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The State is Criminal; Long Live the State

by Bionic Mosquito

So says Gerald Celente, in a display of cognitive dissonance in today’s interview at the Daily Bell. He does a good job of pointing to the criminality of the system, and then looks to the system to provide salvation.

First, the criminality in foreign policy:

I can tell you how much immoral. How about starting wars in Afghanistan and Iraq – in Iraq with the proof that a war was started that killed at least a half a million people that was started under fake reasons; lies that Saddam Hussein had weapons of mass destruction and ties to al Qaeda. An Afghan war that’s the longest war in American history, the war in Libya that they called a time-limed, scope-limited kinetic action that’s destroyed the entire nation.

Then the criminality of crony-capitalism:

You want to talk about immorality? How about the “too big to fail”? The government mandated immoral act of stealing money from the American people to give it to the banks, financiers and favored corporations?

This sums up pretty well the current situation.

He is able to glimpse the solution:

Under capitalism there’s no such thing [as too big to fail]. You’re not too big to fail; you fail. Big, small, medium, you fail – it’s capitalism.

Yet he cannot draw logical conclusions from this insight. His solution?

…put back the laws and acts that were passed that prohibited the multinationals from taking over the world, particularly the United States, laws such as the Sherman Antitrust Act, the Clayton Antitrust Act, the Robinson-Patman Act and, of course, in the banking sector, the Glass-Steagall Act.

Please stop. The criminal enterprise known as the state, described so well in the paragraphs cited above, somehow is able to morally and judiciously implement monopoly-enforced regulations that will be successful at taming the corruption?

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Celente wants direct democracy

The irony

Of the State fighting against a monopoly is beyond ridiculous. Pot, kettle, black.

Good Job

...in pointing out the contradiction. His faith in the state is not likely to be shaken until the next depression is well under way he has already lost most of his money and freedom.