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Anybody getting their gardens ready?

I've been tilling my gardens most of the day.

Getting ready to plant several kinds of beans/peas, tomatoes, peppers, some herbs, sunflowers, radishes, cucumbers, watermelons, muscadines...

=)



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But most plants don't like

But most plants don't like onions so you should plant them on edges of raised beds or further away. Many herbs also help keep pests away. Broccoli and tomatoes do well together.

One thing to look up is legumes. This is a family of plants, including beans, that fixes nitrogen from the air. You can find a number of them that produce good food and make a good green manure to work in at the end of the season.

"Freedom suppressed and again regained bites with keener fangs than freedom never endangered." -- Cicero

Thanks for the tips!!

But I still need all the help I can get...LOL

In Christ,
Dave

www.lionandlambministry.com

www.lionandlambtv.com

Grace be to you, and peace, from God our Father, and from the Lord Jesus Christ.

In The LORD Jesus Christ;
Dave

"where the Spirit of the LORD is, there is liberty." 2 Cor. 3:17

http://www.lionandlambministry.com

Does anyone know

where I can buy organic potting soil?

Kellogg's

Not, not the cereal company.

Kellogg's makes organic compost and planting soil, and is usually found at Home Depot.

Check your local garden centers as well.

Are you saying

we cannot use shredded wheat?

Home Depot...

Is where I got mine, Miracle grow organic. My basil was peaking through the soil in five days, I felt like proud mama.

"If humanity can grasp the basic concept of 'Infinite Diversity In Infinite Combinations', and then accept it for what it is, then there may yet be hope. If not, then the destruction of mankind, at it's own hand, is inevitable." - Anonymous

**************************************************************

Try Lowes

I got mine at Lowe's. I won't touch any of the name brands like Miracle Grow. I don't trust them at all to be what they say. You can also check local nurseries and they should have some too.

Don't know, but

it is cheaper to buy peat moss in the 3.something cu ft bags, and sand, builders, and perlite or vermiculite and mix your own.I mix it up, and then add boiling water to sterilize it. Works great and very inexpensive.

Yeah, but check your soil pH first.

If the soil is the wrong pH, that'll make it worse.

Why boiling

water? I know boiling water increase the breakdown of the medium and the nutrients, if any. Based on the composition, there is no other source of nutrient. Vermiculite helps hold water. Perlite promotes aeration. Peat moss is the main part of the medium, what does it have? You need to add a natural fertilizer. Actually depending on where you are going to do your gardening. Is it pot gardening? or backyard?

"He who exercises government by means of his virtue may be compared to the north polar star, which keeps its place and all the stars turn towards it." Confucius

"He who exercises government by means of his virtue may be compared to the north polar star, which keeps its place and all the stars turn towards it." Confucius

I was refering only to seed starting

soil. You need to sterilize anything you are starting seeds in. If the soil is for growing the plants, or any other plants, one would need some organic fertilizer. You don't need fertilizer in seed starting mixtures, however. The peat moss is loose, and helps the little roots to grow easier, and it also helps hold the moisture.I am a cheapskate when it comes to gardening, and I have comfrey and nettles which I dry every summer, and use them to make a tea for fertilizer for my seedlings once they are growing. It works quite well, and is a very good fertilizer.

Oh, ok..

I got it. You know, it reminded me of using sterilized cotton balls when I started my Clivias instead of sterilized sphagnum moss. It worked.

"He who exercises government by means of his virtue may be compared to the north polar star, which keeps its place and all the stars turn towards it." Confucius

"He who exercises government by means of his virtue may be compared to the north polar star, which keeps its place and all the stars turn towards it." Confucius

Thank you both :)

I will have to check both options. Need to check with my home depot and see if I can get all of those things you mentioned.

Ok...I have a question...PLEASE help

NO WHERE online can I find what vegetables to plant next to what. I mean like a really good layout. Believe me I have searched. Any ideas...

and

Where is the best place to purchase organic, truly organic, v eg seeds and plants?

If I could get some feedback that would be awesome!

In Christ,
Dave

www.lionandlambministry.com

www.lionandlambtv.com

Grace be to you, and peace, from God our Father, and from the Lord Jesus Christ.

In The LORD Jesus Christ;
Dave

"where the Spirit of the LORD is, there is liberty." 2 Cor. 3:17

http://www.lionandlambministry.com

Tyr these...

1) Google for "companion plants" or "companion planting"
2) For a list of online sources of organic seeds, plants and products ordered by best customer satisfaction click here:
http://davesgarden.com/products/gwd/advanced.php?state=xx&co...

Enjoy! =)

Found a site

This site is ok as a companion planting guide. It will at least get you started with simple companion planting.

http://www.ghorganics.com/page2.html

"Freedom suppressed and again regained bites with keener fangs than freedom never endangered." -- Cicero

organic seeds & plants

groworganic.com

You will probably be able to

You will probably be able to find a book on the topic at your local library, I did. A good place to look online would be a "permaculture" garden site. This is an interesting gardening movement which I'm writing up a report on for the freedom movement. They tend to be disorganized and believe too many of the global warming type scams but they have some really cool solutions, like forest gardening.

If you are looking for plant information online, this is a good database site with a focus on food and medicine: http://www.pfaf.org/

"Freedom suppressed and again regained bites with keener fangs than freedom never endangered." -- Cicero

Companion Planting

"Carrots love tomatoes" book!

http://www.amazon.com/Carrots-Love-Tomatoes-Companion-Succes...

"I think we are living in a world of lies: lies that don't even know they are lies, because they are the children and grandchildren of lies." ~ Chris Floyd

Layout and seeds

I'm working with a gardener right now and the only suggestion I received was radishes with the potatoes. Also marigolds help as well with bugs. As far as seeds the place I recommend and use is http://www.jlhudsonseeds.net/ I like their business approach. The webpage can be a little overwhelming when looking for seeds, but the catalog they send out is better. They have a lot of good information on the webpage. Let me know if you have any other questions

I'll add one to that as well

Beneficial insects are always a good addition, such as ladybugs and preying mantises. So is adding earthworms to the soil.

And Alyssum planted around brocoli and other brassicas ward off aphids.

Shop around on seeds, too. Some places have better deals than others, but you need to watch your hot and cold days levels and the mositure requirements as well.

I raised potatoes one year

by laying the cut potatoes on tilled soil, then covering them with a foot of clean straw. When the potatoes were ready, you could lift the straw and pick potatoes without disturbing the plant. The new potatoes were on top of the ground under the straw. Has anyone else tried this?
It worked great for me one year, then the next year it didn't work. I think the kids/dogs rearranged the straw too much, and that portion of the garden had different soil.
I am going to try that again this year as you can raise a big crop in a small space, plant them earlier, and not have to till and pull weeds.

Potatoes

I was told to cut the potatoe into pieces with 2 to 3 eyes on each piece ( i basically quartered mine and had enough), then to let it dry out completely. Then bury it about an inch under the top with at least 8 inches for growth underneath. Also plant the pieces at least 6 inches apart so they don't get tangled. Just a little tip from me, make sure you don't let the pieces dry where the birds can get them.

When you plant potatoes that way

You mound dirt around the plant as it grows, which causes more runners off the plant and makes a bigger crop. Trying to remember----but I'm guessing the mounds should end up being 10 to 12 inches high around the plant. Mounding also helps keep the potatoes close to the surface from being sunburned--the green color---which is actually toxic and is bitter to the taste.

A big greenhouse lamp

suspended from the ceiling in a spare bedroom gets us started indoors every spring, since March temps are still in the 30's. And, yes, we've started. Yesterday I added 60 Wave Petunia seeds for our annual rip-snorting, jaw-dropping, hanging basket dramatics.

Time is my issue

Got lots of plans though. Looking for Citrus, Tangerine, Orange, Kumquat, Rudy Red Grapefruit. Got seeds for Beans, Peas, Tomatoes, Cantaloupe, Watermelon, Beets, and Carrots plus Garlic and Rosemary for a border.
May be a little too late down in central Fla, but I'm going to give it a shot anyway.

Some ideas...

I live in the north, and although I have started plants for the garden in my sunroom, still too early to plant anything. BUT, I am picking parsnips from last year (sweet as honey, being sweetened by the frost all winter ), and green onions, (perennial, egyptian onions, never buy seeds again), and dandelions are coming up. (the only weed that is safe from being torn up in my garden). I have red orach, which i let go to seed every year, so I don't have to plant it, coming up now. Yumm, fresh greens. I also let my lettuce go to seed in the garden, so it pops up everywhere, and don't have to plant much of that. I do the lazy way. permanent beds of lots of mulched beds. No tilliing, (eventually). Also, cilantro and dill and chamomile self seeds every year, so I don't have to plant those either. I live in dry west, drought here, so it is the only way to grow, with lots of mulch. Remember to plant as much perennials as you can, easier, and you get to spend more time with annuals. Parsnips can stay in the ground all winter, giving you your first fresh vegs in the spring.

I have some of my seeds started

in my greenhouse and waiting for it to warm up enough to plant them
outside.
I don't know if everyone is aware of this but there are Yahoo freecycle
groups all across the country. It is a great place to find canning jars and lids for free.

Just got ours

started over the weekend. All heirloom seeds. Purple, black and pick tomatoes. Every color of pepper you can think of. Our only problem is we need a bigger yard. We have grapes, blueberries, golden raspberries. I can't wait. We'll even be trying some potatoes this year, sweet potatoes too!! We use a product called Sonigrow. Its an organic fertilizer that you spray on and then you play music to your garden, I know sounds crazy, but it works!! It not only produces bigger fruits and veggies, it produces more, and faster!!! Check it out. Just google it, you can buy it from several different distributers.

Yes, the spray and chirping music works!

For years we have used Sonic Bloom and the little chirping machine (sounds like birds) and it works. We get Jack in the Beanstalk tomato plants that give 450 pounds of tomatoes in a small area (the 450 lbs are for the area, not each plant) . We chirp the plants until they are huge and covered with blossoms, and then covered some more, and then stop the chirping to let the plant quit making blossoms, and let the fruit grow.

For those who have never heard of this, the chirping sound gadget plays at the exact note that opens up the pores under the leaves to absorb the sprayed on organic fertilizer, Sonic Bloom.