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US Government: You're Not Actually Unemployed!

Great news! It turns out that unless you meet the narrow BLS definition of unemployment, you're actually not unemployed!

http://shadesofthomaspaine.blogexec.com/index.php/entry/us-g...



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The bottom line: there are

The bottom line: there are around 19 million Americans looking for full-time work that can't find it.

What's the source of your "bottom line"?

It is in the graphic.

Each person represents around 3.15 million people (1% of the population), and six of those people (six percent of the US population) that was employed full time in 2007 is no longer employed full time.

If you assume that the country, as a whole, wishes to be approximately as employed as it was 7 years ago, there would be 19 million more people employed full time.

Author of Shades of Thomas Paine, a common sense blog with a Libertarian slant.

http://shadesofthomaspaine.blogexec.com

Also author of Stick it to the Man!

http://www.amazon.com/Stick-Man-Richard-Moyer/dp/1484036417

But the 100 people in that

But the 100 people in that graphic can't possibly describe 100% of the US population, unless you are counting babies as unemployed.

The unemployed

are 42% of the chart.

Yes, that includes babies and everyone else.

So then how do you make sense

So then how do you make sense of the original statement: "It turns out that unless you meet the narrow BLS definition of unemployment, you're actually not unemployed!"

If the "unofficial unemployed" includes babies and whatnot, isn't that a good thing?

I would consider babies unemployed.

And that is also okay. I'm not saying everyone should be employed.

The issue is that demographics that were gainfully employed in the past are being shuffled into this "acceptably unemployed" group for propaganda reasons.

Author of Shades of Thomas Paine, a common sense blog with a Libertarian slant.

http://shadesofthomaspaine.blogexec.com

Also author of Stick it to the Man!

http://www.amazon.com/Stick-Man-Richard-Moyer/dp/1484036417

Also not reflected is the # of under-employed,

those whose industries left America or were downsized, or those who for whatever reason can't find jobs that match their skills/years of experience, who now work at basically unskilled-labor jobs.

When we try to pick out anything by itself, we find it hitched to everything else in the Universe.
~ John Muir

Working part-time

and/or temporary might cover most of that.

Well, certainly some. I'm thinking of

a college-educated friend with decades of experience in vocational counseling for the disabled. After needing to leave for a few years due to a family matter, she *finally* just found a job again - not in her former profession but as a clerk at Walmart. She's among apparently many there whom they keep just below the full-time level.

When we try to pick out anything by itself, we find it hitched to everything else in the Universe.
~ John Muir

Round numbers

Population - 317,500,000 Current Work Force - 155,000,000

Leaving 162,000,000 not working

Elderly - 40,000,000
Under 18 - 75,000,000
Correctional Supervision - 7,000,000
-------------------------------------
Total - 122,000,000

+162,000,000
-122,000,000
------------
>40,000,000

What am I missing?

how many of the working actually work for the government?

Its an interesting tangent.

Non-working spouses

Some women (and some men) are supported by their spouses and have no intention of working outside the home.

I have no idea how you quantify that number. My wife was one of them. She is now trying to get a job, without success so far, and so I don't believe she is being counted.

Don't let them hear you

say, 'non-working'. 8D~

I'll see what I can find for that category.

Thx