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Why Does My WiFi Signal Go Crazy On The Daily Paul?

Wondering if anyone has experienced the same thing using a wireless connection to the Internet.

I like to listen to AM radio when I browse the web and noticed a while ago how my radio makes a loud, screeching interference noise every time I access a website, but then it stops a few seconds after downloading.

Quite normal, right? Just the WiFi signal interfering with the AM radio signal for a moment. Every time I access a website, an interference noise can be heard, but then it stops. I click on a website, hear a loud screeching interference sound and that's it.

But not on the Daily Paul. The WiFi interference sound is continuous.

I have 8 open tabs at the top of my browser right now. As I write this post, the interference sound on the AM radio coming from the WiFi signal is constant and very annoying. Sounds like an alarm clock going off without end.

These are my open tabs:

Google.com
Infowars.com
Abcnews.com
Dailypaul.com
Drudgereport.com
Foxnews.com
NFL.com
Amazon.com

The second I click on one of the tabs above, the WiFi interference sound stops immediately, except the Daily Paul.

When I click back on the "Create Forum Topic," tab, the WiFi interference sound goes crazy again and doesn't stop - continuous interference can be heard on the AM station.

When I click on the infowars.com tab, the annoying interference sound stops the moment I click it. NFL.com? Same thing. No interference on the AM radio, immediate silence the second I click on another tab. Foxnews.com, the sound is clear without any WiFi interference, just male soap opera sports talk radio on AM radio talking NFL playoffs.

Click back on the Daily Paul, and the interference sound can be heard instantly. What the luck is going on here?

Every other station on my AM radio dial does not pick up this WiFi interference.

WiFi signals have a frequency that can be heard on AM radio, literally.

Why is the Daily Paul the only website with a continuous interference signal from my WiFi connection?

Can somebody who knows a lot more about computers and wireless signals than most please tell us what's going on here?


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I notice it's likely related to video

so I just thought I'd toss in my two cents of experience. When I worked monitors at Gateway in '94, the video cables were yet to be refined very well. We often had this problem and the solution was to add ferrite cores around the cable, often at both ends.

I'm not sure if you can still find these but they're sure easy and cheap enough to test it out.

Also, I would see if it does the same thing when you run a local game (no internet req'd) that constantly updates major sections of the screen at once. As I remember, it was most prevalent when the screen image switched a lot, more than simply moving like in video.

It's the Envolve chat program.

If you open the dev console on firefox (shift control k) you can see envolve pinging http://edge6rx3.envolve.com/fromserver2 or similar under the inspector menu.

It's doing this all the time so it can update the chat with the newest conversation.

You can get rid of it with a javascript blocking program like Ghostery, but to talk on chat you have to re-enable envolve everytime.

Tools of war are not always obvious. The worst weapon is an idea planted in the mind of man. Prejudices can kill, suspicion can destroy, and a thoughtless, frightened search for a scapegoat has an everlasting fallout all of its own.

kindly read the entire thread on this one

This was the first suggestion made by Jon, but WIFI has been ruled out entirely. abcnews also issues constant ajax calls and the envolve calls do not stop when changing tabs.

I AM is all that is. Everything else is malleable.

not in my mind....lol

nothing has been ruled out in this thread AFAIC but we get no real info from OP.

The significant factor to my mind is IT'S COMING THROUGH A RADIO TUNED TO AM BAND. Something is emitting RF on frequencies it's not supposed to. One poster discusses unshielded monitor cables. That's a workable hypothesis.

There is nothing strange about having a bar of soap in your right pocket, it's just what's happening.

Could be the GPU, but

my guess is that it is actually a faulty power supply unit. The GPU pulls more power for the FX and power supply starts emitting emi. I've heard of a GPU interfering with the soundcard so Jive could definitely be correct, but if the radio is a decent distance my first guess is the PSU.

Another less likely possibility could be the CPU which is sometimes fixable by changing the BIOS settings to "spread spectrum".

I AM is all that is. Everything else is malleable.

That too.

Why didn't I think of that? My GPU makes noise on the headphones, and has since day one. But like you say, it could be the GPU stressing the power supply. I chose to tolerate it rather than be without computer while I waited for a replacement.

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"Fully half the quotations found on the internet are either mis-attributed, or outright fabrications." - Abraham Lincoln

for lack of cogent reporting

you might find a local PI with an RF scanner. As Jon says, no normal adapter or wifi transceiver will emit on frequencies that conflict with AM band but there's a chance something is shorting and a smaller chance you might have discovered a hardware hack.

There is nothing strange about having a bar of soap in your right pocket, it's just what's happening.

WiFi signal?

What makes you think it has anything to do with the WiFi signal? I suspect it's either a noisy video card, the monitor, or the cable that connects the two. The thing that's different about DP is the snowflakes that keep moving after the page loads.

Ĵīɣȩ Ɖåđşŏń

"Fully half the quotations found on the internet are either mis-attributed, or outright fabrications." - Abraham Lincoln

Because the sound coming from

Because the sound coming from the radio was instant and obvious every time I clicked on a website. There was no interference noise without internet activity.

The second I would click on a website, I could hear interference noise coming through the AM dial and then it would stop.

It was beyond obvious how every time I clicked on a website, my radio would make an interference noise. I quadruple checked just to make sure I wasn't going nuts.

Click on a website, grrrrrrrrrrr, stop.
Click on another website, grrrrrrr, stop.

Click on the Daily Paul? Grrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr, without end.

"Holiday FX," was the running program behind the constant WiFi signal interference messing with my AM signal.

Why? I have no idea, not a computer guru. All I know is that I can listen to the Orange Bowl now without annoying WiFi interference coming through my AM dial.

Never be afraid to ask simple questions.

Forget WiFi

A tip for reporting computer problems: Just report what you observe, not what you conclude. Leave the conclusions to the long-time computer gurus.

The "Holiday FX" angle supports my hypothesis that the interference is coming from something related to the video display. When you click on a different website, it updates the screen and then stops. But the DP currently keeps updating snowflakes constantly. The snowflakes are painted by a java script. It is possible that the CPU and related circuitry are generating the noise, but I suspect the monitor or the video card.

Ĵīɣȩ Ɖåđşŏń

"Fully half the quotations found on the internet are either mis-attributed, or outright fabrications." - Abraham Lincoln

Joη's picture

thanks & good advice

I did not properly separate given observations.

"You underestimate the character of man." | "So be off now, and set about it." | Up for a game?

Thankee

Of course it could be something else entirely. I suspect video hardware because it produces the highest currents. The WiFi box is the least likely suspect, I think.

That javascript for the snowflakes gets downloaded just once at the beginning, right?

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"Fully half the quotations found on the internet are either mis-attributed, or outright fabrications." - Abraham Lincoln

Joη's picture

yep

no ajax anything after...it's just snow.

And browsers have become very good at caching textual data, so it won't even be asked for on each page load after a first cache.

"You underestimate the character of man." | "So be off now, and set about it." | Up for a game?

Ajax

New one on me. "Asynchronous JavaScript and XML."

Ĵīɣȩ Ɖåđşŏń

"Fully half the quotations found on the internet are either mis-attributed, or outright fabrications." - Abraham Lincoln

I'm on WiFi right now

and not having problems except....

When I go to use the tweet button birdie, it disappears and I have to tweet using another method.

Eh, just paranoia.

This scenario is impossible unless by some miracle someone has the capability to see what you're doing at that moment and throttle your internet speed.

Again, highly unlikely and just a coincidence.

Hm

Is the page still loading?

Edit: Nevermind, see response from Jon below

Joη's picture

you have chat on

(Strictly speaking, AM and wifi share no overlapping bands [but a wifi emitter and an active microwave might!], but clearly you've established a relationship to the interference.)

Here's a network time diagram of things that load on the DP, which anyone can see using Chrome Inspector's Network tab:

The colored bars, or dots, on the right indicate the duration something is loading (note the 'seconds' unit atop this area). The dots are fast and the bars are slow. And the list is the events as they occur in sequence, so things towards the bottom "happen"/load later.

When a page loads, your browser requests several resources from a server or your local cache. This is correlating with your interference pattern. For most sites, this is like the set of quick loading things atop the list that only last a few/hundred milliseconds.

But you have chat on. Once initiated, that is a live process that will always be requesting info from the envolve servers, which you can see as the long horizontal yellow bars that are marked as coming from the envolve domains. Even with chat closed, but on, your browser is still asking the envolve servers to update it every several seconds, so that is likely why you hear a persistent interference.

And while the other sites load things when you visit the page, accounting for the initial noise, you probably don't have a chat option active in them, which would prolong it.

So, try turning the DP chat block off, and see how long the interference lasts when you load a page again.

"You underestimate the character of man." | "So be off now, and set about it." | Up for a game?

Thank you for explaining

Thank you for explaining that, makes perfect sense now. But it wasn't just the chat. I turned the chat off and the WiFi interference sound did not go away.

But then I unchecked everything under Block Configuration, including the chat except the TopVotedRecentTopics, and activeForumTopics boxes.

Crystal clear now on the AM radio.

Interesting how WiFi signals work.

Never be afraid to ask simple questions.

I couldn't help but do a

I couldn't help but do a process of elimination test to figure out which function under the Block Configuration was causing the constant WiFi signal.

"Holiday FX," was the culprit.

Just curious, what is "Holiday FX?"

Is that what makes it snow on the Daily Paul?

Never be afraid to ask simple questions.

Joη's picture

yes, it makes snow, being a holiday effect

First: good process of elimination!

Modern browsers can use a <canvas> element to draw things quickly enough to appear animated because they can pipe rendering those elements through graphics cards. The snow is on a <canvas> element.

Jive was right, I shouldn't've assumed it had anything to do with the network connection. The data also matches page repaints...which Chrome's Inspector has a Timeline tab for! Yaay! Another chart!

(had I heard "recently DP is making this noise", I would've discounted chat in favor of this, because chat's been around, but this snow's new; oh well.)

The diagonal line composed of 2 colors here represents javascript running (orange), which then tells the browser to redraw something (green), script, paint, script, paint, repeat, repeat, repeat, repeat, very quickly, indefinitely. And note the timeframe I zoomed in on here is 500ms or half a second, so this happens at least 30x every second to appear smooth, or up to 60x if your machine can handle it.

An improperly grounded/shielded component (for any number of reasons) in your computer, possibly a graphics card, could be causing it, yes.

Try zooming around on a julia map, you'll probably hear it there. If your radio is on the same line as your computer, try moving it to another outlet. Or further try turning off separable hardware (like your monitor) to see if you can reduce scope.

"You underestimate the character of man." | "So be off now, and set about it." | Up for a game?

Deleted

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"Fully half the quotations found on the internet are either mis-attributed, or outright fabrications." - Abraham Lincoln

Interesting

tell us more about your hardware. Laptop with build in wifi? Have you tested this at the local internet cafe? What kind of modem serving wifi? What AM bands pick up these waves?

There is nothing strange about having a bar of soap in your right pocket, it's just what's happening.