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the meaning of the name sarah palin. freaky!!!!!

I actually stumbled on to the word palin in the greek while studing the bible so I looked a little further on sarah palins name in the greek and hebrew. Pretty wild

OT:8283

OT:8283 Sarah (saw-raw');

the same as OT:8282; Sarah, Abraham's wife:

KJV - Sarah.
(Biblesoft's New Exhaustive Strong's Numbers and Concordance with Expanded Greek-Hebrew Dictionary. Copyright © 1994, 2003 Biblesoft, Inc. and International Bible Translators, Inc.)

OT:8282

OT:8282 sarah (saw-raw'); feminine of OT:8269; a mistress, i.e. female noble:

KJV - lady, princess, queen.

(Biblesoft's New Exhaustive Strong's Numbers and Concordance with Expanded Greek-Hebrew Dictionary. Copyright © 1994, 2003 Biblesoft, Inc. and International Bible Translators, Inc.)

OT:8269

OT:8269 sar (sar); from OT:8323; a head person (of any rank or class):

KJV - captain (that had rule), chief (captain), general, governor, keeper, lord, ([-taskmaster, prince (-ipal), ruler, steward.
(Biblesoft's New Exhaustive Strong's Numbers and Concordance with Expanded Greek-Hebrew Dictionary. Copyright © 1994, 2003 Biblesoft, Inc. and International Bible Translators, Inc.)

OT:8323

OT:8323 sarar (saw-rar'); a primitive root; to have (transitively, exercise; reflexively, get) dominion:

KJV - altogether, makeself a prince, (bear) rule.
(Biblesoft's New Exhaustive Strong's Numbers and Concordance with Expanded Greek-Hebrew Dictionary. Copyright © 1994, 2003 Biblesoft, Inc. and International Bible Translators, Inc.)

AGAIN

1. dis NT:1364, the ordinary numeral adverb signifying twice, is rendered "again" in Phil 4:16, "ye sent once and again unto my need," and in 1 Thess 2:18, where Paul states that he would have come to the Thessalonians "once and again," that is, twice at least he had attempted to do so. See TWICE.

2. palin NT:3825, the regular word for "again," is used chiefly in two senses, (a) with reference to repeated action; (b) rhetorically, in the sense of "moreover" or "further," indicating a statement to be added in the course of an argument, e. g., Matt 5:33; or with the meaning "on the other hand, in turn," Luke 6:43; 1 Cor 12:21; 2 Cor 10:7; 1 John 2:8. In the first chapter of Hebrews, v. 5, palin simply introduces an additional quotation; in v. 6 this is not so. There the RV rightly puts the word "again" in connection with "He bringeth in the firstborn into the world," "When He again bringeth, etc." That is to say, palin is here set in contrast to the time when God first brought His Son into the world. This statement, then, refers to the future second advent of Christ. The word is used far more frequently in the Gospel of John than in any other book in the New Testament.

Note: Other words are rendered "again" in the KJV, which the RV corrects, namely, deuteros and anothen. Deuteros signifies "a second time," John 9:24; Acts 11:9. Anothen signifies "from above, or anew." See the RV of John 3:3,7, and the KJV and RV of v. 31. Nicodemus was not puzzled about birth from heaven; what perplexed him was that a person must be born a second time. This the context makes dear. This is really the meaning in Gal 4:9, where it is associated with palin, "over again." The idea is "anew," for, though the bondage would be the same in essence and effect, it would be new in not being in bondage to idols but to the Law. See also Matt 27:51; Mark 15:38; John 19:23, "from the top." Anothen may mean "from the first," in Luke 1:3 and Acts 26:5. For the meaning "from above," see James 1:17; 3:15,17.
(from Vine's Expository Dictionary of Biblical Words, Copyright © 1985, Thomas Nelson Publishers.)



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