Comment: Combat/war is addictive

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Combat/war is addictive

so a retired two star Major General, revered by West Point once told me. He said surviving a combat experience gave him a rush he found difficult to dispel. Recall the end in the movie The Hurt Locker where Jeremy Renner’s character goes home and then we find him right back defusing bombs in Iraq unable to assimilate for long into a normal mundane life with his wife and infant son. It’s tragic that we send our young men to war and they aren’t the same after that. We focus on the sanctity of military service irrespective of the damage it causes to the psyche and one’s moral foundation. Ron Paul’s statement speaks to the flawed foreign policy that elevates military adventures to herodom. It was not directed at Chris Kyle personally who merely symbolizes the sickness of the culture that resulted in 160 sniper killings. Sadly Ron got a pummeling for speaking the truth as a man who served our country as a flight surgeon officer. Hagel, a combat veteran, also got pummeled at his hearing. There is an unhealthy disconnect when self-proclaimed patriots like Ted Cruz (who never served in the military) define these men by their own false paradigms. Rand’s tweet disappointed me for its misplaced emphasis albeit politically ‘correct’ tone; the Liberty movement is forced to work that much harder, sigh.
Chris Hedges (New York Times war correspondent and journalist): "The rush of battle is a potent and often lethal addiction for war is a drug."