33 votes

ALERT! New Symbol On Your Credit & Debit Cards (Video)

WATCH FOR THE SYMBOL ON YOUR NEW CARDS:


http://youtu.be/lLAFhTjsQHw

Check your newer credit cards for the Wi-Fi Symbol on it. You need to
watch the video below to really know why I sent this to you. I read
this about a couple weeks ago, and then checked my cards for the
little, Wi-Fi Signal Icon on each one. I found none with that signal
on them, but I was determined to watch for it when my cards came in on
renewals. My first time to see it. I'll not activate that card after
seeing this. I guess I'll go to the bank and see if I can replace it
with a non Wi-Fi, Radio Frequency Card.




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My bank, First National Sign of the Beast Banking....

told me I have nothing to worry about.

I use Id Stronghold's products

I use Identity Stronghold's sleeves on all my cards:
http://www.idstronghold.com/

The owner is a huge Ron Paul supporter, ran as a Libertarian, and is providing a great product.

And this was his truck:
http://photos3.meetupstatic.com/photos/event/b/6/9/f/600_278...

In Liberty,

Curt

Super Brochure: "Right To Bear Arms"
http://www.SuperBrochure.com/

It's 'Contlactless Smart Card, not WiFi.'

What you're looking at is a "contactless smart card".

It's similar to an RFID (the kind you see on "chipped" animals or embedded in products). But instead of just feeding you a constant value (either built in or write-once after manufacture) it is read/write and has persistent storage managed by a little computer, which can run security protocols. (For a credit card application, of course, the security protocols are immaterial, because the card has to provide the account number and vallidation information to readers designed by multiple manufacturers. So it has to conform to a standard, and even if the standard is a closely guarded secret the readers have to be easily obtained and cheap.)

You'll notice that the guy in the demo had bought a card reader, rather than building and writing firmwre for his own card-reading application. Also, once he the credit card info from the reader he didn't program another smart card to respond the same way. Instead he "cloned" the card by writing a mag stripe - a much easier task. (Of course crooks will eventually be able to do a fake smart card. But the mag-stripe 'cloning' is far easier.

These things communicate by magnetic fields, which mostly cancel out at large distances, rather than radio which is mutually-sustaining electric and magnetic fields and propagates indefinitely, weakening mainly by spreading out. They have a coil and work at a frequency far below one where the loop would work well as an antenna. In this case the signal falls off with the cube of the distance, much more abruptly than the square law of a radio signal. It's less abrupt than the exponential decay of an evanescent wave, but a coil is far easier to fabricate than a wiring array mimicing the external side of a total-internal-reflection situation.

With a cube law rather than a squre law attenuation with distance the signal drops by a factor of eight, rathder than four, every time the distance doubles. Also, the card is powered by a signal from the reader's coil. So if you want to interrogate the card you have to be within a few inches (unless you want to use a giant coil and a LOT of power), though you can observe a transaction from substantially farther - like several feet - with sensitive equipment. (A coil around / built into a doorway or something under a big floor mat ought to work pretty well, though.)

The WiFi symbol has a dot at the center, typially has three arcs and an angle of about 90 degrees. The arcs represent propagating waves - which is accurate. The contactless smart card symbol typically omits the dot, has four arcs, and a narrower angle. It's also a misnomer, since little of the energy of the communication ends up as a propagating wave.

None of which makes the risks of invisible, unauthorized, access any less. (It just has to be really close, rather than from blocks away with a directional antenna.) The referenced news article is dead-on in that department.

= = = =
"Obama’s Economists: ‘Stimulus’ Has Cost $278,000 per Job."

That means: For each job "created or saved" about five were destroyed.

Thanks for all that info

For a distanced reader, am I right in concluding such a reader would be readily detectable and traceable?

Defend Liberty!

Only from a bit more than the

Only from a bit more than the area where it could read the card.

= = = =
"Obama’s Economists: ‘Stimulus’ Has Cost $278,000 per Job."

That means: For each job "created or saved" about five were destroyed.

Been around for years

Are they talking about MasterCard PayPass that's been around since 2003? I've been using it at 7-11 for years through my debit.

bump!!!!!!!!!!!

bump!!!!!!!!!!!

aha

tinfoil will protect!

ok, now I want to know

what do I need to embed in my duct tape wallets to protect against reading?

Defend Liberty!

robot999's picture

You can ask

your credit card company to remove it and send you a new card. I did that, and it worked. (Before doing that I used the Low Tech - hole punch - solution. Either way, I recommend dumping this "technology" asap.

"Government is the entertainment division of the military-industrial complex". - Frank Zappa

Even better!

Try an 'Armadillo Dollar'.

http://www.armadillodollar.com/

Rights are like muscles; you must exercise them to keep them fit, or they will atrophy and die.

good but old info

RFID (not wi-fi) has been around for years and they've been putting them in CCs for the past decade or so. I remember back in 2006 my debit card had a RFID chip.

They became unpopular in the US because of issues with scanners being able to grab your bank details but are still really popular in Europe.

Unless they have fixed the security problems, I don't see why they would reintroduce them into the US market.

microwave it :D

microwave it :D

Low tech fix

When I first heard of this a few years ago, I checked all my cards and found that only my ATM card was afflicted. By shining a bright LED flashlight through the card, I was able to locate the chip. I then used a hole-punch to remove it. Quick and simple. The card still works in the ATM because the magnetic strip is unaffected.

I Have Been Aware Of The New Technology For Years

I use a security sleeve for all my chipped cards...

me too. I also have one of

me too. I also have one of those aluminum wallets.

You can also get one of those 'Stronghold' bags. You can throw credit cards, passports, drivers licenses (some states starting/planning to introduce chipped ID's) , cell phones, etc. in there and all signals are completely blocked.

“Let it not be said that no one cared, that no one objected once it’s realized that our liberties and wealth are in jeopardy.”
― Ron Paul