Comment: Yes, the monetary system must be fixed first, but is it

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Yes, the monetary system must be fixed first, but is it

possible to do so?

Perhaps what we need to look at is the order in which things went south.

The Monetary system, and the so-called income tax along with it, didn't come about until 1913.

Same with elected Senators.

There were many problems and mistakes that led to those three.

We need to trace back father, and look at more systemic problems.

I suggest, that the FIRST thing we need to fix goes all the way back to the first amendment.

That is, the first amendment proposed, not the first amendment adopted.

Many do not know that the "Bill of Rights" was not originally 10 amendments. Congress proposed 12.

The most requested amendment dealt with the size of congressional districts. However, due to either an error, or an intentional manipulation, the language of that amendment, Article the First, rendered it useless so it was not ratified. The second article later became Amendment 27.

The size of Congressional Districts is directly related to how well Congress behaves. If representatives are too far removed from their constituents, if they can get elected without having to personally reach each constituent, if they have too many constituents to deal with, then we fall to the error of "virtual representation" and a Congress that is severely out of touch with reality.

We FIRST need to pass a corrected Article the First which limits Congressional districts to 50,000 inhabitants as the Framers counseled us.

We can then proceed to correct the errors in the House rules which allow too much power in the leadership, and not enough in the membership as originally intended.

We can then proceed to correct the errors of the 14th, 16th and 17th amendments, and to end the FED and restore sound money.

After that, the rest will easily fall into place.

Go back to the source of the problem - Congressional Districts that were too large to begin with leading to virtual rather than actual representation.