Comment: you mean your standard of perfection.

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you mean your standard of perfection.

It's notable that you don't use a literal word for word translation in your example verses. It looks like you are using the NIV which is not the most literal type of translation. The translators of the NIV took more liberties there to convey what they think the gist of a sentence is saying:

Your choice of translation:
Luke 23:46 ""Father, into your hands I commit my spirit." When he had said this, he breathed his last."
John 19:30 ""It is finished." With that, he bowed his head and gave up his spirit."

Traditionally, luke23:46 is thought to be the actual last phrase he uttered, but it is notable that in most other translations of John 19:30 the phrase "with that" does not exist. but instead it says "and".. here are a few examples:

(NASB) Therefore when Jesus had received the sour wine, He said, "It is finished!" And He bowed His head and gave up His spirit.

(ESV) When Jesus had received the sour wine, he said, "It is finished," and he bowed his head and gave up his spirit.

(GSB) Als nun Jesus den Essig genommen hatte, sprach er: Es ist vollbracht! Und er neigte das Haupt und übergab den Geist.

(KJV) When Jesus therefore had received the vinegar, he said, It is finished: and he bowed his head, and gave up the ghost.

(Geneva) Nowe when Iesus had receiued of the vineger, he saide, It is finished, and bowed his head, and gaue vp the ghost.

(DRB) Jesus therefore, when he had taken the vinegar, said: It is consummated. And bowing his head, he gave up the ghost.

(EMTV) Therefore when Jesus received the sour wine, He said, "It is finished!" And bowing His head, He gave up His spirit.

"with that" is more inclusive than "and" which most translations use.

But despite your poor choice of translation, John 19:30 mentions that after he said "it is finished", he gave up his spirit, or his last breath, and Luke 23:46 shows that Luke 23:46 happens when he has his last breath, which is after the utterance of John 19:30:

John 19:30 ""It is finished." With that, he bowed his head and gave up his spirit."
Luke 23:46 ""Father, into your hands I commit my spirit." When he had said this, he breathed his last."

You could insert Luke's account like this:

"It is finished." With that, he bowed his head and gave up his spirit [and in giving up his spirit with his final breath he said:] "Father, into your hands I commit my spirit." When he had said this, he breathed his last.").

The giving up of the spirit is not exhaustively explained in John, but Luke tells more about it, and John does not say that Jesus said nothing during the giving up of his spirit, so there is no mutual exclusivity.

It's hard to say if he bowed his head while or after saying "it is finished", but it is clear that it wasn't before he said the final phrase from Luke and breathed his last .

Simon Greenleaf detailed the positive significance of the normal eyewitness accounts, and how they prove the account is more reliable than if all accounts were written exactly the same since they would then give the appearance of collusion. and if they were written the same, I'm sure you would object to that as well. What you see as imperfection in your view is actually very good from Greenleafs legal perspective.