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"Search Terms" Internet Privacy question for the DP

"Search Terms" Internet Privacy question for the DP:

Does anyone know how to keep your "search terms" private when web browsing? This is so that search engines can not collect data on the searches people are performing.

It seems to me a way to do this would be to do an initial broad search and cache those results locally. The next step would be to search your new local cache for the narrowed results. For example, if I wanted to research "Organic Gardening without GMO's". The first thing I would type would be "Gardening". Then I could copy those results locally to refine further. Anyone know if that exists or another way to privatize search terms?

Thread update to clarify what's being asked:

Using a proxy or TOR or Startpage or VPN is not going to protect the "search terms" from being viewed and collected. It's not my pc or browser session I want to protect. It's the words I'm searching on, the "search terms", that search engines collect and use for analytics.

For example, I don't want the search engine to know that I did a search for "Ron Paul Organic food". I want to be able to do a search for "Organic Food", take those results local to my machine or a safe proxy, and then search those results for "Ron Paul".



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Use startpage.com

Clearing your history, etc. won't change anything because your query will have already been made through the internet.

You can do as suggested below and use a proxy or VPN. Or you can use websites like startpage. Or I suppose you could use public computers, like at the library or some coffee shops.

Using a proxy or TOR or

Using a proxy or TOR or Startpage or VPN is not going to protect the "search terms" from being viewed and collected. It's not my pc or browser session I want to protect. It's the words I'm searching on, the "search terms", that search engines collect and use for analytics.

For example, I don't want the search engine to know that I did a search for "Ron Paul Organic food". I want to be able to do a search for "Organic Food", take those results local to my machine or a safe proxy, and then search those results for "Ron Paul".

Startpage does not collect search terms

according to their privacy policy:

'Data Collection

We don't collect any personal information on our visitors. Nada. Zilch. Zero.

When you use Startpage, we do not record your IP address, we do not record which browser you are using (Internet Explorer, Safari, Firefox, Chrome etc.), we do not record your computer platform (Windows, Mac, Linux, etc.), and we do not record your search words or phrases. In fact, the only information we do record is an aggregate total of how many searches are performed on our website each day (a measure of overall traffic), and those overall traffic numbers broken down by language, and statistics on a purely aggregate level.

This zero data collection policy protects your privacy, since your IP address, browser, and platform information can be combined with other data to uniquely identify your computer, your location, or you. It is also important not to record search terms, since they can convey personal information as well. (Think of someone entering their own name and/or social security number.)'

https://startpage.com/eng/privacy-policy.html

That's correct, but they

That's correct, but they bounce the searches off of Google. That's when Google collects the "search terms".

May I ask why

it is so important that your search terms are not submitted to google, even if anonymously, as is done with startpage?

EDIT: You may want to investigate these SE's; I am not sure about their affiliations with google, if they do in fact have any:

http://www.lycos.com/
http://www.looksmart.com/
http://www.gigablast.com/addurl
https://duckduckgo.com/

Data collection allows people

Data collection allows people to create metrics and then make educated decisions on that data. There are certain search terms I would rather not have metrics collected. For example, I would be shocked if Monsanto didn't use Google Analytics to help determine the strength of the GMO labeling bills in CA and WA. They most likely used that data to help determine how much money to put up as opposition. They probably had a formula that factored the polls, media bias, web trends, etc to determine their initial opposition investments and then calibrated as more data was collected. I would rather fly "under the radar" when researching a topic like "GMO Washington State" or "Audit the Fed" bills so that the opposition gets incorrect data. Just imagine if Iowa 2012 wasn't expecting Ron Paul to be a top finisher. They would most likely not have had the poll counting location moved out of state to IL and not have run the smear attacks right before the caucus to the same extent.

Understandable.

Unless you are able to find a search engine completely independent from Google, what you are trying to achieve may be somewhat impractical, as I am sure you realize.

Have you checked out any of those other web search tools I mentioned above? Lycos started in 1995 as one of the first search engines.

Here are the initial results

Here are the initial results of the list:

http://info.lycos.com/resources/privacy-policy
"Lycos also collects aggregate search terms from its HotBot and Lycos search services. Lycos collects this user information for purposes of internal reporting, product monitoring, product improvement, and targeted advertising. "

http://www.looksmart.com/privacy-policy.php
"This might include information regarding traffic patterns through the site and search queries."

This one might be a contender.
http://www.gigablast.com/privacy.html
"Once you understand this technical explanation, the truth is clear. Because it only serves results from its own index, Gigablast is the only search engine capable of delivering true privacy. " "Some search engines on the internet purport to protect your privacy, and they do a decent job, but since they are not actually search engines, they relay your queries to a major 3rd party search engine. But since Gigablast is the ONLY search engine in the United States that only serves results from it's own index and does not have PRISM installed, you know we are not sending your queries off to a major search engine (which is tapped by the NSA) to get the results."

https://duckduckgo.com/privacy
This one looks like a possibility, but I think it still bounces off of another search engine. Their privacy page makes it clear that they are very concerned about privacy.

I'll check them out today.

I'll check them out today. Thanks for the list. My assumption is that most searches are going to be bounced off of Google, Yahoo, Bing, or AOL so that data can be collected. It wouldn't surprise me if the NSA has mandated that all searches either get routed via Google or at the very least copied to Google to make it easier to collect data as they are the defacto public interface of the NSA.

Any ideas on how to keep

Any ideas on how to keep search terms private? I searched for a tool to download the index of an initial search, but haven't found it yet.

I use

how do you know what your.. "computer"

is doing in the first place?
how do you know that BILL3 is not downloading kiddie porn to your ...device,. right now?

I don't think the problem necessarily lies in the collection of

search data by the hosting company. I feel the problem is that they also collect the associated IP addresses.

The data itself is valuable and the reason the services can be offered at no direct monetary cost to the consumer. Who would use a search engine where you had to pay per search? If left anonymous, the data is still very valuable on the market.

I'm sure that search engines

I'm sure that search engines collect data and then sell that data to the market or give it to the NSA. Think of the potential to R&D and marketing divisions if Google notices that there are lots of searches for a certain product or invention. It wouldn't surprise me in the least if lots of people were searching on terms like "false flag shooting" that we would soon start to see press releases dismissing the crazy conspiracy theories.

There most likely already exists a way to privatize search terms, but I have not found it yet.

Search privacy in a nutshell

You could log out of all Google accounts and delete any cookies from Google or its subsidiaries (YouTube, etc). Then use a proxy to mask your IP. You are much more anonymous at that point.

Something simpler would be to just change the History setting under your Google account, assuming you're using one, to NOT save any history. Some say this only hides your history from yourself and others, but Google may still retain it.

I work professionally with search engine stuff all day long, but no one knows all the answers. These are just some suggestions I've picked up along the way.

It's best to assume spooks are listening to all your communications on the internet, and act accordingly.

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I know for a fact if you use Google Chrome...

They store your cache and history online. How do I know? Because there are options allowing you to sync all of that from device to device.

That's not exactly what I'm

That's not exactly what I'm asking about. How does one protect their "search terms" so that search engines can not get data on the types of searches and the words people are searching?