Blogs

7 votes

Medved and Jan debate the Iraq war

Radio host Michael Medved and Jan debate the Iraq war and the principle that should govern our warmaking. Medved finally admits that "national interest" is a vague term that does not mean anything specific. Inadvertently he has admitted he has no principle because he has admitted that going to war when national interests are at stake does not mean anything specific. If a principle does not mean anything specific, it is not a principle because one of the necessary elements of a principle is that it tells you clearly when you should do something and when you should not.

4 votes

Why I am a Republican

When I was 10 years old, Ronald Reagan was elected President of the United States. This affable man, with the easy manner and captivating way of speaking, reminded me of my Grandpa. In a strange coincidence, they share the same birthday: February 6th. For these reasons - the birthday, the way they both spoke, with quiet common sense, humor, and hope for the future - my formative years were spent admiring both my Grandpa and President Reagan. My Grandpa was named Ray Martin, and he died in 1988, at the end of President Reagan's second term.

25 votes

A Little Bit of Liberty Goes a Long Way in Your Gas Tank

Can Newt Gingrich really lower gasoline prices to $2.50 per gallon? With his pro-war foreign policy, not a chance in Hell. Lately, all the talk about government control over gasoline prices coming from both sides of the isle is nothing more than political jockeying in an election year. There are many factors contributing to higher gasoline prices, most of which have nothing to do with national supply and demand. It's all rather technical and geopolitical, but I'll try to do my best to explain.

First, the United States has increased production of domestic crudes by 15 percent over the past two years, while domestic demand for petroleum has decreased. Take note of how many refineries in the Northeast has shut down indefinitely over the past year. So, it's not a problem of oil supply. However, our infrastructure for transport and delivering these home-produced crudes has not grown with the pace of production. The U.S. oil storage hub, for example, is land-locked in Cushing, Okla. Approving large-scale energy infrastructure update projects like the Keystone XL pipeline is a start to de-bottlenecking these supply channels. President Barack Obama dropped the ball on that "shovel-ready" job in a flailing economy that is also down-trodden with high gasoline prices.

46 votes

God is a non-interventionist

As technology has advanced and the world has “grown smaller,” it has become increasingly evident that little miracles don’t really happen. By “little miracles,” I mean people levitating, disappearing, parting seas, or making the sun stop in the sky. If they did occur, we’d be watching them on You Tube. But they don’t. That’s a good thing, because it leaves us less distracted from the real miracles: that we are here, that we live in a universe governed by natural laws that explain the world around us and that we have been blessed with reason to discover those laws.

In addition to the natural, physical laws that cause the planets to rotate around their stars and the plants to photosynthesize sunlight, there are also natural, moral laws. Like the physical laws, we are able to discover these by reason. First, we gather facts that we can observe directly with our senses. We then use reason to draw conclusions from those facts.

74 votes

Love and Sales: How to Win Supporters – Not Just Arguments

As I take up invitations around the country to discuss the Blue Republican idea, I am learning a great deal about how our minds are opened and even changed when it comes to politics. In a slight departure from my usual topics, I offer the following in the hope that other lovers of liberty may find my experience useful in their own attempts to improve our nation ...

No one arrives at his or her political preferences as a result of only, or even mostly, logical argument (despite fervently held feelings to the contrary). Rather, people find themselves most easily convinced by arguments that support political views to which they have become committed for often highly complex reasons that the their conscious mind may never even know.

85 votes

Ben Swann talks Fourth Branch of Government, Free Speech and Delegate Chaos

Ben Swann co-anchor at WXIX Fox 19 in Cincinnati and host of Reality Check joins Daily Paul Radio with Kurt Wallace for ‘Ben Swann talks Fourth Branch of Government, Free Speech and Delegate Chaos’ to discuss how he approaches reporting the facts of complex issues and our founding fathers emphasis on free speech, the first amendment and freedom of the press. He also discusses reporting on the delegate process and the overwhelming evidence in not counting the votes in Maine plus proceedural violations at caucuses/delegate meetings in Missouri and Georgia.

Listen Here!





50 votes

Michael Steele interview grabs the attention of journalists

Michael Steele's interview grabs the attention of the surrounding journalists. You can listen to their comments in this behind-the-scenes look at the interview process and thereafter. You can observe the effect of Socratic interviewing on what would otherwise be a blasé audience. Furthermore, you can get a glimpse of Jan Helfeld and Michael Steele letting whatever hair they have left down. Watch Jan Helfeld working hard to bring you these interviews. The discussion with Michael Steele continues in Postmortem 2.

http://youtu.be/i9Z86A6XW_I

15 votes

We’re Only 11 Weeks into a 9 Month Primary Cycle

I know, it feels like these primaries have gone on forever, but you know what – it’s only been 11 weeks since the first in the nation caucus. I stood before three precincts in Iowa on a Tuesday night just 11 weeks ago and spoke about Ron Paul. I said some good things. Lots of people said good things about all kinds of candidates. One woman even cried as she spoke about Santorum. One man stood up and said something bad about most of the candidates. He cited lots of statistics and spoke as if he were some kind of expert on how Romney was the only electable option.

That was on January 3, 2012, before anyone in the United States had cast a ballot, even before any exit poll had been taken. Mitt Romney was nothing but a former governor who lost to the guy who lost to Barrack Obama. That doesn’t exactly scream electable.

And thirty minutes later straw poll results were tallied. Mitt Romney wasn’t really electable in that room. Ron Paul was – in all three precincts, in fact, he had the most votes in each of those three precincts (one was only a tie). It will be months before anyone will have a hunch about the all-important question “Who won Iowa?” After all, it’ll be the delegates selected at the Iowa State Republican Convention on June 16, 2012 who matter, not the results of the January 3 non-binding straw poll.

So, who won Iowa? The winner is the one who can control Iowa’s RNC delegation with his delegates, the one who the majority of the Iowa delegation is friendly to. That person is the one who will win Iowa. But the media loves an easy-to-cover horserace and the media reported differently. Lots of things can change between now and the August 27 start of the Republican National Convention in Tampa.

39 votes

WNYC New York Public Radio Covers Daily Paul!

Hello friends,

Daily Paul founder Michael Nystrom did me the honor of allowing to speak to the media on behalf of Daily Paul. WNYC was interested in the grassroots reaction to Dr. Paul's latest fundraising report and his candidacy thus far. Here is the article from their website. Please check it out.

http://www.wnyc.org/articles/its-free-country/2012/mar/22/wh...

75 votes

The Three Political Parties of America

There are three political parties in the United States today, and they are all fielding candidates for the presidency.

The parties are the Republicrats, the Scared Religionists, and the Freedom and Peace Party.

By far the largest party is the Republicrats, who have held sway with their current platform since at least the 1940s. They are offering two candidates for president in 2012: their names are Mitt Romney and Barack Obama.

4 votes

Why I Support Ron Paul

In this present crisis, government is not the solution to our problem; government is the problem. - Ronald Reagan, First Inaugural Address, January 20th, 1981

35 votes

Michael Steele, MSNBC TV commentator, gives his rejoinder. Postmortem 1

Michael Steele, MSNBC TV commentator, gives his rejoinder. Postmortem 1 .

http://youtu.be/aIuhGDDrBUg

12 votes

How Mossad Justified Its Murder of an Innocent Iranian Electrical Engineer

On July 23, 2011, a 35-year-old Iranian electrical engineering student named Darioush Rezaeinejad was gunned down as he and his wife, who was also wounded in the attack, waited for their child in front of a kindergarten in Tehran.

Israel has never denied that it was behind that assassination, and two senior US officials have confirmed to NBC news that the accusation by Ali Larijani - a senior adviser to Iran's supreme leader Ali Khamenei - that Israel's Mossad had used the Mujahideen E. Khalq (MEK) to carry out the killing of Iranian scientists was essentially accurate.

Rezaeinejad was the fourth Iranian scientist whom the Israelis had tried to assassinate, but what was different about his assassination is the subsequent effort by the Israelis to justify it after the fact. That effort casts new light not only on the larger assassination campaign, but on the way in which Israel has gone about constructing its contention that there is an active Iranian nuclear weapons program.

46 votes

Don’t Be Scammed Into Another War - 7 Ways Kony 2012 Does Exactly That

There’s a 30-minute long YouTube sensation that’s gotten more than 70 million views in just a few days.  The stated goals of the expertly produced Kony 2012 is to make an African warlord a household name and to keep U.S. military advisors in Uganda.

Because ideas presented in the documentary are stated as “something we can all agree on,” I find it important to step forward and say that I do not in the slightest agree with the idea of U.S. military advisors in Uganda.  In fact, I think that the work being done by Kony 2012 director Jason Russell and a number of organizations and activists on this topic is flat wrong.

Kony 2012 has a “power-to-the-people” feel to it and calls for action that is humanitarian in nature, making it ideal in convincing naïve, well-intentioned people about the justness of having foreign troops in Uganda.

However, my years of political involvement have shown me that people must not be judged on what they say, but on what they do.  As well-intentioned as they are couched, Russell’s actions move us toward American military involvement in Uganda under popular pressure and under a veneer of justice.  This is not an admirable goal and the talking points are familiar ones.

In fact, his techniques are so familiar that the maker of this film sounds like a neo-conservative, especially from September 10, 2001 until W’s mission accomplished speech on May 1, 2003.

47 votes

Dana Milbank, NBC Contributor, Washington Post Political Columnist

Dana Milbank, NBC Contributor, Washington Post Political Columnist, does not know which of the candidates will reduce spending the most.

http://youtu.be/IoGYDqQq0IQ

Syndicate content