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Maidsafe.net will change the world, even more than Bitcoin.

If you were one of the one's bashing Bitcoin at $10, here is your chance to miss out on another opportunity of a lifetime. This is a libertarian's wet dream. But as we saw with Bitcoin not all libertarians can agree on what technological solutions offer.


http://youtu.be/Wtb6L7Bg3zY



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Incentive against war

If this technology were to actually become pervasive to the point that everything was stored this way then large-scale war would not be possible. This is because taking out the infrastructure of a significant portion of the global storage grid would risk too many people losing data.

That said, the security hole in this technology is keyloggers. All the NSA needs is a keylogger on one of the computers you log in on and they've harvested your key. Now they have access to all of your data. There are ways around this problem, though.

You're right about the keyloggers

But that applies to any computer security that requires you to type in a password of any kind through a keyboard (As an aside, wireless (bluetooth) keyboards worry me too. No need for a keylogger on the machine itself, but simply a receiver that can detect signals).

"Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God! I know not what course others may take; but as for me, give me liberty or give me death!" - Patrick Henry

interesting

sounds like a ethereum and bitshares mesh network. bitshares looks to be the first to market with this tek but unfortunately their marketing sucks compared to ethereum.

i wonder what the negatives of maidsafe are compared to bitshares and ethereum?

Official Daily Paul BTC address: 16oZXSGAcDrSbZeBnSu84w5UWwbLtZsBms
Rand Paul 2016

To update

Their crowdsale of the initial 10% of Safecoins made 6 million usd in 5 hours. As far as I know, thats the largest crowdfunding effort in history. (Correct me if im wrong)

Also, fyi, their coin is not just another bitcoin clone, but is backed by actual resource on the network (hard drive space), therefore, instead of burning electricity mining bitcoins, when that processing power does little of value besides propping up the coin, Safecoin is generated through offering hard drive space to other users on the network. It has actual value.

Fascinating, and very exciting.

"Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God! I know not what course others may take; but as for me, give me liberty or give me death!" - Patrick Henry

how can one invest?

looks like they had some issues with mst but held some coins back for btc investors.

Official Daily Paul BTC address: 16oZXSGAcDrSbZeBnSu84w5UWwbLtZsBms
Rand Paul 2016

Yeah

What happened was that they had drastically underestimated the level of interest out there; the crowdsale was meant to go for 30 days, or until all of the initial 10% of SafeCoin had been sold. They sold 75% in five hours (USD 6,000,000).

The problem with MSC was because they were selling through MSC and BTC. The MSC orders were automated, because they were using the MSC blockchain(?) to automatically return coin to the MSC holders. The BTC sales, though, were being processed manually. So many BTC people got in very early, but the processing of the orders was so slow, and MSC so fast, that they realised that the MaidSafeCoin would sell out before they could process the BTC orders. This would mean that many BTC people who had gotten in early would not receive their coin. So they purchased the remaining MaidSafeCoin for MSC themselves and allocated a total of 50% of all the coin to BTC holders, to be fair. Also, to compensate everyone for the rule change in the middle of the sale, they gave a 40% bonus to all investors who managed to invest on time.

Needless to say, some MSC people felt burned, as they missed out on MaidSafeCoin, and had also converted their BTC to MSC, to take advantage of a better exchange rate between MSC->MaidSafeCoin, but were left holding their MSC, which subsequently crashed in value.
I think they did the right thing at the time, but clearly it's a lesson learned in not underestimating demand/supply.

If you want to get into MaidSafeCoin, it's being traded here:
https://masterxchange.com/market.php?currency=maid
At the time of this post, it's also being offered for sale at marginally cheaper than I bought it through the crowdsale.

There's also a bunch of people selling MaidSafeCoin on Bitcointalk.org

Other investment options are to look at setting up a vault on day one (where you offer HDD space to network). You get paid in SafeCoin for this.

"Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God! I know not what course others may take; but as for me, give me liberty or give me death!" - Patrick Henry

I wanted so badly to buy an

I wanted so badly to buy an allotment during the crowdfunding effort but needed that cash for other things. I was sad and happy at the same time to see they sold out when I checked the website. Maybe I'll be able to get in if they run another fundraiser. I'm also considering to get in on making computer resources available in return for the safecoin earnings.

Back when bitcoin was just getting started I very nearly bought some when they were extremely cheap. It was like 10 or 20 cents per coin, if I'm remembering correctly. The part that did not fit quite well with me was all the effort to 'mine' the bitcoins just to get the coin... there was no other tangible benefit. With MaidSafe it appears as though the coins will be traded for computer resources which will actually be put to productive use.

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You can buy here

https://masterxchange.com/market.php?currency=maid
At the time of this post, the lowest selling price was lower than the crowdsale price.

Yes, 'farmers' (as opposed to BTC 'miners') will be paid in SafeCoin based on how much storage they offer, also CPU speed, bandwidth etc. The main idea is that it's based on storage though.

"Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God! I know not what course others may take; but as for me, give me liberty or give me death!" - Patrick Henry

i wish i saw this thread earlier

i kept seeing maidsafe stuff on reddit the last few weeks but ignored it mostly because of the name. for some reason i kept thinking it was some kind of btc cold storage service lol. i still need to do more research but i like what i see so far.

Official Daily Paul BTC address: 16oZXSGAcDrSbZeBnSu84w5UWwbLtZsBms
Rand Paul 2016

.net addresses are worth far less than .com addresses

Never get a .net unless the domain name is integrated with the extension, like "fish.net" or something like that.

I like beig.net

and Cafe Du Monde.

Gamechanger

If it at all lives up to its billing.

Possibilities for mass surveillance greatly reduced, much
in the way of conventional cyber attacks, malware and such
rendered ineffective, need for the "cloud" greatly reduced or
eliminated.

Lots of upside for we the surveilled and downtrodden but I can't
see the NSA, Google, Cisco, Microsoft and the like being too pleased
at the prospect of this taking off...

I don't buy it.

Two reasons:
1) Whoever writes code can decipher it.
2) Most people can't keep secrets, so...

Freedom is the ability to do what you want to do.
Liberty is the ability to do what you ought to do.
"Where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is liberty." 2 Corinthians 3:17

so you're saying

That whoever wrote the code for pgp can decrypt any message encrypted with pgp?
I don't think that would hold up to the open source community's scrutiny very long, considering that its open source, and so if anyone who wrote the code can decrypt it, then anyone who can read and understand the code could also decrypt it, and then there would be no open source encryption applications in existence. Or at least, any that worked.

But that is not the case, is it? Pgp and other open source decryption programs can protect data very well, even though everyone can access the code.

"Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God! I know not what course others may take; but as for me, give me liberty or give me death!" - Patrick Henry

I admit...

...I do not know a lot about programming. So you're telling me that those who write computer code can't decrypt it? I must be missing something, and would be glad to be schooled in decryption and how it works. This is one area where I would love to be wrong.

I was at a meeting not too long ago where someone who used to work for the government stated that all the decryption efforts people take are not all that difficult to decrypt by the government due to their tremendous resources.

So, I'm just a bit skeptical and prefer to err on the side of caution.

Would love to understand better.

Anyone else have any knowledge about this?

Freedom is the ability to do what you want to do.
Liberty is the ability to do what you ought to do.
"Where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is liberty." 2 Corinthians 3:17

Think of it as though it was

Think of it as though it was a lock for a door which was impossible to unlock unless you had the key. It could not be picked, broken or opened in any other way other than using the key.

Making a bunch of keys to try would be fruitless because this particular lock can use a billion quadrillion million different key designs, basically a near infinite number of possible keys which would take many lifetimes just to try them all in order to find the one key that works the lock.

Just as the mechanical engineers who designed the lock do not posses the key for your lock, the software programmers who created the encryption software do not possess the key to unlock your encrypted/locked data.

...

good analogy

++

Well, there are many different types of

encryption programs.

Not all methods are created equal. There are indeed ways to 'crack' encryption.

Just to make sure we're on the same page; 'decrypting' computer code is distinct from decrypting encrypted data.

Code is a set of instructions to ask the computer to do something. This is a computer program (essentially). When the coder has written the program, another program called a compiler compiles these instructions into object code (usually assembly code), and then further into machine language (zeros and ones).
Instructions >> Assembly Code >> Machine Language
The program is then runnable on your computer.
Anyone could, with time and the right software tools, reverse this process, and get back to a set of instructions.

But this is not encryption 'code'. It can be confusing, because 'code' is a way we refer to computer code, but also how some refer to encoding (encryption) techniques (Like when you were young and you might have 'coded' a message by replacing each letter with another letter, scrambling the message).

Different encryption techniques have different strengths. Some use a public/private key technique
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Public-key_cryptography.
PGP uses this technique and others to secure data
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pretty_Good_Privacy

Now, one way you could attack this method of encryption, would be to get your hands on both keys used to encrypt the data. That's not the easiest thing to do, however (for whom, though?). Although this entirely depends on what system you run, and what security safeguards you have in your system.
If your private key is stolen, though, thats not the fault of the encryption algorithm itself. That's because of the security of your system.

Many of the weaknesses in systems come about because people prefer convenience over security. For example, with the public key encryption mentioned above, you could, having encrypted your data, write down your private encryption key, remove all traces of it from your computer, and lock it in a safety deposit box. The problem there, though, is that if you need to use it again, well you get the idea. You have to reverse these steps. PITA.

Another example of this is password length. With computing power growing very very quickly, a password that used to take 500 years to crack, now can take days, or weeks. That's insecure. But each extra character you use in your password exponentially increases the time it takes to crack the password. My password is more than 20 characters long, and includes lowercase letters, uppercase letters, numbers and symbols. It would take an attackers computer much longer to crack my password than the average 5-8 character passwords most people use. So an encryption method, combined with my password length, provides much better protection than the same encryption method with a shorter password (because they can simply ask their computer to repetitively guess at the password). The method to crack passwords is called brute-force, and an attackers computer will simply try to open the encrypted data by trying umpteen-million passwords until they get one that works. But of course, this takes time.
Eg:
A one-character password would take 0.0000000025 seconds
A 2-char password would take 0.000000324 seconds
An 8-char password would take 3 hours
My password would take 2 undecillion years

But these numbers are based on using a desktop pc. So if the NSA has a computer that is 1 billion times faster than a desktop pc, or uses many threads to crack the password, then it could take them only 2 Septillion years to crack my password. (Note that things are more complicated than this, and other aspects of passwords, such as english phrases can considerably weaken the password)

https://howsecureismypassword.net/
http://www.passwordmeter.com/

This is realistically a problem for many people.

There are weaknesses to every method, and for me, I usually combine different encryption methods. Each additional layer of encryption can exponentially increase the computing power needed by attackers to expose the data.

So, in conclusion, people who write computer code/programs that encrypts and decrypts encrypted data cannot necessarily decrypt any data encrypted with that program. There are ways to try to attack that data, but even with massive resources, the road is not necessarily easy for an attacker to compromise the encryption.

Re: the person who said that decryption efforts people take are not all that difficult to decrypt - As we have found out through Snowden's info, the NSA indeed has devoted enormous resources to cracking systems, high and low. But most of what I have seen involves hijacking of data, from insecure systems themselves (where the information was probably not even encrypted anyway), or by coercing companies like Google, Microsoft, Apple etc to release the data they have directly. I don't believe for one second that Facebook data is secure, which is why I don't have a Facebook account...

Also, there have been other issues with certain encryption protocols.
The RSA algorithms had been compromised by NSA interference. Essentially they paid them a lot of money to compromise their encryption method.
http://www.techdirt.com/articles/20140422/12243126991/nist-f...

The moral of the story for me is this: If you don't use encryption, they have your data. Period. If you do use encryption, but use it poorly, then they will get your data. Eventually, and after some work (usually). If you use it well, then your data is usually (absent situations like NSA/RSA collusion), for all intents and purposes, irretrievable. (Eventually it could be retrieved, but its unlikely the government has the resources to go after the data. Also, think about whether they would prioritise you over others. Then again...) Also, note RSA, Microsoft et al are all private companies. One could make the point that these closed-source software providers, operating in the environment we live in today (one with very powerful governments) are not the ideal gatekeepers for developing encryption (because they can be coerced). This is where open-source software has it's strength. While I am definitely a capitalist, and in now way an 'all-software-should-be-free' advocate, open-source in this case (and other cases, such as internet infrastructure) is particularly suited. This is because anyone can check the computer code for vulnerability. While not being perfect, it makes for a much more secure solution.

I completely agree with being skeptical and erring on the side of caution. We know the government(s) want to track everyone, and we know they have ways of compromising encryption. But that doesn't mean that they can compromise every encryption method, and it doesn't mean they are all powerful. After all, Snowden is still out there and communicating electronically. And they haven't got 'em yet (Presuming he's not working for them still. One can never assume. But hopefully it's not the case).

But put it this way, if you don't use encryption, you're handing your data over on a silver platter.

The real issue with this whole conversation is that one has to actually be Snowden to be (nearly) totally secure. And that's what MaidSafe and people Kim Dotcom are trying to change. So, by default, people's data can be encrypted without them having to even think about it.

"Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God! I know not what course others may take; but as for me, give me liberty or give me death!" - Patrick Henry

Another example of attempted

Another example of attempted decryption is with the Brazilian banker's hard drive from a few years ago which was encrypted with truecrypt. Brazilian authorities spent months trying then requested assistance from the FBI which attempted for around a year. Neither gov was successful at cracking truecrypt security/encryption.

...

YES!

I'm a regular user of truecrypt. Its a great program. I have been interested in using it to encrypt my entire OS, but last time I checked, it was only possible with Windows (and I rarely boot my Windows install).

"Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God! I know not what course others may take; but as for me, give me liberty or give me death!" - Patrick Henry

Seems as though they have a

Seems as though they have a lot of great ideas but none yet implemented. I am really liking all this very much, though.

Believe it or not, over the past handful of years I actually thought about several of the concepts which they describe in the video. That makes it even more exciting with the possibility now that some of these ideas could soon become reality!

...

They are in Beta, mostly

And their API is in Alpha.

Launch is in a few short months.

I have built their code and got it working on my local network. Some functionality isn't there yet, but is coming soon. So they have implemented, and the system works.

"Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God! I know not what course others may take; but as for me, give me liberty or give me death!" - Patrick Henry

Everyone hates that investment

They either lost out on or just missed entirely. Thanks for the new material.

This video...

is a basic overview, the articles on the site go into more detail, and videos on youtube go into even more technical details. Please let me know what you think.