Robin Koerner's blog

19 votes

Capitalism is Progressive - and Must Get Off the Defensive

If much of the economic commentary in the mainstream media is to be believed, the rising inequality of wealth in Anglo societies and the crashing of our economy by the big banks and financial class make the problems of capitalism not just evident but self-evident.

Such claims are made, of course, against a background of hundreds of years of capitalist growth that has, for the overwhelming bulk of our population, made affordable the books that these claimants have presumably read, the computers on which they type, the Internet on which they do their research, the air-conditioning or central heating in the room where they do it, and even the food in their bellies – food of a variety and quality unparalleled in history.

But this background of utter success is taken so much for granted that it is almost entirely invisible.

20 votes

Dogmatic Libertarians: Libertarian on Everything - Except Liberty?

The American Liberty movement is no longer nascent. Its mainstreaming is under way, as evidenced by this article in the New York Times - the paper that (almost) defines the American mainstream - about the impact of liberty-focused activists on the ("mainstream") Republican party, as reflected at CPAC last week.

Both culturally and politically, libertarianism is on the rise.

At its simplest, it is a philosophy that asserts the simple principle that we are all free to live our lives as we please inasmuch as we do not limit the freedom of others to do the same. It recognizes that we all have different backgrounds, desires and ambitions, and different metrics and systems for judging the behaviors and choices of ourselves and others.

Since it rests on the notion that one human being cannot know what is best for another - or at least cannot know it better than the other person, himself - it is an essentially humble philosophy in disposition and an essentially tolerant philosophy in prescription. Indeed, tolerance, manifest as lack of aggression, is just about its only hard-and-fast prescription.

8 votes

The problem with libertarians - alternative version (also for fun!)

8 votes

The Problem with Libertarians (for fun)

44 votes

The USA Has a Monarchy. Let It Have a Glorious Revolution

This year marks the 1,000th anniversary of political liberty. When the United States began, the tradition in which it was founded was already 762 years old.

As I wrote recently in celebration of this magnificent anniversary, those who would protect freedom in our country badly scupper themselves by their ignorance of history, and there is perhaps no greater obstacle to our understanding of the history that matters than our founding myth.

America was born as a liberty-protecting Republic in opposition to a tyrannical monarchy, so the story goes. While more and more Americans are (thankfully) beginning to see the myriad travesties against our liberty that are being performed by our governing elite as threatening our very identity as a nation that exists to defend natural, unalienable and individual rights, we are all doing very much less well at seeing quite how deeply the founding purpose of our country has been subverted.

Because we "know" that not only are we not a monarchy Constitutionally, but also that our very existence is owed to its denial as a morally decadent institution, we cannot possibly admit the truth about what we have let our country become: America is now a monarchy.

Monarchy has a simple meaning - the "rule of one". As Alexander Hamilton correctly said, "'monarch' is an indefinite term. It marks not either the degree or duration of power". The fact that our king is elected for four years, then, does not change his status as a monarch.

In America today, the President can sign executive orders such as E.O. 13603, on "National Defense Resources Preparedness", in which he claims the right to revoke all contracts and nationalize all aspects of American life even outside a state of emergency. (Bill Clinton had signed a similar order, but with applicability limited to a state of emergency only, however that may be defined. Power only ever drives in one direction.) The Executive has also claimed the authority to strike militarily countries that do not threaten our own, without a supporting vote in the House, and even to kill American citizens without any independent legal process. It also works with its agents, again without the express approval of the people's representatives or, certainly, the knowledge of the people themselves, to receive by covert means the most private details of our lives.

20 votes

Political Liberty Turns 1,000 Years Old! Time to Learn the History Our Founders Knew

Ernest Renan, a nineteenth-century French philosopher, noted, "Getting its history wrong is part of being a nation."

This truth has profound implications, chief among which is that the cultural and political trajectory of a nation is determined not only by its past, but also - and to a greater extent - by the stories it tells itself about its past.

The United States' founding myth rests on the idea that suppressed Americans fought for liberty against some tyrannical and foreign "other".

6 votes

Political Journalism Masterclass with Robin Koerner Blue Republican

In summer 2011, Robin Koerner, a then completely unknown writer, had an article published on the Huffington Post that went viral. It inspired a movement, called “Blue Republican”, which endures to this day, and put him on the map as a political activist and a writer in the liberty tradition. Since then, some of Robin’s articles have seen even greater traffic.

On 18th Feb, five people will have the chance to speak with Robin in a kind of masterclass in Political Journalism.

7 votes

Liberty vs. Security: A False Dichotomy

There is really only one argument in support of mass surveillance by the State: increased security can be bought with reduced privacy.

That claim begs the question: “how much privacy buys how much security?”

It is almost impossible to imagine how two completely different abstractions – security and liberty – could be compared, when idiomatically, we can’t even compare apples and oranges, so we should be very uneasy that an entire political age has been built on just such a comparison.

13 votes

Obamacare: BEWARE the Invisible "Glitches"

I recently wrote an impassioned article about the philosophy that underlies the Obamacare and the way in which it was sold to the nation.

Its argument stands, but I have just learned that that article included an error - an error made because of problems with the WA Health Exchange site through which I purchased my plan.

45 votes

Why I Shall Become An American

Sometime toward the end of this year, I shall become an American citizen.

A few of my European friends look confused when they realize that I go around the world expounding the importance of liberty -- and yet choose to live in the U.S.

They are thinking, of course, of all the obvious stuff, like the abuses against privacy by the NSA; the killing of innocents in ill-considered or even dishonest interventionist militarism; the foreign policy that produces terrorists in the name of destroying them. These Americanisms are made all the more ugly by the apparent hypocrisy: any abuses against liberty are bad, but those that are perpetrated by a state that consistently justifies them by the need to protect liberty, are a special kind of pathetic.

Some Europeans also know something about America's almost unique taxation of its citizens on income earned outside the country -- a clear disincentive that superficially, at least, makes American citizenship one of the most unappealing in the world.

As a liberty-lover, why would I tie myself to all of that -- for life?

I am not interested in becoming American because America has less than anywhere else of what is bad: I'll do it because America has more of what is good -- the good of informed, passionate and principled resistance against all of those things that shouldn't be so.

Stuck on an L.A. freeway in 2005, I was listening to NPR, when an interview came on with Greg Palast, a celebrated American journalist and author who moved to the U.K. when he realized that his investigative work was not getting the air-time it deserved in the U.S.. During the interview, Palast was asked whether he wanted to bring up his newly born children in England -- the country where he had built a life and highly successful career -- or in the United States -- the country of his birth.

43 votes

Conscripted Into Obamacare, I Conscientiously Object

I have been trying to work out why I am so upset about Obamacare.

We already live in a social democratic state that forcibly takes my money through taxes for things that I don't think anyone's money should be taken for. I may feel there is a better way to build the roads than have the government pay for them through massively redistributive taxation, collected essentially by force, but I don't get angry about using them every day.

So isn't there a prima facie case to be made that if we are stuck with a huge state, taxing and spending to the tune of about a third of the economy, then at least the attempt to save lives and maintain health through this questionable system is better than the funding of secret agencies to spy on us and otherwise eliminate our basic civil rights, the deployment of massive military capability that makes more enemies rather than eliminating any immediate threat, or the transfer of the hard earned wealth of working Americans to already privileged financiers?

How can Obamacare possibly be as bad as that litany, and why do I find myself angry about it, even as I find deeply hypocritical the objections of many Republicans whose party was actually responsible for designing the ACA that they now decry?

12 votes

Rand Paul is Right: Civil Rights Aren't Simple Rights

Something recently happened in England that warrants revisiting Rachel Maddow's (in?)famous 2010 interview with Rand Paul concerning the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

In April of this year, Rachel Maddow also revisited that interview, following Rand's visit to Howard University, during which he answers a question from a student with the sentence: "I do question some of the ramifactions and extensions, and I have never come out in opposition to the Civil Rights Act ... I have never questioned the Civil Rights Act".

12 votes

Blue Republican launches its tenth chapter

The website of Blue Republican (bluerepublican.org) launched in 2011 by Independents/Liberals who joined the Republican party to support Ron Paul and growing today to promote the ideas of Liberty non-dogmatically to the American mainstream, announced the launching of its tenth city/state chapter today.

Blue Republican is now present in Arizona, California, Colorado, Illinois, North Carolina, Michigan, New Jersey, Tennessee, and the city of Houston TX.

It even has an active international chapter in Poland.

9 votes

In Times of Tyranny, Democracy Is Liberty's Friend

At many times in the history of the Anglo people, the abuses of liberty by Power (capitalized to indicate the official power of the centralized State and those close to it) have produced such resistance by enough normal men and women who felt their lives directly changed by those abuses, that real political change of historic importance was the result.

10 votes

Interview: Blue Republican successes and future - and the Third Party Debates for 2016!


http://youtu.be/WOX2mMz_7x8

This is the first part of nice interview with David Ortiz, covering the origin of Blue Republican, its usefulness in winning supporters for liberty and most importantly, the THIRD PARTY DEBATES of which Blue Republican will be a coalition member.


http://youtu.be/ZcE2df89ivo

In the second part, we cover some recent successes of Blue Republican, and our future, including the establishment of State Chapters, and deploying the brand in state and city races.

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