5 votes

Video: Civilization is a Human Cage

Enjoy. Thoughtful comments appreciated.


http://youtu.be/DSwygqign_8

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Important commentary on civilization

Thanks. While I agree with much of what he has to say, I don't, however, entirely agree with how he sums things up. Epigenetics is showing, for example, that although we might have a genetic predisposition to a certain illness, we're *not* locked into that but have the ability to change, i.e., even our genetic makeup. Also, while, not unlike animals, we were endowed with certain instincts, I think we should strive to lift ourselves higher using the capabilities that humans, un-like animals, were endowed with. Whether our environment is something created by others, or God, or something we create ourselves, I think what's important, bottom line, is that it's serving us.

I agree that the current environment is not. I wasn't surprised to see clips of The Gods Must Be Crazy. It's what I immediately thought of. (Its intro says it all!) The status quo isn't healthy in body, mind, or soul. It's not just crazy, it's crazy-making.

I'm going to check out more of Manning. But whereas I found him (at least that clip) somewhat depressing, although they came to the same conclusions, I find others inspiring, e.g., entrepreneur Gunther Pauli or farmers Sepp Holtzer and Mark Shepard:
~ Pauli http://www.dailypaul.com/comment/3246396?bt=1
~ Holtzer http://www.dailypaul.com/282854/the-agro-rebel-austrian-farm...
~ Shepard http://www.dailypaul.com/302818/mexico-bans-gmo-corn-effecti...

When we try to pick out anything by itself, we find it hitched to everything else in the Universe.
~ John Muir

Thanks for the links

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allegory - ˈalɪg(ə)ri/ - noun - 1. a story, poem, or picture which can be interpreted to reveal a hidden meaning, typically a moral or political one.

Garan's picture

Not as Stark as it's Title

The video was a pleasant way of presenting/contrasting views of natural and modern living.

comments

It's a pretty interesting book.

This is an extremely distracting video.

I don't recall that Manning ever considered the possibility of a voluntarist civilization, though he does outline many of the unfortunate characteristics of the society we have which is built on the foundation of enslavement. I would not call what we have civilization, but "coercive society" or "technological barbarism" like Rome. It remains to see if civilization can develop.

If civilization does develop, I think it will require the voluntary rejection of certain technologies. Maybe those associated with overabundant grain production are among those technologies which should be rejected. The best model I have right now is along the lines suggested by Wendell Berry:

1. The measure of many things should be the effect on health and community (rather than efficiency and productivity).

2. Physical labor at a moderate level is good for the health and mental well-being of most people.

3. People need to be intimately connected with a particular geographic location and derive their sustenance from it.

Add to these ideas the moral imperatives of voluntarism and the attention to defense initiated by Isaac Davis (things of which Berry seems to have no practical concept), and I think you've got a good start on being able to build civilization in a few generations.

Book? This one?

Against the Grain: How Agriculture Has Hijacked Civilization
http://www.amazon.com/Against-Grain-Agriculture-Hijacked-Civ...

Agree that this is a distracting video with all the hard cuts. Better if the video maker just let Mannings words play over the images.

But. The book looks interesting.

The evolutionary road is littered with failed experiments, however, and Manning suggests that agriculture as we have practiced it runs against both our grain and nature's.

Quite possible that this will end in failure, considering humanity's dependence on monoculture crops, and high requirements for water, not to mention meat.

I would not call what we have civilization, but "coercive society" or "technological barbarism" like Rome. It remains to see if civilization can develop.

Interesting. Certainly humanity has achieved towering heights based on agriculture. But are these heights the same as stocks in 1929 - "a permanently high plateau?"


http://youtu.be/MEc7sE7psJA

That plateau turned out to be not so stable.

The Diamond Dog is a real cool cat. | Reporting on the world from an altitude of 420.

We need to end monoculture farming.

I feel strongly about this issue and plan to check out the book. I keep thinking of the Onondaga Indian chief who advised that decisions be made thinking of the consequences to the seventh generation. Really, we're a civilization of such SHORT-TERM THINKERS.

If for no other reason... our status quo monoculture farming - from the West Coast almond orchards of California to the East Coast blueberry bogs of Maine - is contributing to the demise of the honeybee and other pollinators, a crucial part of the food chain. (Already California, Maine, and other locales no longer have enough bees to pollinate their crops, needing to truck bees in from other places... including overseas.) http://www.dailypaul.com/281864/to-bee-or-not-to-bee

You know what, Diamond Dog? Things aren't so Hunky Dory these days! Maybe Bowie was right. Maybe homosapiens *have* outgrown their use...


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pBQ-S6njQQw

When we try to pick out anything by itself, we find it hitched to everything else in the Universe.
~ John Muir

Oh, the nightmares came today

And it looks as though they're here to stay...

The Diamond Dog is a real cool cat. | Reporting on the world from an altitude of 420.