Comment: Generational conflict

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Generational conflict

ironman77: One of the benefits of hoarding property is as a hedge against old age or disability.

You will notice that the relationship between the boomers and their parents is characterized not only by the so-called "generation gap" during the boomer youth (that youth culture being praised as "progressive" while their parents were "stuck in the past with all its social pathologies") -- but also by a reversal with the decades in which the so-called "Greatest Generation" is contrasted with the "spoiled boomers" -- a reversal that further pitted those generations against one another.

The end game of that generational conflict is now playing out with the deaths of the "Greatest Generation" -- frequently owning properties that the boomers can never hope to acquire. I won't go into all of the myths currently surrounding the "spoiled boomers" and their dying "Great" parents. But suffice it to say that when you have a demographic collapse (discounted for immigration -- essentially the government "electing a new people") of the kind seen during the years of boomer fertility, while their parents enjoyed an "empty nest" per-capita square footage of house vastly in excess of any myths about "McMansions" -- there is something deeply wrong with the popular diagnosis.

What happened is that local relationships were disintermediated by incorporations such as governments and globalized businesses. In nature title to property is transferred to the posterity prior to death as part of an intergenerational "contract" built into our very biology. The obscene image of retired couples riding around in $100,000 recreational vehicles sporting bumper stickers "Die Broke" leaving behind 2,500ft^2 of empty housing while their grandchildren are being left to the tender mercies of day care and public schools, not to mentions mind-damaging "higher education" and incorporation into group entities that treat them as segments, is something we need to terminate.

If you read nothing else, read this: A Contract Between Americans