Comment: The document is not the problem...

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Denise B's picture

The document is not the problem...

the people are.

You’re statement: “Even as I would concede that the Constitution is the single greatest document ever forged by man, the single greatest ‘anything’ forged by man will still be imperfect and our founding documents are no exception.”, pretty much sums up the reasons why many in the liberty movement, myself included, asserts that our quickest path to liberty is by forcing the government back into the constraints of (or as Thomas Jefferson stated, the “chains of”) the Constitution.

Just as you stated, nothing that we ever come up with is going to be perfect. The Constitution is no exception; however, our own history bears out the fact that when it is followed, it results in a free and prosperous nation. It is only when government is allowed to step outside of the clearly defined restraints on it’s authority that we begin to see our problems grow and our liberties shrink.

The vast majority of the problems that we have with our government today do not stem from the Constitution per se, but instead are a direct result of government overstepping it’s authority as clearly defined in the Constitution. I don’t care how perfectly written a governing document may be, governments by nature are always going to tend toward tyranny and encroachments of liberty and the people are the only thing that can ultimately stop that from happening. No document or system human beings ever devise is going to stop that from happening without a populace that is willing to stand up and demand that their rights be respected. No governing document, no matter how perfectly written, can enforce or defend itself.

What exactly do you propose instead of the Constitution? Or are you implying that we should have no governing document or authority at all? Are you proposing anarchy?...because that certainly poses a whole new set of issues and problems. How exactly, and under what circumstances could we possibly create and implement a new system of governance and how could we possibly control that process and then have it enforced when we are already having so much trouble with the one that we have? I think that before we could even begin to come up with a new or better system, we need to start by enforcing the one that we already have in place, and until we can do that, we simply will not be in a situation to change anything, short of through civil war.

I also do not agree that taxation in and of itself is theft. Any system of governance is going to require the ability to raise funds (whether it be on a local, state or federal level), unless of course you are promoting anarchy, in which case you should just state that, because that requires an entirely different debate. Although it is true that the Constitution does allow the federal government the power of taxation, there were (and still are) severe restraints on the methods they could use to tax. Especially direct taxation (the most dangerous of all), which can only “legally” be done through apportionment and which is the only provision in the Constitution which is stated twice because they were so adamant about restricting the government’s ability to do so. Despite popular perception, the 16th Amendment did not change that. Again, the fact that the government operates as if it did is not a flaw with the document itself, but the result of an uneducated populace who can’t be bothered to take the time to be informed about their governing document nor be bothered to defend their rights. Again, The document is not the problem....the people are.