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How about an egg milk punch, grog or an egg flip? A history of Eggnog

From Wikipedia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eggnog

A carton and a glass of eggnog from Montreal, Canada, showing its French facade (English reverse) and the French term lait de poule (literally, "hen's milk")
Eggnog, or egg nog, is a sweetened dairy-based beverage traditionally made with milk and/or cream, sugar, and whipped eggs (which gives it a frothy texture). Brandy, rum, whisky, bourbon, vodka, or a combination of liquors are often added. The finished serving is often garnished with a sprinkling of ground cinnamon, nutmeg, or pumpkin spice.
It was also known as the egg milk punch.
Eggnog is a popular drink throughout the United States and Canada, and is usually associated with Christmas. Eggnog may be added as a flavoring to food or drinks such as coffee and tea. Eggnog as a custard can also be used as an ice cream base.

History

The origins, etymology, and the ingredients used to make the original eggnog drink are debated. Eggnog may have originated in East Anglia, England; or it may have simply developed from posset, a medieval European beverage made with hot milk.The "nog" part of its name may stem from the word noggin, a Middle English term for a small, carved wooden mug used to serve alcohol

However, the British drink was also called an Egg Flip, from the practice of "flipping" (rapidly pouring) the mixture between two pitchers to mix it.

Another story is that the term derived from egg and grog, a common Colonial term used for the drink made with rum. Eventually, that term was shortened to egg'n'grog, then eggnog.

One very early example: Isaac Weld, Junior, in his book Travels Through the States of North America and the Provinces of Upper and Lower Canada, during the years 1795, 1796, and 1797 (published in 1800) wrote: "The American travellers, before they pursued their journey, took a hearty draught each, according to custom, of egg-nog, a mixture composed of new milk, eggs, rum, and sugar, beat up together;..."
In Britain, the drink was popular mainly among the aristocracy. Those who could get milk and eggs mixed it with brandy, Madeira or sherry to make a drink similar to modern alcoholic egg nog. The drink is described in Cold Comfort Farm (chapter 21) as a Hell's Angel, made with an egg, two ounces of brandy, a teaspoonful of cream, and some chips of ice, where it is served as breakfast.

The drink crossed the Atlantic to the English colonies during the 18th century. Since brandy and wine were heavily taxed, rum from the Triangular Trade with the Caribbean was a cost-effective substitute. The inexpensive liquor, coupled with plentiful farm and dairy products, helped the drink become very popular in America. When the supply of rum to the newly founded United States was reduced as a consequence of the American Revolutionary War, Americans turned to domestic whiskey, and eventually bourbon in particular, as a substitute.

The Eggnog Riot occurred at the United States Military Academy on 23–25 December 1826. Whiskey was smuggled into the barracks to make eggnog for a Christmas Day party. The incident resulted in the court-martialing of twenty cadets and one enlisted soldier.

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We call it Rompope

http://laylita.com/recipes/2012/12/20/rompope/

This is a good article with a basic recipe. Rompope is a base for ice cream, cheese cake, and gelatins.

Cheers!

Rompope huh

Very cool Latin American treat.

I like the variation...I actually think I had it before in Puebla.I spent a lot of time at Volkswagen when the new Beetle launched and my Mexican counterpart past this out...

Thanks

For Freedom!
The World is my country, all mankind is my brethren, to do good is my religion.

Does anyone have a good recipe

How do you like your Nog?

For Freedom!
The World is my country, all mankind is my brethren, to do good is my religion.

There's a gal at work

who makes home-made eggnog for us each year. We keep the likker part on the downlow, but this year we had it with Fireball Whiskey. Yum!

When a true genius appears in the world, you may know him by this sign: that the dunces are all in confederacy against him. ~J. Swift

Now that's what I'm talking about

Bring it on

For Freedom!
The World is my country, all mankind is my brethren, to do good is my religion.

I like my He'ns milk with a

I like my He'ns milk with a pour of bourbon

Southern Agrarian

I'm sure for a guy like you its mixed with

Pappy Von Winkle's Family Reserve

For Freedom!
The World is my country, all mankind is my brethren, to do good is my religion.

but, but

what about them duck fellers !!!

I cry fowl

Egg nog makes me feel gay

For Freedom!
The World is my country, all mankind is my brethren, to do good is my religion.