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Comment: We don't know who pays for the media so we don't see who does...

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We don't know who pays for the media so we don't see who does...

Journalism is a for-profit business and it has always needed to be so first and foremost in order to stay in business. It has always been this way and it is just by contrast more obvious to us now since the emergence of the blogosphere, which is able to operate at a much lower overhead and can obtain information at almost no expense and is not compromised by the need to print stories in a manner that keeps those paying for the large operating expenses of traditional journalistic ventures happy. The blogosphere doesn’t need for 95% of its operating revenue to come from what publication businesses really sell, which is Public Relations and Advertising serving outside interests while it is, by itself, the truth doesn’t bring in much in the way of revenue at all.

Because of the free access to internet search engines, the blogosphere does not need to pay salaries to reporters or subscribe to proprietary news services at great expense which thus must be offset by Advertising and Public Relations stories which inherently influence content due to a compromised financial dynamic endemic to all traditional for-profit media sources. It’s not that traditional media is insidious by nature, but they just can’t help but to fudge the truth here and there in the cause of their bottom lines or else they can’t stay in business.

If it had been that whatever we paid for a hard copy of a newspaper twenty years ago actually paid all of the expenses it took to run a newspaper twenty years ago, we would have been reading a lot more truth in the newspapers twenty years ago….but nobody would have ever wanted to pay $25 for a daily copy of the New York Times which instead has been leading its industry in profitablility by telling just enough truth to keep us believing it is believable which is what makes a publication like the New York Times so marketable to those who are willing to buy what it sells for the really big money, which is Public Relations attention submitted to a large and accepting audience.

Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has. - Margaret Mead