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The All-New Survival Food Thread.

Let's have a good discussion. We are in a temporary spell of deflation, so this is essentially a buyer's market for staples.

We all have our own approach to this topic.I'd like to hear your ideas.

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How will you safeguard your food?

I'm not talking about bugs, mice, or mold but about raids by other humans. If you weren't at home and thieves broke in, how long would it take them to find and steal your food? It may not be likely now but just wait till big-time hunger arrives as a natural consequence of the economic meltdown.

Further, in event of widespread panic, looting and violence followed by imposition of martial law, don't expect armed authorities not to search your home and take your food, guns, and ammo. Are you really prepared to shoot it out with them if you happen to be home when they arrive at your door?

Let me suggest that old, old warning, "Don't put all your eggs in one basket." More precisely, don't put all your food in one pantry. Don't even keep it all on one property. If you have a country retreat, find a way of storing some of your food there, well hidden. Consider burying a few months' worth in sealed PVC pipe sections. Consider investing in a plastic septic tank as a burial vault for food and other items (guns, ammo). Even in your home, try to spread your food cache around so that a food burglar is unlikely to steal all of it.

In your emergency food plans, don't forget to keep a few days' worth in your vehicle in case of being stranded somewhere.

New Hampshire and Ecuador.

Actually I think that is

Actually I think that is more a topic for a "survival gun" thread than a survival food thread. I know there's always a danger of authorities seizing and ransacking anyone's property in a national emergency.

What I believe the first cornerstone of preparedness is, is the food and water itself. If you don't eat or drink, you'll die. Ever since the term "survivalist" was coined in the Seventies, it's been a Gun Show movement centered around buying and hoarding large numbers of paramilitary weapons, camo, gas masks, etc...food was always secondary. That's essentially because food isn't an adult toy, while semi-automatic rifles are a heckuva lot more fun to play with than a five-gallon bucket of wheat.

I think everyone needs food and guns, but if we're going to talk firearms, let's start a firearms thread. There's so much to cover in food itself that it sustains a good conversation by itself.

PS-The stash cache approach is interesting but first thought is that most methods of hiding food underground, such as you suggest, would actually expose it to moisture and weather extremes.

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No, it's about where and how you store your food

in order to keep it from being ripped entirely off by others when TSHTF. I agree that food and water are the most important components of preparedness. But investing in a bunch of food then getting it all stolen from you because it is all stashed in one obvious location is a heck of a way to get ready for Great Depression II. How does that fit into the gun thread?

New Hampshire and Ecuador.

Alright, then going back to

Alright, then going back to what I was saying at the bottom of the post, what about the moisture factor with underground storage?

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Diurnal and seasonal temperature flux

diminishes with burial depth so I don't think that would be a detrimental factor in underground storage.

Aluminized Mylar bags inside of sealed plastic buckets inside a plastic septic tank burial vault should protect against moisture problems for dry food stuffs. Years ago I bought square 5-gallon cans with double rims and lids like paint cans. I painted these with oil-base paint for extra protection.

Heavy-gage PVC pipe with glued fittings should also be excellent moisture protection. I use 6-inch diam. pipe with a cap on one end and a cleanout on the other end, the male and female threads of which have been caked with toilet-ring wax before threading together. They are rather expensive to make but should be an effective long-term solution, especially if the contents are stored inside sealed aluminized Mylar bags.

New Hampshire and Ecuador.

Interesting concepts.

Six-inch PVC with waxed threads strikes me as having a lot of easy possibilities for ground storage. Your idea of using empty (unused) plastic septic tanks is also pretty creative. (Who would ever want to look inside those?)

If you intended to permanently hide dry foods, leaving a cache never to be disturbed unless in a dire emergency, what do you think of vaulting them inside cellulose-insulated walls behind sheetrock?

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bump

for the late crew...

I never really trust

my earth. With all the mosquito spraying that goes on and fertilizing with probably ant killer in it. Plus my soil doesn't seem very fertile since some plants have a really hard time.

has anyone tried making Borts?

I have dried alot of different foods this year.
Now I am ready to try making my own Borts or borutus- meat dried as Mongolians do, ground into small pieces and powder it keeps for years...
Has anyone ever tried this?
I like Jerky but it is just too much trouble as it does not keep well.

cw

Never heard of borutus

Never heard of borutus before. Mongolian culture is interesting--they gave us the yurt, and now powdered beef?

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The native Americans

took their dried meat and ground it up and mixed it with ground berries and rendered fat, and it was called pemmican. It too lasted for a very long time. I dry my hamburger, by frying it in a dry pan until no more steam, and putting it on cookie sheets in a very low oven, and it dries hard, and it reconstitutes just fine. I find that jerky keeps for years if you make sure there is no fat on it at all.

Thanks.. I will be trying these things..

do you ever dry meat in a dehydrator? TIA

cw

Yes, of sorts, but I have only a little solar electricity, and

not enough for an electric dehydrator. I have a thing called "the Pantrie" from Lehman's non electric catalog that hangs over my woodstove. And we have a brick/clay oven in back yard, which bakes, and then stays warm during the next day and the next, and sucks all the moisture out of jerky, or vegs. Here is a picture of it: http://i302.photobucket.com/albums/nn92/hopefulfilled/041108...

that is great!!

and I am guessing it makes awesome bread.

cw

Actually it is a Canadian oven

called a Quebec oven, and built like the many ovens in rural Quebec.

Winter Garden Thread

Someone in the comments down below (letushope, I think?) asked about winter gardening information.

Why, we have a thread on that subject right here on the Daily Paul. If you have more info to add to it, or gardening questions to ask, that's the place to be.

I just thinned out my carrots, and am about to plant beets. I have no idea how to prepare beets or what dishes they're good in, but I guess I'll find out in a couple of months!

drying apples and grapes as

drying apples and grapes as we type!
Do not give into evil, but proceed ever more boldly against it.

Do not give into evil, but proceed ever more boldly against it.

Vitamins

Nothing is as good as fresh food, so if you can grow some, even lettuce and radishes, to supplement emergency rations, you will be much better off.

In any event, multi-vitamins need to be laid up in store along with your emergency rations. Without fresh fruits and vegetables pills are a poor second best, but they can help you avoid serious malnutrition .

Keep them refrigerated until needed. You can get them 300 or so in a bottle at sam's club or similar places for not too much money.

Thanks,

great source of info. bookmarked.

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How much is a years supply worth of food?

I'm thinking about buying that much but I'm not sure how to tell I have that much!
----------
"We will never give up. We will never give in." - Dr. Ron Paul

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"We will never give up. We will never give in." - Dr. Ron Paul

Estimating

First, there are maybe three basic categories of food storage.

First, the kind that don't need much preparation, and that cost a lot.
This includes freeze-dried, MREs, etc. You should have much less of this kind of thing, maybe just enough to get you through a few days. Even this kind of food goes out of date, so you will have to eat some and replace it from time to time.

Assuming you will have a heat source, electricity of fuel, or even solar, during the anticipated time of need, you should think in terms of cheaper, more basic items, and learn to cook creatively.

Beans, rice, wheat kernels, whole dried corn, rolled oats, potato flakes, powdered milk, salt, pepper and other spices, and canned freeze-dried vegetables, canned powdered eggs, canned tomato powder, etc.

Once opened the canned dried products don't keep as well, so think twice about buying them in #10 ("gallon") cans. Smaller cans may be advisable if you have a small family.

Ordinary canned food can supplement the above, but it's generally not a good idea to keep it for much more than a year: fruit, vegetables, chicken and tuna, for instance.

You can probably make up a menu for a week and add up what it would take in the way of foodstuffs to provide that. Then just multiply by 52 and you'll have a good estimate of what a year would require.

Thanks!

----------
"We will never give up. We will never give in." - Dr. Ron Paul

----------
"We will never give up. We will never give in." - Dr. Ron Paul

Deleted Duplicate Post

eom

I wish I could afford all these things...

you all are suggesting, but I'm afraid I'm ALREADY a victim of circumstance. I have 2 advanced certifications in 2 very different fields, and haven't made any money in either of them in the past year...I'm trying to find work doing pretty-much anything, and can't get a job (not hiring or I'm over-qualified, or I don't speak Spanish, of all things) and now in trying to hang on until something comes along, our savings are about gone and we've got nothing comming in...January 1st will be about the time we'll have to give up our house. 1 1/2 years ago, we moved here to the rural country life, to get away from crime and crowds...looks like I can't make it here either.
I have the same plans and ideas as you all (store food, store wood, store ammo, and hope for the best!) but, alas, I will be trying to barter with my neighbors before too long.

------------------
BC
As for me and my home, we will be buying ammo!

------------------
BC
Silence isn't always golden....sometimes it's yellow.

"The liberties of a people never were, nor ever will be, secure, when the transactions of their rulers may be concealed from them." - Patrick Henry

BC

If you have some land maybe you could rent part to people to store boats, RV's etc. maybe that could give you a little income. Good luck I know we will all be facing what you are.

Prepare & Share the Message of Freedom through Positive-Peaceful-Activism.

That's why I recommend

That's why I recommend starting with canned beans, hominy, and peas.

Can you afford a cheeseburger? If so, you can afford to buy a six-to-seven pound institutional-sized can of food.

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reedr3v's picture

It looks like we all need the most basic, practical skills--

carpentry, plumbing, electrical(solar or generator savvy), harvesting wild foods, preserving, etc. more than degrees and certification. Sadly, many of us are city folks with little practical knowledge, few life skills for hard times. All we can do is use each day to educate ouselves in those practical skills, store what we can, strengthen networks of friends and allies. Much to do, maybe little time. Even a lot of us who knew there had to be an economic reckoning didn't expect to see such a fast global
failure.

we are trying to develop teaching aids

boisecountyliberty.com is our brand new site - it is not diddly squat yet. The concept is to try to show what we are learning about self sufficiency as we go. Input welcome! So far, our best advice is GET CHICKENS. They are awesome.

Truth exists, and it deserves to be cherished.

In general

it seems that the majority of us have lost those basic skills in trades that we had 100 years ago or so. We were farmers, tailors, barrel makers, etc. and that knowledge was passed down from generation to generation. Now we're dependant on corporations to bring us our food, clothing, toys, etc. Fewer and fewer people have the basic knowledge to be able to provide what they need themselves. So are we really getting smarter?

And of course, this is exactly what they are trying to do, so when they kick the chair out from underneath us, so few will survive.

People

That's it, just people. Soylent green cometh.

http://killfiat.blogspot.com/