34 votes

Snowden-level Breaking News: NSA-DHS has RealTime Voice Print Spy Grid! Seattle City Govt CONFIRMS!

"Everything you're doing, goes to the [DHS] Fusion Center!" - Anthony Gucciardi

Here's Seattle PD's official PR on this Spy Grid, aka. the "The Mesh System": This is what statist commies mean by 'We want free WiFi in our cities, NOW!'

SPD Discusses Privacy Features In Port Security System

http://youtu.be/MIg3We8iXbw
SPD Blotter
Published on Feb 4, 2013

Seattle Police Department Det. Monty Moss discusses privacy features built into city's Port Security/Wireless Mesh Network.

EXCLUSIVE: Snowden Level Documents Reveal Stealth DHS Spy Grid
Government documents obtained by Infowars expose massive DHS domestic spy grid designed to track citizens in real time through mega government databases.


Photos by Malcolm Smith

Anthony Gucciardi & Mikael Thalen
Infowars.com
November 12, 2013

Exclusive documents obtained by Infowars from an insider government source have revealed the true origin and nature of the highly secretive ‘mesh network’ spy grid that has garnered massive media attention due to the fact that the network’s strange downtown Seattle spy boxes can track the last 1,000 GPS locations of cellphone users. But as new documents reveal, the grid is far deeper than the media is telling you. The Seattle DHS spy system ultimately ties in with an enormous stealth database that acts as an intelligence hub for all of your personal data.

On page 55 of the “Port Security Video Surveillance System with Wireless Mesh Network” project document that we have obtained, a diagram reveals the system’s basic communication abilities in regards to the Port of Seattle that the DHS has refused to comment on despite funding with millions in taxpayer dollars:


DHS spy system’s basic communication abilities in regards to the Port of Seattle ‘mesh network’ tracking system.

The Infowars team is closely reviewing the document and will publish it in whole soon. More images seen in the extensive documentation:


A documented image of the actual spy system put in place, highlighted in the original document itself.


A further breakdown of the spy operation.

The wireless mesh network, which allows for private communication between wireless devices including cell phones and laptops, was built by California-based Aruba Networks, a major provider of next-generation mobile network access solutions.

DHS Funds Installation of White Boxes That Can Track Population of Entire City
Federal agency, police refuse to explain mesh network planned for “citywide deployment” in Seattle

Paul Joseph Watson
Infowars.com
November 12, 2013

UPDATE: EXCLUSIVE: Snowden Level Documents Reveal Stealth DHS Spy Grid

Strange new off-white boxes popping up in downtown Seattle use wi-fi networks that can record the last 1,000 locations of a person using their cellphone’s MAC address, but the Department of Homeland Security – which funded the network to the tune of $2.7 million dollars – has refused to address the nightmare privacy implications of a system that could lead to the permanent tracking of an entire city’s population.

A report by The Stranger, a weekly Seattle newspaper, exposes how the boxes, which are attached to utility poles and include vertical antennae, can track cellphones even if they are not connected to the system’s wi-fi network.

Aruba – the company that provided the boxes to the Seattle Police Department – brags in its technical literature about how the boxes can keep track of “rogue” or “unassociated” devices, in other words your cellphone even if you have refused to let the system access your device’s wi-fi component.

You Are a Rogue Device
A New Apparatus Capable of Spying on You Has Been Installed Throughout Downtown Seattle. Very Few Citizens Know What It Is, and Officials Don’t Want to Talk About It.

by Matt Fikse-Verkerk and Brendan Kiley
November 6, 2013


A WIRELESS ACCESS POINT (AP) HIGH ON A POLE What are these things for? SPD “is not comfortable answering policy questions when we do not yet have a policy.” Photos by Malcolm Smith

If you're walking around downtown Seattle, look up: You'll see off-white boxes, each one about a foot tall with vertical antennae, attached to utility poles. If you're walking around downtown while looking at a smartphone, you will probably see at least one—and more likely two or three—Wi-Fi networks named after intersections: "4th&Seneca," "4th&Union," "4th&University," and so on. That is how you can see the Seattle Police Department's new wireless mesh network, bought from a California-based company called Aruba Networks, whose clients include the Department of Defense, school districts in Canada, oil-mining interests in China, and telecommunications companies in Saudi Arabia.

The question is: How well can this mesh network see you?

How accurately can it geo-locate and track the movements of your phone, laptop, or any other wireless device by its MAC address (its "media access control address"—nothing to do with Macintosh—which is analogous to a device's thumbprint)? Can the network send that information to a database, allowing the SPD to reconstruct who was where at any given time, on any given day, without a warrant? Can the network see you now?

RELATED:

The Questions The Stranger Asked SPD That They Declined to Answer

by Matt Fikse-Verkerk and Brendan Kiley
Nov 6, 2013

1. Aruba installations typically include the following software/OS and components. Which of these is the city of Seattle using (or planning to use) in the system?

- AirWave Management Platform (AMP)
- RAPIDS rogue identification
- Visual RF mapping module
- TotalWatch RF spectrum analyzer
- ALE Analytics and Location Engine (API)

2. What are some of the current and potential uses of the mesh network, besides transmitting video from cameras? (I know you've answered this at public meetings, but I wonder if the department has a specific operational protocol.)

3. Does the department use, or plan to use, the capability of the mesh network to geo-locate wireless devices (cell phones, laptops, anything with a MAC address)?

***************************************************************

UPDATE 1:

Seattle police have a wireless network that can track your every move

By David Ham
Posted: 8:09 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 7, 2013


Seattle Police Department announced it bought what's called a "mesh network" photo

SEATTLE — In February, the Seattle Police Department announced it bought what's called a "mesh network," that will be used as a dedicated wireless network for emergency responders. What SPD did not say is that the network is capable of tracking anyone with a device that has a Wi-Fi connection. "They now own a piece of equipment that has tracking capabilities so we think that they should be going to City Council and presenting a protocol for the whole network that says they won't be using it for surveillance purposes," said Jamela Debelak of the American Civil Liberties Union.

A spokesperson for Seattle Police said the network is not being used right now. A draft policy is being reviewed by the city attorney's office and will eventually go before the City Council.

The network includes 160 wireless access points that are mounted on poles across Seattle. Every time a device looks for a Wi-Fi signal and the access point recognizes it, it can store that data. The manufacturer of the network points out in a manual that the mesh network can store IP addresses, device types, applications used by the devices, current location, and historical location. This information can be stored and connected for the last 1,000 times a person is connected with a specific device. The network shows up online in public places usually as intersections in the city such as, "4th&Pike," "4th&University" and "3rd&Union."

New Mesh Network Surveillance Testing in Seattle Ready To Go
BoKnowsEntertainment


http://youtu.be/9fHYIfVqBrk
Published on Nov 12, 2013

"How do you like our spying now?" - New and improved wi-fi spy mesh network devices just for you US Inc. Citizen! Now in Seattle Washington, and coming soon to a place near you - real near.
Excerpts: You Are a Rogue Device
A New Apparatus Capable of Spying on You Has Been Installed Throughout Downtown Seattle. Very Few Citizens Know What It Is, and Officials Don't Want to Talk About It.

Seattle Police detective Monty Moss, one of the leaders of the mesh-network project—one part of a $2.7 million effort, paid for by the Department of Homeland Security—wrote in an e-mail that the department "is not comfortable answering policy questions when we do not yet have a policy."

Detective Moss also added that the mesh network would not be used for "surveillance purposes... without City Council's approval and the appropriate court authorization." Note that he didn't say the mesh network couldn't be used for the surveillance functions we asked about, only that it wouldn't—at least until certain people in power say it can. That's the equivalent of a "trust us" and a handshake.

***************************************************************

UPDATE 2: Actual .PDF document/purchase orders/program draft, via Scrbd.com:

Click here to download the document

“Port Security Video Surveillance System with Wireless Mesh Network” -
Seattle

***************************************************************

UPDATE 3:

Anthony Gucciardi (official contributor to InfoWars.com), to whom the Seattle City govt employee and/or contractor reached out to, in order to leak the said "Mesh Grid" related internal documents, summarizes the situation in an exclusive, special InfoWars Nightly News segment:

Gov. Documents Expose Massive Domestic Spying Operation

http://youtu.be/Ox7Cb--RqqY
TheAlexJonesChannel
Published on Nov 12, 2013

EXCLUSIVE: Snowden Level Documents Reveal Stealth DHS Spy Grid

Exclusive documents obtained by Infowars from an insider government source have revealed the true origin and nature of the highly secretive 'mesh network' spy grid that has garnered massive media attention due to the fact that the network's strange downtown Seattle spy boxes can track the last 1,000 GPS locations of cellphone users. But as new documents reveal, the grid is far deeper than the media is telling you. The Seattle DHS spy system ultimately ties in with an enormous stealth database that acts as an intelligence hub for all of your personal data.

***************************************************************

UPDATE 4: When, sometimes public pressure works; overnight, the Seattle PD declared publicly that they're "temporarily" shutting down the Mesh Grid...for now

Seattle Police Deactivate Wi-Fi Spy Grid After Privacy Outcry
SPD admit mesh network was never turned off after DHS testing phase

Paul Joseph Watson
Infowars.com
November 13, 2013

Following a privacy outcry concerning a wi-fi “mesh network” being installed in Seattle with DHS funding that has the capability of recording the last 1,000 locations of anyone in its vicinity, the Seattle Police Department announced last night that it is temporarily deactivating the network.

As we highlighted yesterday, the $2.7 million dollar system, a series of white wi-fi boxes affixed to utility poles with which authorities had planned to blanket the entire city, can track cellphones even if they are not connected to the network. The system can also collect a mobile user’s IP address, mobile device type, apps used, current location and even historical locations.

Infowars subsequently obtained documents from a government insider that revealed how the mesh network was far more than just a means of tracking people’s locations, it was also linked with DHS fusion centers and collected a “wealth of information” from the cellphones of people in the coverage area.

The Seattle Police Department responded to the controversy by announcing that it will temporarily deactivate the network, which was rushed through the Seattle City Council with virtually no oversight, and allow public scrutiny of the system before proceeding.

“The wireless mesh network will be deactivated until city council approves a draft policy and until there’s an opportunity for vigorous public debate,” SPD spokesperson Sgt. Sean Whitcomb said last night, adding that turning off the system involves, “a little more than just flipping a switch.”

“Our position is that the technology is the technology,” Whitcomb added, “but we want to make sure that we have safeguards and policies in place so people with legitimate privacy concerns aren’t worried about how it’s being used.”

Whitcomb dubiously asserted that the network was “operational without being operated” because police had switched on the network for DHS grant-mandated testing and then forgot to turn it off again.

The Seattle Police Department Disables Its Mesh Network (the New Apparatus Capable of Spying on You)

Posted by Brendan Kiley on Tue, Nov 12, 2013 at 7:42 PM


PHOTO: Malcolm Smith

The Seattle Police Department just announced that it has begun the process of deactivating its wireless mesh network, a powerful tool for sending vast amounts of data that also has powerful surveillance potential. In theory, the network (built by a California-based company called Aruba Networks) could track and indefinitely log the movements of any wireless device with a MAC address (phones, laptops, tablets) that moves through its coverage area.

The possibility of a police department creating a historical digital map of the city, or using such a system for real-time locating of individuals, without governmental or civilian oversight has some serious implications.

The mesh network, as The Stranger reported this week, was quietly purchased with grant money from the Department of Homeland Security and whisked through the Seattle City Council without any serious process of review and approval.

***************************************************************

UPDATE 5: Seattle City Govt & PD to its 'peons': PSYCH!

Local Seattle user confirms, the Seattle PD govt terrorists are lying through their teeth; despite announcing that they "temporarily" shut the Mesh Grid down, they NEVER did:

Guess in governmentese-speak, "temporary" actually means 'for the duration of a press conference, or the time it takes to read off a PR propaganda press release.'

Ah... these 'lovable' degenerate fascist govt terrorists bastards; still spying, according to a Seattle-metro Reddit user:

So I went to Downtown Seattle today, November 13, 2013 (self.conspiracy)

submitted 18 hours ago by guitarrr

There were claims that the new Police Department wifi mesh was 'deactivated', but as of today it remains active.

Here are examples taken today: pic of 2nd & Cherry and screenshot of the next street's access point.

Seattle Wi-Fi Spy Network Has NOT Been Deactivated
White boxes still broadcasting signal day after police promised to switch them off

Paul Joseph Watson
Infowars.com
November 14, 2013

Despite claims by the Seattle Police Department that a wi-fi mesh network which had the capability to store an individual’s last 1,000 locations via their cellphone had been deactivated in response to a privacy outcry, the network still appears to be active.

On Tuesday, the SPD announced that Police Chief Jim Pugel had given the order to deactivate the network. However, as of Wednesday afternoon at 4pm, it was still very much active.

A Reddit user posted the image above of the white wi-fi hub located at 2nd & Cherry. While no one expects the SPD to remove all the boxes within 24 hours, authorities did promise to switch off the network.

That clearly hasn’t happened since, as the screenshot below shows, the wi-fi hubs are still broadcasting a signal, giving them the capability to track the location of every cellphone in the vicinity even if it is not connected to the network.




Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

no not that one

theres like 4 episodes that fit the description, i think its the one where that nsa guy who knows about the "conspiracy" is watching her, and mulder hunts him down in the shady part of town.

meow

is the episode you're referring to, in the

post-'X-Files the movie' season, or before that?

it's been awhile since I've watched any X-Files episodes...

if after, are you referring to this one: http://x-files.wikia.com/wiki/Trust_No_1

The X-Files: Season 9, Episode 6: Trust No 1 (6 Jan. 2002)

"The X Files" Trust No 1 (original title)
TV Episode - 60 min - Drama | Mystery | Sci-Fi
Your rating: 7.6
Ratings: 7.6/10 from 623 users
Reviews: 5 user

Mulder contacts Scully which sets off a chain of events involving an NSA man obsessed with speaking and giving information to Mulder.

Reopening The X-Files: “Trustno1”

Reopening The X-Files: “Trustno1”
Meghan Deans
Season 9, Episode 6: “Trustno1”
Original Airdate: January 6, 2002

The X-Files primarily exists in a time and a space of its own creation. In fact, were it not for the ever-evolving cell phones and odd Monica Lewinsky joke, you might think that the show existed in a universe completely independent of our own, one unaffected by politics and world events. On rewatch, this gives the show a particular timelessness, an amplification to the paranoia. “Trustno1,” in contrast, is an episode solidly of its time.

Airing four months after the attacks of September 11, 2001 and two and a half months after the passage of the PATRIOT Act, the episode trades paranormal threats for what was then a fresh-seeming threat: increased government surveillance. Terry O’Quinn plays an NSA agent (had the episode been produced a year later, he no doubt would have been Homeland Security) who has apparently spent the better part of his career surveiling Agent Scully. “You ever heard of the Constitution?” she snaps. “Yes. It’s what allows foreign terrorists to live here

Predictions in due Time...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zGDisyWkIBM

"Let it not be said that no one cared, that no one objected once it's realized that our liberties and wealth are in jeopardy." - Dr. Ronald Ernest Paul

update

UPDATE 2: Actual .PDF document/purchase orders/program draft, via Scrbd.com:

Click here to download the document

“Port Security Video Surveillance System with Wireless Mesh Network” -
Seattle

Predictions in due Time...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zGDisyWkIBM

"Let it not be said that no one cared, that no one objected once it's realized that our liberties and wealth are in jeopardy." - Dr. Ronald Ernest Paul

Wait till...

someone takes one down and hacks it, then put's it back up. We'll see a whole new insanity. Can you imagine the implications of installing your own spy software on one of these boxes and releasing it to the general public.

yup, it's like how many 5th grade genius computer hackers

taking down systems does it have to take, before people realize to NEVER centralize huge databases?

of course, not that statist fascist centralizers care about 'our' privacy, either way...

Predictions in due Time...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zGDisyWkIBM

"Let it not be said that no one cared, that no one objected once it's realized that our liberties and wealth are in jeopardy." - Dr. Ronald Ernest Paul

updated

content edited, pix and vids order shifted.

Predictions in due Time...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zGDisyWkIBM

"Let it not be said that no one cared, that no one objected once it's realized that our liberties and wealth are in jeopardy." - Dr. Ronald Ernest Paul

The REAL question is, is this happening in YOUR cities, as well?

right underneath our noses??

Um, YES.

Why would any of this be 'surprising' now??

Predictions in due Time...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zGDisyWkIBM

"Let it not be said that no one cared, that no one objected once it's realized that our liberties and wealth are in jeopardy." - Dr. Ronald Ernest Paul

update

UPDATE 1:

Seattle police have a wireless network that can track your every move

By David Ham
Posted: 8:09 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 7, 2013


Seattle Police Department announced it bought what's called a "mesh network" photo

SEATTLE — In February, the Seattle Police Department announced it bought what's called a "mesh network," that will be used as a dedicated wireless network for emergency responders. What SPD did not say is that the network is capable of tracking anyone with a device that has a Wi-Fi connection. "They now own a piece of equipment that has tracking capabilities so we think that they should be going to City Council and presenting a protocol for the whole network that says they won't be using it for surveillance purposes," said Jamela Debelak of the American Civil Liberties Union.

A spokesperson for Seattle Police said the network is not being used right now. A draft policy is being reviewed by the city attorney's office and will eventually go before the City Council.

The network includes 160 wireless access points that are mounted on poles across Seattle. Every time a device looks for a Wi-Fi signal and the access point recognizes it, it can store that data. The manufacturer of the network points out in a manual that the mesh network can store IP addresses, device types, applications used by the devices, current location, and historical location. This information can be stored and connected for the last 1,000 times a person is connected with a specific device. The network shows up online in public places usually as intersections in the city such as, "4th&Pike," "4th&University" and "3rd&Union."

Here's Seattle PD's official PR on this Spy Grid: This is what statist commies mean by 'We want free WiFi in our cities, NOW!'

SPD Discusses Privacy Features In Port Security System

http://youtu.be/MIg3We8iXbw
SPD Blotter
Published on Feb 4, 2013

Seattle Police Department Det. Monty Moss discusses privacy features built into city's Port Security/Wireless Mesh Network.

New Mesh Network Surveillance Testing in Seattle Ready To Go
BoKnowsEntertainment


http://youtu.be/9fHYIfVqBrk
Published on Nov 12, 2013

"How do you like our spying now?" - New and improved wi-fi spy mesh network devices just for you US Inc. Citizen! Now in Seattle Washington, and coming soon to a place near you - real near.
Excerpts: You Are a Rogue Device
A New Apparatus Capable of Spying on You Has Been Installed Throughout Downtown Seattle. Very Few Citizens Know What It Is, and Officials Don't Want to Talk About It.

Seattle Police detective Monty Moss, one of the leaders of the mesh-network project—one part of a $2.7 million effort, paid for by the Department of Homeland Security—wrote in an e-mail that the department "is not comfortable answering policy questions when we do not yet have a policy."

Detective Moss also added that the mesh network would not be used for "surveillance purposes... without City Council's approval and the appropriate court authorization." Note that he didn't say the mesh network couldn't be used for the surveillance functions we asked about, only that it wouldn't—at least until certain people in power say it can. That's the equivalent of a "trust us" and a handshake.

Predictions in due Time...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zGDisyWkIBM

"Let it not be said that no one cared, that no one objected once it's realized that our liberties and wealth are in jeopardy." - Dr. Ronald Ernest Paul

updated:

DHS Funds Installation of White Boxes That Can Track Population of Entire City
Federal agency, police refuse to explain mesh network planned for “citywide deployment” in Seattle

Paul Joseph Watson
Infowars.com
November 12, 2013

UPDATE: EXCLUSIVE: Snowden Level Documents Reveal Stealth DHS Spy Grid

Strange new off-white boxes popping up in downtown Seattle use wi-fi networks that can record the last 1,000 locations of a person using their cellphone’s MAC address, but the Department of Homeland Security – which funded the network to the tune of $2.7 million dollars – has refused to address the nightmare privacy implications of a system that could lead to the permanent tracking of an entire city’s population.

A report by The Stranger, a weekly Seattle newspaper, exposes how the boxes, which are attached to utility poles and include vertical antennae, can track cellphones even if they are not connected to the system’s wi-fi network.

Aruba – the company that provided the boxes to the Seattle Police Department – brags in its technical literature about how the boxes can keep track of “rogue” or “unassociated” devices, in other words your cellphone even if you have refused to let the system access your device’s wi-fi component.

You Are a Rogue Device
A New Apparatus Capable of Spying on You Has Been Installed Throughout Downtown Seattle. Very Few Citizens Know What It Is, and Officials Don’t Want to Talk About It.

by Matt Fikse-Verkerk and Brendan Kiley


Photos by Malcolm Smith

RELATED: The Questions The Stranger Asked SPD That They Declined to Answer, by Matt Fikse-Verkerk and Brendan Kiley, Nov 6, 2013

If you're walking around downtown Seattle, look up: You'll see off-white boxes, each one about a foot tall with vertical antennae, attached to utility poles. If you're walking around downtown while looking at a smartphone, you will probably see at least one—and more likely two or three—Wi-Fi networks named after intersections: "4th&Seneca," "4th&Union," "4th&University," and so on. That is how you can see the Seattle Police Department's new wireless mesh network, bought from a California-based company called Aruba Networks, whose clients include the Department of Defense, school districts in Canada, oil-mining interests in China, and telecommunications companies in Saudi Arabia.

The question is: How well can this mesh network see you?

How accurately can it geo-locate and track the movements of your phone, laptop, or any other wireless device by its MAC address (its "media access control address"—nothing to do with Macintosh—which is analogous to a device's thumbprint)? Can the network send that information to a database, allowing the SPD to reconstruct who was where at any given time, on any given day, without a warrant? Can the network see you now?


A WIRELESS ACCESS POINT (AP) HIGH ON A POLE What are these things for? SPD “is not comfortable answering policy questions when we do not yet have a policy.” Photos by Malcolm Smith

RELATED:

The Questions The Stranger Asked SPD That They Declined to Answer

by Matt Fikse-Verkerk and Brendan Kiley
Nov 6, 2013

1. Aruba installations typically include the following software/OS and components. Which of these is the city of Seattle using (or planning to use) in the system?

- AirWave Management Platform (AMP)
- RAPIDS rogue identification
- Visual RF mapping module
- TotalWatch RF spectrum analyzer
- ALE Analytics and Location Engine (API)

2. What are some of the current and potential uses of the mesh network, besides transmitting video from cameras? (I know you've answered this at public meetings, but I wonder if the department has a specific operational protocol.)

3. Does the department use, or plan to use, the capability of the mesh network to geo-locate wireless devices (cell phones, laptops, anything with a MAC address)?

Predictions in due Time...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zGDisyWkIBM

"Let it not be said that no one cared, that no one objected once it's realized that our liberties and wealth are in jeopardy." - Dr. Ronald Ernest Paul