Comment: speciation is absolutely part of evolution

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Joη's picture

speciation is absolutely part of evolution

One cannot "accept speciation" yet "deny evolution". This sounds identical to the above person who accepted "microevolution" but not "macroevolution", as if that distinction mattered.

Evolution occurs through the propagation of favorable mutation.

I maintain most do not appreciate the orders of magnitude involved that make a rule as simple as that into every organism we see. So I shall attempt a very crude series of approximations:

There are at least 103.5 quadrillion mammals, birds, bugs, trees, and fish alive today (can't find numbers for reptiles). Let's conservatively say each of them house one million bacteria, and only 1/1000 is procreating, so we're at .1 sextillion organisms. Every single one of these is transcribing at least 1 chromosome of minimum 1 million base pairs, so that's at least 103,500,435,282,189,450,000,000,000 or 103.5 septillion fallible hands transcribing at this instant for life on Earth (but very likely much, much more). And they doesn't always transcribe verbatim.

That is where the "ever increasing amount of genetic information" comes from. Are you saying that number is not big enough to be whittled by the rise and fall of predators, resources, temperatures, and continents through the ages to yield the diversity we see in the current tree of life?

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