Comment: A day is a day is a day

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A day is a day is a day

This is a bit long, but it should settle the issue.

The word "day" in its singular and plural forms is used about 2300 times in the Old Testament. Why is it that the only time its meaning is questioned is in the first chapter of Genesis? Why is the only time that people want to make it mean thousands or millions or even billions of years is in Genesis? Why aren't other instances of the word "day" interpreted as long periods of time in other passages? Why don't we hear people questioning the meaning of the word "day" in Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, Deuteronomy, Joshua, Judges, etc.?

For example, the Bible tells us that Joshua marched around Jericho for six days. Why does no one wonder if he marched around the city for six billion years? Why does no one ask if Jonah spent three thousand years in the belly of the great fish? When we are told to work for six days, and rest for one, where are the Bible scholars that tell us that our workweek is supposed to be six million years long, and a rest for one million years? Nowhere to be found, are they? Why only Genesis?

Obviously, there are words that can have more than one meaning, so how do we determine their meaning? Simple - the context. For instance, Ken Ham (he's from Australia) often uses this example for the famous word "day":

"Back in my father's day, it took 10 days to drive across the Australian Outback during the day."

The word "day" is used there three times, and each use has a different meaning. The first "day" means time, the second one means a 24-hour day, and the third means the daylight portion of a day. The Bible uses the word the same way, and the context will tell you its meaning. Why is it that we apply common sense everywhere except Genesis?

In Genesis, the plain reading of the text is obvious: the word day means a plain old, regular, literal, 24-hour, one revolution on the Earth's axis, day. This is further proved by three other facts:

First, as I've previously stated, Exodus 20:9-11 tells us clearly that the days of Genesis One are plain old, regular, literal, 24-hour days. "Six days you shall labor and do all your work, but the seventh day is a sabbath of the Lord your God; in it you shall not do any work, you or your son or your daughter, your male or your female servant or your cattle or your sojourner who stays with you."

Why?

"For in six days the Lord made the heavens and the earth, the sea and all that is in them, and rested on the seventh day; therefore the Lord blessed the sabbath day and made it holy."

That is why we have a seven-day week. All of our other calendar measurements of time come from the sun, earth and moon. A day is one revolution of the earth on its axis. A month is one orbit of the moon around the earth. A year is one orbit of the earth around the sun. But why is a week seven days instead of three or nine or twelve and a half? Because it is an acknowledgment of God's creation in Genesis.

Second, by the usage of the Hebrew word "yom" (or yowm) - "day" - in the rest of the OT. In the OT, outside of Genesis chapter one, the word day (singular or plural) is used 410 times with a number, and it always means an ordinary day. Whenever the phrase "evening and morning" is used without the word day (38 times), it always means an ordinary day. Whenever the words evening or morning are used by themselves with the word day (23 times each), it always means an ordinary day. Whenever the word night is used with day (52 times), it always means an ordinary day.

Now let's look at Genesis 1:

Genesis 1:5 God called the light day, and the darkness He called night. And there was evening and there was morning, one day.

What do we have? Day and night, evening, morning, number, day.

Genesis 1:8 God called the expanse heaven. And there was evening and there was morning, a second day.

What do we have? Evening, morning, number, day.

Genesis 1:13 There was evening and there was morning, a third day.

What do we have? Evening, morning, number, day.

Genesis 1:19 There was evening and there was morning, a fourth day.

What do we have? Evening, morning, number, day.

Genesis 1:23 There was evening and there was morning, a fifth day.

What do we have? Evening, morning, number, day.

Genesis 1:31 God saw all that He had made, and behold, it was very good. And there was evening and there was morning, the sixth day.

What do we have? Evening, morning, number, day.

Go back and look at verse 5. First, we have night and day. What are we being told? It's an ordinary day. Then we have evening. In case you didn't get it right, it's an ordinary day. Then we have morning. In case you're a little thick, it's really an ordinary day. Then what? A number. In case you are severely intellectually challenged, it's an ordinary day. How else could you tell someone it's an ordinary day? So what does "day" mean in Genesis One? "I'll take the Blatantly Obvious for 500, Alex."

Third, the plural form yammim (days), never bears any other sense in Scripture than that of ordinary days, as per Exodus 20:11, quoted earlier. The bottom line is that the days of Genesis are plain old ordinary days. A day is a day is a day. Like the rest of the Bible, you don't have to believe that. But don't try to make the text say something that it doesn't.

No King but Jesus, no President but Ron Paul