Comment: Good answer, Wirebaugh

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Good answer, Wirebaugh

However, is the presidency any less of an "establishment" position? Dr. Paul needs hard accomplishments to convince the American people he would be an effective president. Dr. Paul is in a unique position to forge bipartisan coalitions from the "left" and the "right" to accomplish some real good. Imagine cutting the defense budget by 50%, closing overseas bases, selling government assets, ending the Fed and the IRS, prosecuting Bush and Cheney for war crimes, prosecuting Goldman-Sachs and Fed officers for debasing the currency.

After the 2010 elections, Barack Obama will be a "lame duck" president. Certainly, Obama and the Senate will still be in a good position to frustrate Dr. Paul's efforts. However, if they do so, they risk subjecting themselves to the wrath of the American voter. This also applies, to a lesser extent to the MSM and special interest groups. If a "Ron Paul" House still fails to achieve even one piece of Dr. Paul's agenda, that agenda will be debated and discussed by the American people, and the voters will beg for a Ron Paul presidency.