everyone likes. I think only that way will people begin to see the pros and cons work in the real world.

hey, that's exactly what I said,

when I tried accessing 2A in the American Constitution!

LOL, I just simply HAD to make sure whether those anti-gunners at Google may have altered the Second Amendment or not, as we've been seeing in news blurbs about HS AP Textbooks utterly destroying the meaning of the 2nd Amendment.

But, google or not, I'm sure the interface will continue to evolve and improve, as time goes on.

Predictions in due Time...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zGDisyWkIBM

"Let it not be said that no one cared, that no one objected once it's realized that our liberties and wealth are in jeopardy." - Dr. Ronald Ernest Paul

updated

...

Predictions in due Time...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zGDisyWkIBM

"Let it not be said that no one cared, that no one objected once it's realized that our liberties and wealth are in jeopardy." - Dr. Ronald Ernest Paul