41 votes

Stranger danger mamby pamby bull crap is depriving your children.

It's time to make a mountain out of a mole hill and no better cause.

We have this 100% opposite feeling about child rearing and I do feel this fight is best subjected to the light of day.

I responsed to this post about how we love our children and caress them and somebody was like eeeeeeew that's not cool, and you aren't allowed to talk about yumming them up yum yum yum....and how children are so beautiful you just want to live inside their skin.

Anyways I thought I would just tell you how different the place where I came from was.

I grew up on a mountain that we owned in a town that we owned most of that too and everybody knew us and we knew them and there were practically no rules, only encouragement.

Everyplace in town we needed to get to including school we ran through the woods because being a good runner was a value system.

When we got to school, the town drunk was there to meet us. He was called Mr. Finch. He was a WW2 vet that didn't come back right from the war. Every now and then he would put on Sinatra on the loud speakers at school and he would literally dance with a mop but man he really made that mop look like it was enjoying itself. But his other job was he was the town constable. See becaues in our world, the one that was, you didn't ostrasize the town drunk, you gave him a gun and a badge and you put him directly in contact with small children.

We could go anyplace we wanted and do anything we wanted short of burning the whole town down which I think we tried at least twice. We got to fish in every pond, we got to swim in every river, we got to climg every tree, it ALL BELONGED TO US and when it thundered and stormed we piled into whomever's house was closest, we barely knocked on the doors and every house, every adult was always cramming food down our hungry throats. And if it was really snow-stormy we'd just camp out at whomever's place, it didn't matter and the adults were either on the phone or sending signals like a fire that says "hey if you happen to notice an absence of kids at your house, they are all over here".

And did they touch us?

Man did they ever. Pick us up and hurl us into the lake, swat our behinds when we got a bit too brash, pick us upside down and tickle us and sometimes just smile and touch us and bless us.

See I grew up in an atmosphere of 100% trust. We were the kids and they were our parents and that was the way it was. And it was even that way with our animals. My grandmother would call the bear and they would come to her like dogs and eat scraps from her fingers and if a buck bear got out of hand she would shake her finger in their face and scold them and say "now you be a gentlman sir" and the bear would be all shame faced.

The mare bears used to bring their cubs each year for her to inspect. You guys want to talk about fondling children? I grew up fondling bear and racoon kids. Nobody was allowed to hunt the animals on our mountain and that was called the Promise. It's a very old promise that we believed came from Noah and God that we are to be married to the animals, true animal husbands and there is a promise that if we take care of them, they will take care of us. And everything to us was ALIVE. The mountain was ALIVE. the waters were ALIVE. It's so hard to tell you how but everything had a tunka. A heart. We used to relay messages through trees. Before there was email there was treemail and they can and still do relay simple messages like "we are happy" or "we need help".

That netword still exists but you guys don't use it. The trees don't know why, they think you are angry at them. And they wonder why you don't care for them like we used to. Cause we knew every tree, their parents, this was our forest and we lived with them and they gave us wonderful things like maple syrup and they heated our houses and we used them to build snow shoes but because of THE PROMISE we would always tend to them and nurture them to insure their continuance for the people who need them.

Ok let's get back to this strangely uncomfortabel issue and I'll start by saying that you people seem to have this impulse to clothe children. We let them run around naked and barefoot. And even worse, HORROR OF HORRORS we pick them up and swing them around and do the foot yum game. And always the circles.

Circles. The Sacred Hoop.

Everything to a native american goes in circles. You have a serial concept of time and we have a circular one. The sun walks a circle through the sacred 4 directions, the moon is a circle, the circle is female but out childrens faces are circles, their little arms and legs are circles and yes the adults would caress us and touch us and we just loved it.

I grew up in paradise.

Were there harsh aspects? Yes indeed, they used to beat us when we were under discipline and some parents were harsher and some more lenient and if you didn't like home you just ran through the woods to somebody else's house. And same thing, adult picks up phone, hey are you missing a kid? Well he's over here and he said he did his home work and we'll send him to school in the morning and he'll probably end up back at your place.

I wish. Ho gods I wish with all my heart that I could do that and be that for you and your kids.

Tragically somebody found coal under our mountain. It's not there anymore. All of our people including the bear and the racoons and the geese and the birds and all of it, gone and it's never coming back. That little mountain town is now the domain of rich people with summer houses they never visit. And only the wind remembers our name. And the waters. The water longs for us to sing to it again.

The only thing I can do is try to build a mountain in your heart so that your door be open to children and all you have to do is cram food into them and then they will trust you and you get to look at them and interact with them and be part of their lives and you will be their parents. Like I am gifted to be with this little guy called Dayton (Day-Day) who escapes from his tyrannical mother on a regular basis and just goes peeling down the street naked as a jaybird in his bare feet and nothing else and I'm like this kid has to be part indian. Cause we like being naked, it feels good, you get to feel the wind on your parts. And yes I get to pick up little Day Day and that involves feeling his bony litle butt. Which is totally awesome. He has a cute little butt. Day Day don't care, he's busy using you as a jungle gym, sticking his little hands into your mouth....

And now you tell your kids not to trust strangers and stranger danger and people that interface with children are somehow bent.

OK. I see that too now. I'm just telling you another viewpoint. All I'm trying to do is tell you that you lost something that you maybe didn't know you had. And I'm hoping you will find it again. Because if you do then maybe you can do what was done for me and us kids which is only the most SPECTACULAR AND FABULOUSLY AWESOME EXPERIENCE WE DID GROWING UP.

I GREW UP IN PARADISE AND I DIDN'T KNOW IT.

Can I help you regain it?

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Sorry can't resist: ROPE HIKES

Did you guys do rope hike?

It's insanely fun. You gather up all the kids and literally tie them together with a rope and you set a pace and drag them up the hills, over the hills, through the water, pick a new moon night where they can't see for crap and they are getting tugged and pulled and pushed over each other and laughing hysterically.

But we are trying to give them night eyes.

Know why the guide knows exactly where he is going?

We knew every inch of the land, every rock and every tree and we could navigate by smell or the taste of the water. I can still walk that mountain blindfolded.

But it's not there anymore. Now it only exists in my heart and maybe just maybe in yours.

Find the mountain and make it yours. And you will be rich beyond compare.

There is nothing strange about having a bar of soap in your right pocket, it's just what's happening.